Cover image for National Audubon Society The Sibley guide to birds
Title:
National Audubon Society The Sibley guide to birds
Author:
Sibley, David, 1961-
Personal Author:
Edition:
A Chanticleer Press edition, first edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 2000.
Physical Description:
544 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 25 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
ISBN:
9780679451228
Format :
Book

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On Order

Summary

Summary

David Allen Sibley, America's most gifted contemporary painter of birds, is the author and illustrator of this comprehensive guide. His beautifully detailed illustrations-more than 6,600 in all-and descriptions of 810 species and 350 regional populations will enrich every birder's experience.

The Sibley Guide 's innovative design makes it entirely user friendly. The illustrations are arranged to facilitate comparison, yet still capture the unique character of each species.

The Sibley Guide to Birds provides a wealth of new information:
-Captioned illustrations show many previously unpublished field marks and revisions of known marks
-Nearly every species is shown in flight
-Measurements include length, wingspan, and weight for every species
-Subspecies and geographic varients are covered thoroughly
-Complete voice descriptions are included for every species
-Maps show the complete distribution of every species: summer and winter ranges, migration routes, and rare occurrences

Both novice and experienced birders will appreciate these and other innovative features:
-An introductory page for each family or group of related families makes comparisons simple
-Clear and concise labels with pointers identify field marks directly
-Birds are illustrated in similar poses to make comparisons between species quick and easy
-Illustrations emphasize the way birds look in the field

With The Sibley Guide to Birds , the National Audubon Society makes the art and expertise of David Sibley available to the world in a comprehensive, handsome, easy-to-use volume that will be the indispensable identification guide every birder must own.


Author Notes

David Allen Sibley, son of the well-known ornithologist Fred Sibley, began seriously watching and drawing birds in 1969, at age seven. Since 1980, he has traveled throughout the North American continent studying the natural world, both on his own and as a leader of bird-watching tours. He is the author of several guides to bird identification including The Sibley Guide to Birds, The Sibley Guide to Bird Life and Behavior, Sibley's Birding Basics, The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America, and The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Western North America.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Publisher's Weekly Review

The bird-watching world knows Sibley best as an immensely talented painter. His thick, attractive and data-packed color guide offers nearly 7,000 images, along with range maps and detailed descriptions of songs, calls and voices, for all the birds North Americans might see. It's a more informative volume than Kenn Kaufman's forthcoming Birds of North America (Forecasts, Sept. 11) but less portable and harder for beginners to use. An introduction describes the key parts of major classes of birdsDthe tomia and culmen of a gull's bill, the scapulars and coverts of passerines (songbirds). Sibley then moves on to hundreds of pages of birds in 42 categories, from Loons and Grebes to Silky Flycatchers and Bulbuls. A typical page has two columns, with one species in each: that species gets a color-coded range map, a description of its voice, and four to eight illustrative paintings. These multiple images of single species are the guide's most attractive feature; they let Sibley show some birds in several poses, as well as important seasonal and regional, juvenile and mature, breeding and nonbreeding, or male and female versions of the same bird. (Gulls, terns, and many other seabirds, in particular, change their patterns completely when breeding.) Sibley assists viewers by giving, on the same page, images of species that might be mistaken for one anotherDone column shows 13 kinds of thrushes. He also describes calls for every bird (not just the more common ones), and makes many more comparisons. If Kaufman's guide belongs in birders' coat pockets, Sibley's big, detailed book belongs on their desks; it's easy to imagine birders rushing to Sibley's guide to check details of plumage or to confirm an ID the smaller guide has helped them make. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

