Cover image for Direct current fundamentals
Title:
Direct current fundamentals
Author:
Loper, Orla E.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Sixth edition.
Publication Information:
[South] Africa ; Albany, NY : Delmar, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xix, 476 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780766809598
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TK1111 .L66 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Direct Current Fundamentals, 6E is by far the best and most reliable selection for comprehensive DC theories and applications. This comprehensive book on DC information includes many examples of basic DC circuits and equipment providing users with the fundamental concepts of DC electricity and magnetism, in preparation for further studies in electricity and electronics.


Table of Contents

Preface
Chapter 1 An Introduction to Electricity and Electronicsp. 1
1-1 What are electricity and electronics?
1-2 Why this book is called Direct Current Fundamentals
1-3 Early history of electricity
1-4 One hundred elements--building blocks of nature
1-5 The atom analyzed--electrons, protons, and neutrons
1-6 The atomic theory--cornerstone of electrical theory
Chapter 2 Electricity Production and Usep. 12
2-1 Electricity production by energy conversion
2-2 Electricity from friction
2-3 Electricity from magnetism
2-4 Electricity from chemical energy
2-5 Electricity from light
2-6 Electricity from heat
2-7 Electricity from mechanical pressure: piezoelectricity
2-8 The effects of electricity
Chapter 3 Electrostaticsp. 21
3-1 Stationary electrons
3-2 Electroscopes
3-3 Electrostatic induction
3-4 Lightning
3-5 Nuisance static charges
3-6 Useful static charges
3-7 Potential energy of electrons
3-8 Electric lines of force
Chapter 4 Basic Circuit Conceptsp. 36
4-1 Three measurable circuit quantities
4-2 Voltage
4-3 Current
4-4 Resistance
4-5 A simple electric circuit
4-6 Open circuits and closed circuits
4-7 The schematic diagram
4-8 Basic circuit notation
4-9 The short circuit
4-10 Electrical safety
4-11 National Electrical Code
Chapter 5 Scientific Notation and Metric Prefixesp. 49
5-1 Rationale for studying this unit
5-2 Powers of 10
5-3 Scientific notation
5-4 Significant digits
5-5 Rounding off to three significant digits
5-6 Metric prefixes
5-7 Multiplication and division with powers of 10
Chapter 6 Electrical Quantity Measurementp. 63
6-1 Types of meters
6-2 Ammeter and voltmeter scale interpretation
6-3 Ohmmeter scale interpretation
6-4 Electrical meter connection
Chapter 7 Resistancep. 80
7-1 Conductance vs. resistance
7-2 Resistivity of materials
7-3 Length of a conductor
7-4 Cross-sectional area (CSA) of a conductor in circular mils
7-5 Effect of temperature on resistance
7-6 The American Wire Gauge (AWG)
7-7 Stranded wire and cable
7-8 Commercial resistors
Chapter 8 Ohm's Lawp. 99
8-1 Voltage, current, and resistance
8-2 Ohm's law with metric prefixes
Chapter 9 Electrical Power and Energyp. 104
9-1 Energy
9-2 Units of energy
9-3 Power
9-4 Energy and cost calculations
9-5 Efficiency of energy conversion
9-6 A practical application--resistance heating
Chapter 10 Series Circuitsp. 122
10-1 Characteristics of series circuits
10-2 The voltage drop
10-3 Resistance and current in series circuits
10-4 Power consumption in series circuits
10-5 Calculation of series circuit quantities
10-6 Voltage drop on a line
10-7 Voltage at an open element
10-8 Series circuits as voltage dividers
10-9 Polarity considerations
10-10 Ground as a reference point
10-11 Voltage sources in series
Chapter 11 Parallel Circuitsp. 150
11-1 The nature of parallel circuits
11-2 Five methods of computation
(a) Use of Ohm's Law for computing R[subscript T]
