Cover image for Rogue states : the rule of force in world affairs
Title:
Rogue states : the rule of force in world affairs
Author:
Chomsky, Noam.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, MA : South End Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
254 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1600 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780896086128

9780896086111
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library KZ6374 .C48 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library KZ6374 .C48 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

With his characteristic wit and exhaustive knowledge of world affairs, Chomsky addresses our most current international crises.


Summary

Contents

Rogues' Gallery: Who Qualifies?
Rogue States
Crisis in the Balkans
East Timor Retrospective
"Plan Colombia"
Cuba and the US Government: David vs. Goliath
Putting on the Pressure: Latin America
Jubilee 2000
"Recovering Rights": A Crooked Path
The United States and the "Challenge of Universality"
The Legacy of War
Millennium Greetings
Power in the Domestic Arena
Socioeconomic Sovereignty
Notes
Index

An Excerpt from Rogue States by Noam Chomsky

The concept of "rogue state" plays a pre-eminent role today in policy planning and analysis.

The current Iraq crisis is only the latest example. Washington and London declared Iraq a "rogue state," a threat to its neighbors and to the entire world, an "outlaw nation" led by a reincarnation of Hitler who must be contained by the guardians of world order, the United States and its British "junior partner," to adopt the term ruefully employed by the British foreign office half a century ago. The concept merits a close look.

[...]

A secret 1995 study of the Strategic Command, which is responsible for the strategic nuclear arsenal, outlines the basic thinking. Released through the Freedom of Information Act, the study, Essentials of Post-Cold War Deterrence , "shows how the United States shifted its deterrent strategy from the defunct Soviet Union to so-called rogue states such as Iraq, Libya, Cuba and North Korea," AP reports. The study advocates that the US exploit its nuclear arsenal to portray itself as "irrational and vindictive if its vital interests are attacked." That "should be a part of the national persona we project to all adversaries," in particular the "rogue states." "It hurts to portray ourselves as too fully rational and cool-headed," let alone committed to such silliness as international law and treaty obligations. "The fact that some elements" of the US government "may appear to be potentially 'out of control' can be beneficial to creating and reinforcing fears and doubts within the minds of an adversary's decision makers." The report resurrects Nixon's "madman theory": our enemies should recognize that we are crazed and unpredictable, with extraordin


Author Notes

Noam Chomsky was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 7, 1928. Son of a Russian emigrant who was a Hebrew scholar, Chomsky was exposed at a young age to the study of language and principles of grammar. During the 1940s, he began developing socialist political leanings through his encounters with the New York Jewish intellectual community.

Chomsky received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied linguistics, mathematics, and philosophy. He conducted much of his research at Harvard University. In 1955, he began teaching at MIT, eventually holding the Ferrari P. Ward Chair of Modern Language and Linguistics.

Today Chomsky is highly regarded as both one of America's most prominent linguists and most notorious social critics and political activists. His academic reputation began with the publication of Syntactic Structures in 1957. Within a decade, he became known as an outspoken intellectual opponent of the Vietnam War.

Chomsky has written many books on the links between language, human creativity, and intelligence, including Language and Mind (1967) and Knowledge of Language: Its Nature, Origin, and Use (1985). He also has written dozens of political analyses, including Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), Chronicles of Dissent (1992), and The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many (1993).

(Bowker Author Biography) Noam Chomsky, professor of linguistics and philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the author of more than 80 books. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

(Publisher Provided)


Noam Chomsky was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 7, 1928. Son of a Russian emigrant who was a Hebrew scholar, Chomsky was exposed at a young age to the study of language and principles of grammar. During the 1940s, he began developing socialist political leanings through his encounters with the New York Jewish intellectual community.

Chomsky received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied linguistics, mathematics, and philosophy. He conducted much of his research at Harvard University. In 1955, he began teaching at MIT, eventually holding the Ferrari P. Ward Chair of Modern Language and Linguistics.

Today Chomsky is highly regarded as both one of America's most prominent linguists and most notorious social critics and political activists. His academic reputation began with the publication of Syntactic Structures in 1957. Within a decade, he became known as an outspoken intellectual opponent of the Vietnam War.

Chomsky has written many books on the links between language, human creativity, and intelligence, including Language and Mind (1967) and Knowledge of Language: Its Nature, Origin, and Use (1985). He also has written dozens of political analyses, including Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), Chronicles of Dissent (1992), and The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many (1993).

(Bowker Author Biography) Noam Chomsky, professor of linguistics and philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is the author of more than 80 books. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

(Publisher Provided)


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

World-famous MIT linguist Chomsky has long kept up a second career as a cogent voice of the hard left, excoriating American imperialism, critiquing blinkered journalists and attacking global economic injustice. Chomsky's new work, a collection of linked essays, comes in the wake of the Kosovo bombings and the recent riots in East Timor. Its sardonic title recalls the argument that America ought to defend the world against "rogue states" like Iraq and Libya. Chomsky contends that the U.S. (and, sometimes, its allies) has itself behaved as the biggest rogue state, ignoring international law and norms and acting only in the richest Americans' interests. Chapters cover the former Yugoslavia, East Timor, Cuba, and (a particularly powerful one) Third World debt. Chomsky includes accounts of havoc that , he charges, the U.S. has wreaked (or helped wreak) in poor countries, from overturned elections to mass slaughterÄfrom Guatemala in the 1950s to Sudan, Cuba, Mexico and Laos today. "Contempt for the rule of law," Chomsky contends, "is deeply rooted in U.S. practice and intellectual culture." Chomsky's research can bring home disturbing issues that the mainstream media miss (for example, that the Pentagon refuses to give up data that would make it easier to clear dangerous landmines from old wars around the world). In other places, Chomsky can seem shrill, quick to judge or obsessed with irrelevant details: he spends a paragraph attacking Clinton's secretary of defense for quoting Theodore Roosevelt ("this famous racist fanatic and raving jingoist"). Though not all his points hold equal power, Chomsky has delivered another impressive argument that the U.S. flouts international law when it finds it convenient to do so. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

