Cover image for The new X Window system : a complete Internet architecture
Title:
The new X Window system : a complete Internet architecture
Author:
Bowman, Charles F.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Reading, Mass. : Addison Wesley, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xx, 153 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780201184631
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library QA76.76.W56 B6785 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The X Windows Systems for displaying graphical user interfaces on UNIX and Linux systems has just been re-architected to support enterprise-class distributed applications across LANs, WANs, and the Internet. This authoritative guide is the first book to the new X Windows System, code-named Broadway, and officially titled X11R6.3. The book contains more than 50 figures and illustrations demonstrating Broadway enterprise solutions--with corresponding sample code available on the Web.


Author Notes

Charles F. Bowman , a respected authority with more than twenty years of experience in UNIX and X environments, is the former Editor of The X Journal . He is the author of several books, among them Objectifying Motif .



020118463XAB04062001


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xix
Chapter 1 The Future of Computingp. 1
1.1 The Internetp. 1
1.2 New Development Objectivesp. 2
1.2.1 Enhanced Transaction Processingp. 2
1.2.2 Portable Clients and Serversp. 2
1.2.3 24 Time 7 Availabilityp. 3
1.2.4 Enhanced Datasetsp. 3
1.3 Why Now?p. 3
1.4 The New Wave of Computingp. 4
1.4.1 Distributed Architecturesp. 4
1.4.2 Object Orientationp. 7
1.4.3 Business Objectsp. 7
1.4.4 Distributed Objectsp. 8
1.4.5 Componentwarep. 8
1.5 New Design Goalsp. 9
1.5.1 Thin Clientsp. 9
1.5.2 Internet Applicationsp. 11
1.6 Summaryp. 11
Chapter 2 The Story of Xp. 13
2.1 The X Window Systemp. 14
2.1.1 A Brief History of Xp. 14
2.2 The Architecture of Xp. 15
2.2.1 Design Goalsp. 15
2.2.2 True Client/Serverp. 15
2.2.3 The X Protocolp. 16
2.2.4 The Advent of Widgetsp. 16
2.2.5 Where Was X Successful?p. 17
2.2.6 Why Was X Successful?p. 17
2.3 X: Back to the Futurep. 18
2.4 Summaryp. 19
Chapter 3 Broadway: The Nickel Tourp. 21
3.1 Universal Accessp. 21
3.2 On Broadwayp. 23
3.2.1 Standardsp. 23
3.2.2 Design Goalsp. 24
3.2.3 Distributed Architecturesp. 24
3.2.4 Broadway's Architecturep. 25
3.2.5 Program Downloadingp. 25
3.3 Broadway's Componentsp. 25
3.3.1 Low-Bandwidth X (LBX)p. 26
3.3.2 Browser Embeddingp. 27
3.3.3 Broadway Securityp. 28
3.3.4 Miscellaneous Featuresp. 28
3.4 Why Use Broadway?p. 29
3.4.1 Broadway's Advantagesp. 29
3.4.2 Broadway in the Marketplacep. 29
3.5 Summaryp. 31
Chapter 4 X on the Webp. 33
4.1 Program Downloadingp. 33
4.2 HTML Overview and Reviewp. 34
4.3 Broadway and Browsersp. 36
4.4 Implementation Requirementsp. 38
4.4.1 Broadway HTTP/HTML Extensionsp. 38
4.4.2 Browser Requirementsp. 39
4.5 Sample Applicationp. 42
4.5.1 Web Server Administrationp. 42
4.5.2 Browser Administrationp. 42
4.5.3 Application Filesp. 43
4.6 Bandwidth and Performancep. 50
4.6.1 Traditional X Performancep. 50
4.6.2 Low-Bandwidth Xp. 51
4.7 Security Issuesp. 52
4.7.1 Security Threatsp. 52
4.7.2 Traditional X (In) Securityp. 52
4.7.3 Broadway Securityp. 54
4.8 Summaryp. 54
Chapter 5 Broadway's Interoperabilityp. 55
5.1 The Birth of Javap. 55
5.2 Java's Featuresp. 56
5.2.1 Simplicityp. 56
5.2.2 Object Orientedp. 56
5.2.3 Compiled versus Interpretedp. 56
