Cover image for Dear poppa : the World War II Berman family letters
Title:
Dear poppa : the World War II Berman family letters
Author:
Berman, Ruth, 1942-
Publication Information:
St. Paul : Minnesota Historical Society Press, [1997]

©1997
Physical Description:
xxii, 314 : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780873513579

9780873513586
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library D810.C4 D347 1997 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

David, Betsy, and Sammy Berman were nine, six and four years old in May 1943 when the US Army sent their father, Dr Reuben Berman, to Europe. Over the next two and a half years, the children regularly gathered around their mother, Isabel Berman, in their Minneapolis home while she typed exactly what they wanted to say to their father. This collection of more than 340 letters, selected from more than a thousand exchanged by the Berman family via V-mail, captures the anxiety and loss that children experienced when their father left for war.


Summary

David, Betsy, and Sammy Berman were nine, six, and four years old in May 1943 when the U.S. Army sent their father, Dr. Reuben Berman, to Europe. Over the next two and a half years, the children regularly gathered around their mother, Isabel, in their Minneapolis home while she typed exactly what they wanted to say to their father. This collection of more than 340 letters, selected from more than a thousand exchanged by the Berman family via V-mail, captures the anxiety and loss that children experienced when their fathers left for war.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Millions of men were drafted into the US armed forces to achieve victory in WW II, among them, a Minneapolis physician named Reuben Berman. Entering the army in the summer of 1941, Berman did not return home until the fall of 1945. For roughly the first half of his service, he was fortunate enough to have his family--his wife Isabel (who earned a doctorate in psychology from the University of Minnesota) and his children--near him at bases in Texas, Kentucky, and Florida. In the spring of 1943, Berman was sent to the UK, while Isabel and the four children settled down in Minneapolis. The closely knit family exchanged an incredible volume of letters; in her note of May 17, 1944, Isabel suggested the possibility of publication at some future date. Now, more than a half century later and, sadly, years after her death, some of the Berman family letters have been gathered in this volume. Most of the letters are from the children to Reuben, although Isabel wrote frequently. They tell the story of a family living as normal a life as possible under the circumstances; schoolwork, the children's progress, and childhood diseases are chronicled along with information about paper drives and victory gardens. One comes away from the book impressed with the Bermans and amazed at how well they lived in the midst of a great war. Those interested in family history, Judaica, and the war will enjoy Dear Poppa. Numerous illustrations, an introduction, a prelude and postlude, and a family genealogy. General readers. C. L. Egan University of Houston


Choice Review

Millions of men were drafted into the US armed forces to achieve victory in WW II, among them, a Minneapolis physician named Reuben Berman. Entering the army in the summer of 1941, Berman did not return home until the fall of 1945. For roughly the first half of his service, he was fortunate enough to have his family--his wife Isabel (who earned a doctorate in psychology from the University of Minnesota) and his children--near him at bases in Texas, Kentucky, and Florida. In the spring of 1943, Berman was sent to the UK, while Isabel and the four children settled down in Minneapolis. The closely knit family exchanged an incredible volume of letters; in her note of May 17, 1944, Isabel suggested the possibility of publication at some future date. Now, more than a half century later and, sadly, years after her death, some of the Berman family letters have been gathered in this volume. Most of the letters are from the children to Reuben, although Isabel wrote frequently. They tell the story of a family living as normal a life as possible under the circumstances; schoolwork, the children's progress, and childhood diseases are chronicled along with information about paper drives and victory gardens. One comes away from the book impressed with the Bermans and amazed at how well they lived in the midst of a great war. Those interested in family history, Judaica, and the war will enjoy Dear Poppa. Numerous illustrations, an introduction, a prelude and postlude, and a family genealogy. General readers. C. L. Egan University of Houston


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