(b) Use of the reciprocal equation
(c) A practical method
(d) The product over the sum formula
(e) A special condition: all equal resistors
11-3 Power dissipation in parallel circuits
11-4 Voltage sources in parallel
11-5 A practical application--kitchen range heating element
Chapter 12 Series-Parallel Circuits and Loaded Voltage Dividersp. 169
12-1 Simplifying series-parallel circuits
12-2 Kirchhoff's voltage law
12-3 Kirchhoff's current law
12-4 Loaded voltage dividers
Chapter 13 Conduction in Liquid and Gasesp. 192
13-1 The ionization process
13-2 Useful chemical compounds
13-3 Electroplating and electrolysis
13-4 Gases as insulators
13-5 Gaseous conduction by ionization
13-6 Conduction and ions in nature
13-7 Conduction in a vacuum
Chapter 14 Batteriesp. 208
14-1 Chemical energy: a source of emf
14-2 Anodes and cathodes
14-3 Primary cells
14-4 Fuel cells
14-5 Secondary cells
14-6 Maintenance-free batteries
14-7 Miscellaneous aspects of batteries
Chapter 15 Magnetism and Electromagnetismp. 234
15-1 Electricity and magnetism
15-2 Simple magnets
15-3 The magnetic field
15-4 Ferromagnetic materials and the magnetizing process
15-5 Magnetic materials and the atomic theory
15-6 Permanent magnets
15-7 Electromagnetism of a straight wire
15-8 Electromagnetism of a coil
15-9 The magnetic core in the coil
15-10 Magnetic quantities
Chapter 16 Applications of Electromagnetismp. 256
16-1 Solenoids for lateral motion
16-2 The electromagnetic relay
16-3 Magnetic vibrators and bell
16-4 Electromagnetism for rotational motion
16-5 Other applications of the motor effect
16-6 Electromagnetism at work
Chapter 17 Electrical Measuring Instruments (Another Application of Electromagnetism)p. 268
17-1 d'Arsonval meters
17-2 DC ammeters
17-3 Multirange ammeters
17-4 Voltmeters
17-5 Ohmmeters
17-6 Megohmmeters
17-7 Wattmeters
17-8 Wheatstone bridges
17-9 Clamp-on meters
Chapter 18 Electromagnetic Inductionp. 289
18-1 Moving coils--stationary fields
18-2 Moving fields--stationary coils
18-3 Left-hand rule for generators
18-4 Lenz's law
18-5 Induction in rotating machines
Chapter 19 DC Generatorsp. 302
19-1 Principles of DC generators
19-2 Armature design
19-3 Generator field structures
19-4 Armature reaction
19-5 Buildup of self-excited fields
19-6 Three types of self-excited generators (series, shunt, and compound)
19-7 Separately excited generators
19-8 Generator calculations
19-9 Power losses
19-10 Generator data and ratings
19-11 Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation
Chapter 20 Mechanical Motion From Electrical Energyp. 338
20-1 Basic motor action
20-2 Torque and rotary motion
20-3 The need for commutation
20-4 The need for added armature coils
20-5 From torque to horsepower
Chapter 21 DC Motorsp. 352
21-1 DC machines: motor or generator?
21-2 The counter-emf in a motor
21-3 Armature windings
21-4 Field distortion and the need for interpoles
21-5 The shunt motor
21-6 The series motor
21-7 The compound motor
21-8 Speed control of DC motors
21-9 Reversal of rotation
21-10 Power losses
21-11 Permanent magnet motors
Chapter 22 Starters and Speed Controllersp. 382
22-1 Trends in motor control
22-2 The need for reduced-voltage starting
22-3 Manual starters
22-4 Manual speed controllers
22-5 Starters for series motors
22-6 Drum controllers
22-7 Magnetic controllers
22-8 The counter-electromotive force motor controller
22-9 The voltage drop acceleration controller (lockout acceleration)
22-10 Definite time controller
22-11 Electronic controllers
Chapter 23 Solving DC Networksp. 417
23-1 The loop current method
23-2 The superposition theorem
23-3 Thevenin's theorem
Appendixp. 435
Glossaryp. 455
Selected Answers to Odd-Numbered Problemsp. 463
Indexp. 471

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