5.2.4 Garbage Collectionp. 57
5.2.5 Portabilityp. 57
5.2.6 Architectural Neutralityp. 57
5.2.7 Performancep. 57
5.2.8 Security Issuesp. 57
5.2.9 Multithreadingp. 58
5.2.10 The Java Virtual Machinep. 58
5.3 Using Javap. 58
5.3.1 Portability in the Real Worldp. 59
5.3.2 GUI Variationsp. 59
5.3.3 Securityp. 59
5.3.4 The Cost of Recodingp. 60
5.3.5 Lack of Controlp. 60
5.4 On Broadwayp. 61
5.4.1 Why Open the Play at All?p. 61
5.4.2 Is Broadway Secure?p. 61
5.4.3 Is Broadway Fast?p. 62
5.4.4 X and the Internetp. 62
5.4.5 Broadway and Intranetsp. 62
5.5 Microsoft Windows NT Terminal Server Editionp. 62
5.5.1 TS Overviewp. 63
5.5.2 TS On Broadwayp. 64
5.6 Summaryp. 64
Appendix A Application Group Extension to the X Protocolp. 65
A.1 Purpose and Goalsp. 66
A.2 Overview of the Protocolp. 66
A.3 Requestsp. 66
A.3.1 AppGroupQueryVersionp. 66
A.3.2 AppGrouCreatep. 67
A.3.3 AppGroupDestroyp. 68
A.3.4 AppGroupGetAttrp. 69
A.3.5 AppGroupQueryp. 69
A.3.6 AppGroupCreateAssociationp. 69
A.3.7 AppGroupDestroy Associationp. 69
A.4 Changes to Existing Requestsp. 70
A.4.1 MapWindowp. 70
A.4.2 ConfigureWindowp. 70
A.4.3 CreateWindowp. 70
A.4.4 ChangeWindowAttributesp. 70
A.5 Changes to Existing Eventsp. 70
A.5.1 MapRequestp. 71
A.5.2 ConfigureRequestp. 71
A.6 Errorsp. 71
A.6.1 AppGroupQueryVersionp. 71
A.6.2 AppGroupCreatep. 71
A.6.3 AppGroupDestroyp. 72
A.6.4 AppGroupGetAttrp. 72
A.6.5 AppGroupQueryp. 72
A.6.6 AppGroupCreateAssociationp. 72
A.6.7 AppGroupDestroy Associationp. 72
A.7 Encodingp. 72
A.7.1 AppGroupQueryVersionp. 72
A.7.2 AppGroupCreatep. 73
A.7.3 AppGroupDestroyp. 73
A.7.4 AppGroupGetAttrp. 73
A.7.5 AppGroupQueryp. 74
A.7.6 AppGroupCreateAssocp. 74
A.7.7 AppGroupDestroy Assocp. 74
A.8 Library Application Programming Interfacep. 75
A.8.1 Status XagQueryVersion(p. 75
A.8.2 Status XagCreateEmbeddedApplicationGroup(p. 75
A.8.3 Status XagCreateNonembeddedApplicationGroup(p. 76
A.8.4 Status XagDestroyApplicationGroup(p. 76
A.8.5 Status XagGetApplicationGroupAttributes(p. 76
A.8.6 Status XagQueryApplicationGroup(p. 77
A.8.7 Status XagCreateAssociation(p. 77
A.8.8 Status XagDestroyAssociation(p. 78
A.9 System Window Encodingsp. 78
A.9.1 AppGroupCreateAssoc (X11)p. 78
A.9.2 AppGroupCreateAssoc (Macintosh)p. 79
A.9.3 AppGroupCreateAssoc (Win32)p. 79
A.9.4 AppGroupCreateAssoc (Win 16)p. 79
Appendix B Low-Bandwidth X Extensionp. 81
B.1 Descriptionp. 82
B.1.1 Data Flowp. 82
B.1.2 Tagsp. 82
B.1.3 Short-Circuitingp. 83
B.1.4 Graphics Reencodingp. 84
B.1.5 Motion Eventsp. 84
B.1.6 Event Squishingp. 85
B.1.7 Master Clientp. 85
B.1.8 Multiplexing of Clientsp. 85
B.1.9 Swappingp. 85
B.1.10 Delta Cachep. 85
B.1.11 Stream Compressionp. 86
B.1.12 Authentication Protocolsp. 86
B.2 C Library Interfacesp. 87
B.2.1 Application Library Interfacesp. 87
B.2.2 Proxy Library Interfacesp. 87
B.3 Protocolp. 88
B.3.1 Syntactic Conventions and Common Typesp. 88
B.3.2 Errorsp. 90
B.3.3 Requestsp. 90
B.3.4 Eventsp. 110
B.3.5 Responsesp. 112
B.4 Algorithm Namingp. 112
B.5 Encodingp. 113
B.5.1 Eventsp. 130
B.5.2 Reencoding of X Eventsp. 133
B.5.3 Responsesp. 134
Appendix C The RX Documentp. 135
C.1 Notational Conventions and Generic Grammarp. 136
C.2 The RX MIME Typep. 137
C.2.1 General Formp. 137
C.2.2 Parametersp. 137
C.2.3 Returned Parametersp. 139
C.3 How the RX Document Will Be Used in the X Window Systemp. 139
C.3.1 Parametersp. 139
C.3.2 Returned Parametersp. 140
C.3.3 Examplep. 141
C.4 Referencesp. 142
Indexp. 143

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