Cover image for Native Americans of the Southwest
Title:
Native Americans of the Southwest
Author:
Kallen, Stuart A., 1955-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Lucent Books, 2000.
Physical Description:
112 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Summary:
Discusses the background, cultural practices, interaction with Spanish settlers, and current lives of some of the native peoples living in the American Southwest.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 9.6 5.0 51568.
ISBN:
9781560066811
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Discusses the background, cultural practices, interaction with Spanish settlers, and current lives of some of the native peoples living in the American Southwest.


Author Notes

Stuart A. Kallen has written more than 250 nonfiction books for children and young adults. His books have covered countless aspects of human history, culture, and science from the building of the pyramids to the music of the twenty-first century.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-A foreword states that this series "strives to present a complex, realistic picture of the many and varied Native American cultures-[offering] historical perspectives as well as a view of contemporary life-." Since this volume covers an entire region rather than a specific nation or cultural group, Kallen highlights features and history of the various cultures, often comparing and contrasting them. This method makes for an interesting survey of Native Southwestern cultures, but does not present an integrated picture of any individual tribe. Throughout the book, the author quotes extensively from primary and secondary sources, ranging from Geronimo's autobiography to the Pueblo Cultural Center Web site, but there is no mention of personal consultation with members of any of the cultures discussed. While the perspective is definitely that of an outsider looking in, there are overt attempts to balance popular non-Native ideology with Native perspectives, such as the Navajo Tribe's stance that the Bering Strait land-bridge theory is a fabrication used to justify westward expansion. For a more focused look at any of these individual cultures, the "Indians of North America" series (Chelsea) is a better choice. This regional overview is a serviceable introduction for most students. Black-and-white photos and reproductions appear throughout.-Sean George, St. Charles Parish Library, Luling, LA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.