Cover image for Elizabethan drama
Title:
Elizabethan drama
Author:
Egendorf, Laura K., 1973-
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Greenhaven Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
189 pages ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780737702057

9780737702040
Format :
Book

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PR653 .E643 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, dramatists such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, and Ben Jonson, wrote plays that have remained popular and influential for more than four centuries. The authors in this volume analyze the development of Elizabethan drama and the themes found in plays such as Hamlet and Tamburlaine the Great. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Summary

During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, dramatists such as William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, and Ben Jonson, wrote plays that have remained popular and influential for more than four centuries. The authors in this volume analyze the development of Elizabethan drama and the themes found in plays such as Hamlet and Tamburlaine the Great. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Author Notes

Chris Smith was born in 1970 and attended University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Graduate Film Program in 1995 after completing his film American Job. He met Mark Borchardt while editing American Job, and began filming a documentary about the making of Mark's psychological thriller Coven. Both films played at the Sundance Film Festival, and American Movie won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary. Sony bought the picture for $1 million. In 2016 Chris collaborated with Jon Stewart on the book The Daily Show: An Oral History as Told by Jon Stewart, the Correspondents, Staff and Guests which made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Chris Smith was born in 1970 and attended University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee's Graduate Film Program in 1995 after completing his film American Job. He met Mark Borchardt while editing American Job, and began filming a documentary about the making of Mark's psychological thriller Coven. Both films played at the Sundance Film Festival, and American Movie won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary. Sony bought the picture for $1 million. In 2016 Chris collaborated with Jon Stewart on the book The Daily Show: An Oral History as Told by Jon Stewart, the Correspondents, Staff and Guests which made The New York Times Best Seller List.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Choice Review

The criticism reprinted here has been "edited for ease of comprehension" with the aim of giving young adult readers the necessary cultural and historical background for understanding Elizabethan drama, including Shakespeare. Egendorf selected familiar and important pieces, but only five of them were written within the last 20 years. John Addington Symonds's 1887 description of Elizabethan drama is dated and overly romantic, and E.E. Stoll's discussion of Elizabethan antisemitism (first published in 1927; undated in this volume) does not address post-Holocaust concerns about reading works with antisemitic elements. Several lapses mar the initial historical overview. For example, the editor does not qualify her statement that "women, including the queen herself, sometimes attended the theater" by explaining that plays were produced for Elizabeth at court. And Egendorf's reference to gallants sitting on the stage follows Symonds and does not reflect current understanding that this happened at the enclosed theaters like Blackfriars, but not at the public amphitheaters like the Globe. Worst of all, Egendorf leaves the impression that most scholars regard Shakespeare's authorship of his works as an unresolved question. Beginning undergraduates need, and deserve, more currency and accuracy. Not recommended for academic collections. B. E. Brandt; South Dakota State University


Choice Review

The criticism reprinted here has been "edited for ease of comprehension" with the aim of giving young adult readers the necessary cultural and historical background for understanding Elizabethan drama, including Shakespeare. Egendorf selected familiar and important pieces, but only five of them were written within the last 20 years. John Addington Symonds's 1887 description of Elizabethan drama is dated and overly romantic, and E.E. Stoll's discussion of Elizabethan antisemitism (first published in 1927; undated in this volume) does not address post-Holocaust concerns about reading works with antisemitic elements. Several lapses mar the initial historical overview. For example, the editor does not qualify her statement that "women, including the queen herself, sometimes attended the theater" by explaining that plays were produced for Elizabeth at court. And Egendorf's reference to gallants sitting on the stage follows Symonds and does not reflect current understanding that this happened at the enclosed theaters like Blackfriars, but not at the public amphitheaters like the Globe. Worst of all, Egendorf leaves the impression that most scholars regard Shakespeare's authorship of his works as an unresolved question. Beginning undergraduates need, and deserve, more currency and accuracy. Not recommended for academic collections. B. E. Brandt; South Dakota State University


