Cover image for Strong feelings : emotion, addiction, and human behavior
Title:
Strong feelings : emotion, addiction, and human behavior
Author:
Elster, Jon, 1940-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 2000.

©1999
Physical Description:
xii, 252 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
General Note:
"A Bradford book."
Language:
English
Contents:
Emotion -- Addiction -- Culture, emotion, and addiction -- Choice, emotion, and addiction.
ISBN:
9780262050562
Format :
Book

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BF531 .E475 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Presents the study of the interrelation between three explanatory approaches to behaviour: neurobiology, culture and choice. The book is organized around parallel analyses of emotion and addiction in order to bring out similarities as well as differences. Jon Elster's study sheds light on the generation of human behaviour, revealing how cognition, choice and rationality are undermined by the physical processes that underlie strong emotions and cravings.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Elster draws on his extensive work in the social sciences to examine the differences among choice, emotion, and addiction. He carefully analyzes the concept of rational decision making and contrasts it with the visceral, almost instantaneous reactions characteristic of emotion and addictions. He describes how physiological, cognitive, and cultural processes combine to produce specific behavioral patterns that differ among cultures, yet have underlying similarities. Elster's analysis illuminates the concept of choice by combining scientific and philosophical knowledge. This volume could be useful in several ways. For psychology students, it offers a comprehensive analysis that blends the boundaries of cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, and the growing field of addictions research. For philosophy students, it offers a unique manner of approaching the issue of free will by using a concept--addiction--that has paradoxical implications inherent in its definition. The author provides useful footnotes and a brief but current review of the relevant literature. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. L. Loers; Willamette University


Table of Contents

Preface and Acknowledgment
1 Introduction
2 Emotion
2.1 How Do We Know What We Know about Emotion?
2.2 What Emotions There Are
2.3 What Emotions Are: Phenomenological Analysis
Unique Qualitative "Feel"
Sudden Onset
Unbidden Occurrence
Brief Duration
Triggered By a Cognitive State
Directed Toward an Intentional Object
Inducing Physiological Changes ("Arousal")
Having Physiological and Physiognomic Expressions
Inducing Specific Action Tendencies
Accompanied By Pleasure or Pain ("Valence")
Summary
2.4 What Emotions Are: Causal Analysis
Proximate Causes
Remote Causes
Summary
3 Addiction
3.1 How Do We Know What We Know about Addiction?
3.2 What Addictions There Are
3.3 What Addictions Are: Phenomenological Analysis
Euphoria and Pleasure
Dysphoria and Withdrawal
Craving
Tolerance
Cue Dependence
Belief Dependence
Objective Harm
Crowding Out
Mood Alteration
Desire to Quit
Inability to Quit
Denial
Struggle for Self-control
Relapse
Summary
3.4 What Addictions Are: Causal Analysis
Primary Effects
Feedback Effects
Feedforward Effects
Sensitization
Summary
4 Culture, Emotion, and Addiction
4.1 The Concept of Culture
Coordination Equilibria
Social Norms
Values
Beliefs
Concepts
Culture as Shared
Summary
4.2 Culture and Emotion
Emotions as Supports of Social Norms
Emotions as the Object of Cognition
Emotions as the Object of Social Norms
Emotions As the Cause of Cognition
Justifying the Emotions
Summary
4.3 Culture and Addiction
Coordination Equilibria
Social Norms
Cognition
Summary
5 Choice, Emotion, and Addiction
5.1 The Concept of Choice
Action without Choice
Minimal Choice
Rational Choice
Summary
5.2 Choice and Emotion
Choosing Emotions
The Impact of Emotion on Choice
Emotion and Interest
Summary
5.3 Choice and Addiction
The Impact of Addiction on Minimal Choice
The Impact of Addiction On Rational Choice
Choosing to Become an Addict
Addiction and Self-Control
Summary
6 Conclusion
Notes
References
Index