Cover image for American realism
Title:
American realism
Author:
Smith, Christopher, 1963-
Publication Information:
San Diego, CA : Greenhaven Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
208 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780737703238

9780737703245
Format :
Book

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Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PS169.R43 A55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Lackawanna Library PS169.R43 A55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Essays discuss the movement's characteristics; the emergence of naturalism; issues of class, race, and gender; the portrayal of American character; and the continuing influences of Realism in the modern era. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.


Author Notes

Chris Smith is a wildlife artist living in Interlochen, MI. He has illustrated over a dozen books & is the contributing artist for the "Retriever Journal" & "Pointing Dog Journal", & co-author of "Waterfowling Horizons", a book about modern waterfowling methods.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Chris Smith is a wildlife artist living in Interlochen, MI. He has illustrated over a dozen books & is the contributing artist for the "Retriever Journal" & "Pointing Dog Journal", & co-author of "Waterfowling Horizons", a book about modern waterfowling methods.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Smith provides a clear, scholarly introduction to the main ideas, subjects, and literary works identified with realism, the dominant movement in American literary history of the post-Civil War era. Fifteen essays--including classic studies by Edwin Cady, Everett Carter, and Donald Pizer--cover a wide range of topics, including the relation of realism to naturalism, sentimentalism, and regionalism; the importance of realism to women writers and African American writers; and treatment by realists of such subjects as the frontier, the city, money, immigration, and racial conflict. The volume is weighted toward early criticism--the majority of essays and works cited in the bibliography were published before 1990--but work of the last decade is represented by essays by several prominent critics: William L. Andrews, David Shi, Eric Sundquist, and Cecelia Tichi. The contributors illustrate the art and ideas of realists in detailed analyses of novels by Howells, James, Crane, Chestnutt, Jewett, and Twain, among others. A succinct statement of the critic's argument precedes each essay. Smith supplies a chronology of events (1859-1920) and a comprehensive introductory essay that places realism in historical context and defines key terms. A useful resource for upper-division undergraduates through faculty, this volume is particularly recommended for beginning undergraduates, who will find it readily accessible. E. Nettels; emeritus, College of William and Mary


Table of Contents

Harold H. Kolb Jr.Everett CarterEdwin H. CadyRichard LehanCharles C. WalcuttDonald PizerRobert ShulmanWilliam L. AndrewsCecelia TichiAlfred KazinEric J. SundquistJames K. FolsomAnthony Channell HilferSidney H. BremerDavid E. ShiHarold H. Kolb Jr.Everett CarterEdwin H. CadyRichard LehanCharles C. WalcuttDonald PizerRobert ShulmanWilliam L. AndrewsCecelia TichiAlfred KazinEric J. SundquistJames K. FolsomAnthony Channell HilferSidney H. BremerDavid E. Shi
Forewordp. 6
Introductionp. 8
A Historical Overview of American Realismp. 10
Chapter 1 Defining Realism
1. The Moral and Thematic Concerns of American Realismp. 37
2. Realism Rejected Sentimental Culturep. 47
3. Realism Reflects a Common Vision of Everyday Lifep. 56
Chapter 2 The Rise of Naturalism
1. The Biological Model: Darwin, Zola, and American Naturalismp. 69
2. The Dual Nature of Naturalismp. 79
3. Naturalism in Three Classic American Novelsp. 88
Chapter 3 Class, Race, and Gender in American Realism
1. The Implications of Wealth in Two Realist Novelsp. 100
2. Realism and the African-American Novelp. 111
3. Women Writers and Women Characters in American Realismp. 121
4. Jack London, Upton Sinclair, and the Progressive Movementp. 133
Chapter 4 National Character in American Realism
1. Realism and Regional Voicesp. 144
2. The Image of the Frontier in American Realismp. 156
3. The Small Town in American Realismp. 166
4. The Rise of the City in American Realismp. 176
Chapter 5 Realism After 1914
1. American Realism in the Postmodern Agep. 187
Chronologyp. 194
For Further Researchp. 199
Indexp. 201
Forewordp. 6
Introductionp. 8
A Historical Overview of American Realismp. 10
Chapter 1 Defining Realism
1. The Moral and Thematic Concerns of American Realismp. 37
2. Realism Rejected Sentimental Culturep. 47
3. Realism Reflects a Common Vision of Everyday Lifep. 56
Chapter 2 The Rise of Naturalism
1. The Biological Model: Darwin, Zola, and American Naturalismp. 69
2. The Dual Nature of Naturalismp. 79
3. Naturalism in Three Classic American Novelsp. 88
Chapter 3 Class, Race, and Gender in American Realism
1. The Implications of Wealth in Two Realist Novelsp. 100
2. Realism and the African-American Novelp. 111
3. Women Writers and Women Characters in American Realismp. 121
4. Jack London, Upton Sinclair, and the Progressive Movementp. 133
Chapter 4 National Character in American Realism
1. Realism and Regional Voicesp. 144
2. The Image of the Frontier in American Realismp. 156
3. The Small Town in American Realismp. 166
4. The Rise of the City in American Realismp. 176
Chapter 5 Realism After 1914
1. American Realism in the Postmodern Agep. 187
Chronologyp. 194
For Further Researchp. 199
Indexp. 201

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