Table of Contents

John Addington SymondsJohn WassonMadeleine DoranD.J. PalmerJonas A. BarishMarianne NovyJuliet DusinberreRudolph ShawElmer Edgar StollGermaine GreerBrian ArkinsMuriel BradbrookNorthrop FryeMadelon Gholke SprengnetherPaul A. JorgensenFelix E. SchellingAlan C. DessenA.L. RowseGary TaylorJohn Addington SymondsJohn WassonMadeleine DoranD.J. PalmerJonas A. BarishMarianne NovyJuliet DusinberreRudolph ShawElmer Edgar StollGermaine GreerBrian ArkinsMuriel BradbrookNorthrop FryeMadelon Gholke SprengnetherPaul A. JorgensenFelix E. SchellingAlan C. DessenA.L. RowseGary Taylor
Forewordp. 9
Introductionp. 11
A Historical Overview of Elizabethan Dramap. 14
Chapter 1 The Characteristics of Elizabethan Drama
1. Elizabethan Drama Reflects the Atmosphere of the English Renaissancep. 29
2. Elizabethan Drama Exhibits Medieval Influencesp. 35
3. Common Plots in Elizabethan Dramap. 44
4. The Tragic Hero in Elizabethan Dramap. 52
5. Multiple Scenes, Characters, and Plots in Elizabethan Dramap. 61
Chapter 2 Elizabethan Drama as a Reflection of Elizabethan Society
1. Shakespeare's Portrayal of the Elizabethan Familyp. 70
2. Puritanism and Its Impact on the Depiction of Women in Elizabethan Dramap. 79
3. Othello Questions Some Elizabethan Racial Stereotypesp. 88
4. Anti-Semitism in Elizabethan Dramap. 98
5. History Plays United English Societyp. 104
Chapter 3 An Examination of William Shakespeare
1. Seneca's Influence on Shakespearean Tragediesp. 110
2. The Impact of Christopher Marlowe on the Works of Shakespearep. 118
3. Shakespeare's Comedic Stylep. 126
4. Violence Toward Women in Shakespearep. 133
5. Hamlet and Elizabethan Views Concerning Idlenessp. 139
Chapter 4 Assessing Elizabethan Drama
1. Elizabethan Drama Has Stood the Test of Timep. 147
2. Problems with Modern Productions of Elizabethan Dramap. 152
3. The Continuing Influence of William Shakespearep. 159
4. Shakespeare's Importance Has Been Overstatedp. 166
Chronologyp. 172
For Further Researchp. 177
Indexp. 181
Forewordp. 9
Introductionp. 11
A Historical Overview of Elizabethan Dramap. 14
Chapter 1 The Characteristics of Elizabethan Drama
1. Elizabethan Drama Reflects the Atmosphere of the English Renaissancep. 29
2. Elizabethan Drama Exhibits Medieval Influencesp. 35
3. Common Plots in Elizabethan Dramap. 44
4. The Tragic Hero in Elizabethan Dramap. 52
5. Multiple Scenes, Characters, and Plots in Elizabethan Dramap. 61
Chapter 2 Elizabethan Drama as a Reflection of Elizabethan Society
1. Shakespeare's Portrayal of the Elizabethan Familyp. 70
2. Puritanism and Its Impact on the Depiction of Women in Elizabethan Dramap. 79
3. Othello Questions Some Elizabethan Racial Stereotypesp. 88
4. Anti-Semitism in Elizabethan Dramap. 98
5. History Plays United English Societyp. 104
Chapter 3 An Examination of William Shakespeare
1. Seneca's Influence on Shakespearean Tragediesp. 110
2. The Impact of Christopher Marlowe on the Works of Shakespearep. 118
3. Shakespeare's Comedic Stylep. 126
4. Violence Toward Women in Shakespearep. 133
5. Hamlet and Elizabethan Views Concerning Idlenessp. 139
Chapter 4 Assessing Elizabethan Drama
1. Elizabethan Drama Has Stood the Test of Timep. 147
2. Problems with Modern Productions of Elizabethan Dramap. 152
3. The Continuing Influence of William Shakespearep. 159
4. Shakespeare's Importance Has Been Overstatedp. 166
Chronologyp. 172
For Further Researchp. 177
Indexp. 181