Even a cursory reading of Noam Chomsky's latest collection of essays, Rogue States: The Rule of Force in World Politics, reveals an approach to international affairs that is anything but "mainstream." The author suggests that while the term "rogue state" is most often applied by Western powers to describe the actions of Cuba and North Korea, the term is better applied to the US and its allies. Chomsky argues that, while the US has historically embraced the mantle of human rights, it has simultaneously acted as if international law were a weapon to be used rather than something to be obeyed. As evidence Chomsky cites a litany of US violations of international law including the US embargo against Cuba, support for the Colombian drug war, and disdain for human rights conventions. Unfortunately, Chomsky fails to adequately explain where the blame for this hypocrisy lies other than to point a finger at capitalist forces that manipulate democratic institutions and international markets. Chomsky's essays certainly have the potential for generating discussion on international institutions and regimes. Recommended for upper-level undergraduate or graduate-level international relations courses and library collections serving undergraduate and graduate students. M. A. Elrod Harding University


Publisher's Weekly Review

World-famous MIT linguist Chomsky has long kept up a second career as a cogent voice of the hard left, excoriating American imperialism, critiquing blinkered journalists and attacking global economic injustice. Chomsky's new work, a collection of linked essays, comes in the wake of the Kosovo bombings and the recent riots in East Timor. Its sardonic title recalls the argument that America ought to defend the world against "rogue states" like Iraq and Libya. Chomsky contends that the U.S. (and, sometimes, its allies) has itself behaved as the biggest rogue state, ignoring international law and norms and acting only in the richest Americans' interests. Chapters cover the former Yugoslavia, East Timor, Cuba, and (a particularly powerful one) Third World debt. Chomsky includes accounts of havoc that , he charges, the U.S. has wreaked (or helped wreak) in poor countries, from overturned elections to mass slaughterÄfrom Guatemala in the 1950s to Sudan, Cuba, Mexico and Laos today. "Contempt for the rule of law," Chomsky contends, "is deeply rooted in U.S. practice and intellectual culture." Chomsky's research can bring home disturbing issues that the mainstream media miss (for example, that the Pentagon refuses to give up data that would make it easier to clear dangerous landmines from old wars around the world). In other places, Chomsky can seem shrill, quick to judge or obsessed with irrelevant details: he spends a paragraph attacking Clinton's secretary of defense for quoting Theodore Roosevelt ("this famous racist fanatic and raving jingoist"). Though not all his points hold equal power, Chomsky has delivered another impressive argument that the U.S. flouts international law when it finds it convenient to do so. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Choice Review

Even a cursory reading of Noam Chomsky's latest collection of essays, Rogue States: The Rule of Force in World Politics, reveals an approach to international affairs that is anything but "mainstream." The author suggests that while the term "rogue state" is most often applied by Western powers to describe the actions of Cuba and North Korea, the term is better applied to the US and its allies. Chomsky argues that, while the US has historically embraced the mantle of human rights, it has simultaneously acted as if international law were a weapon to be used rather than something to be obeyed. As evidence Chomsky cites a litany of US violations of international law including the US embargo against Cuba, support for the Colombian drug war, and disdain for human rights conventions. Unfortunately, Chomsky fails to adequately explain where the blame for this hypocrisy lies other than to point a finger at capitalist forces that manipulate democratic institutions and international markets. Chomsky's essays certainly have the potential for generating discussion on international institutions and regimes. Recommended for upper-level undergraduate or graduate-level international relations courses and library collections serving undergraduate and graduate students. M. A. Elrod Harding University


Table of Contents

1 Rogues': Gallery Who Qualifies?p. 1
2 Rogue Statesp. 12
3 Crisis in the Balkansp. 34
4 East Timor Retrospectivep. 51
5 Plan Colombia""""""""p. 62
6 Cuba and the Us Governmentp. 82
7 Putting on the Pressurep. 93
8 Jubilee 2000p. 101
9 Recovering Rights"""": A Crooked Pathp. 108
10 The United States and the """"Challenge of Relativity""""p. 124
11 The Legacy of Warp. 156
12 Millennium Greetingsp. 174
13 Power in the Domestic Arenap. 188
14 Socioeconomic Sovereigntyp. 199
Notesp. 215
Indexp. 242
About South End Pressp. 253
1 Rogues': Gallery Who Qualifies?p. 1
2 Rogue Statesp. 12
3 Crisis in the Balkansp. 34
4 East Timor Retrospectivep. 51
5 Plan Colombia""""""""p. 62
6 Cuba and the Us Governmentp. 82
7 Putting on the Pressurep. 93
8 Jubilee 2000p. 101
9 Recovering Rights"""": A Crooked Pathp. 108
10 The United States and the """"Challenge of Relativity""""p. 124
11 The Legacy of Warp. 156
12 Millennium Greetingsp. 174
13 Power in the Domestic Arenap. 188
14 Socioeconomic Sovereigntyp. 199
Notesp. 215
Indexp. 242
About South End Pressp. 253

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