The "Peterson Field Guides" series have long served as the benchmark for field guides. Now come two new birding titles that certainly meet the Peterson standard of excellence, with such features as basic information, range maps, voice descriptions, comparisons with similar species, scientific and common name indexes, the specification of field marks, and the inclusion of exotics. Rather than using the typical drawings and paintings, birding expert and Audubon field editor Kaufman selected over 2000 digitally edited photographs, enhanced to improve contrast, color, and the like. The excellent result will appeal to beginning birders perhaps intimidated by illustrations. In order to make useful comparisons, Kaufman varies the organization a bit from the American Ornithological Union (AOU) standard. Helpful headers, color coded to groups (e.g., wading birds), break down further into categories such as huge waders and waders with odd bills. Kaufman's text is simple and uncluttered, a plus for novices. Noted avian artist Sibley provides more than 6000 detailed illustrations (including pictures of the flying bird from above and below, a first in a birding guide) that are as excellent as Kaufman's photos. His text is far more substantial in detail, including flight patterns, more plumage variations (young juvenile, juvenile, adult) for nearly all the birds, and more detail in range maps. Although it is larger and heavier that Kaufman's title, this guide will serve experienced birders extremely well, However, it might provide more information than a beginner needs. The bottom line: both guides are highly recommended for all collections, Kaufman to serve the novices and the unsure, Sibley to delight the more experienced as well. [Kaufman's book was previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 4/15/00; for more guidance on field guides, see Christina Peterson's "Tracking Nature Field Guides," LJ 6/1/00, p. 83-87.DEd.]DNancy Moeckel, Miami Univ. Libs., Oxford, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

Sibley is widely recognized as a top authority on field identification of North American birds. In 30 years of extensive fieldwork this talented artist accumulated the sketches, notes, and drawings that led to this superbly illustrated guide. The treatments of each of the 810 species have detailed paintings to show the natural variations in plumage (e.g., juveniles, male/female adults, seasonal and geographic changes). In all, there are more than 6,600 full-color illustrations. Clearly, this book is the most comprehensive of any North American field guide for bird life, particularly for the depiction of geographic forms, races, or subspecies. The text for each species has a short summary of identification key points, description of vocalizations, and an up-to-date range map. The size and weight of this volume make it more a reference than a handbook. Its exhaustive details of different plumages will be most appreciated by experienced birders. General readers; undergraduates through faculty. C. Leck; emeritus, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick


Table of Contents

Prefacep. 7
Acknowledgmentsp. 8
Introductionp. 9
Classification of Birdsp. 9
Learning to Identify Birdsp. 9
Variation in Appearancep. 11
Learning Songs and Callsp. 13
Finding Rare Birdsp. 14
Ethicsp. 14
Extinct Speciesp. 14
Bird Topographyp. 15
Parts of a Passerinep. 15
Head Feathersp. 16
Body Feathersp. 17
Wing Feathersp. 18
Parts of a Shorebirdp. 19
Parts of a Duckp. 20
Parts of a Gullp. 20
Molt and Plumagep. 22
North American Birds Species Accounts
Loonsp. 23
Grebesp. 26
Albatrosses, Petrels, and Shearwatersp. 30
Storm-Petrelsp. 41
Pelecaniformesp. 46
Anhinga
Boobies
Cormorants
Frigatebirds
Gannets
Pelicans
Tropicbirds
Cormorants and Anhingap. 50
Identification of Sulidsp. 54
Wading Birdsp. 57
Bitterns
Egrets
Flamingos
Herons
Ibises
Spoonbills
Storks
Identification of White Heronsp. 59
Identification of Dark Ibisesp. 66
Swans, Geese, and Ducksp. 70
Identification of Swansp. 73
Geese Head and Bill Shapesp. 79
Domestic Waterfowlp. 89
Exotic Waterfowlp. 89
Identification of Scaupp. 93
Identification of Eidersp. 93
Diving Motionsp. 97
Identification of Scotersp. 99
Identification of Goldeneyesp. 99
Diurnal Raptorsp. 104
Eagles
Falcons
Hawks
Vultures
Harrier Flight Shapesp. 108
Raptor Hunting Techniquesp. 109
Identification of Accipitersp. 113
Identification of Buteosp. 114
Identification of Falconsp. 128
Upland Game Birdsp. 134
Chachalacas
Grouse
Partridges
Pheasants
Prairie-Chickens
Ptarmigan
Quail
Turkeys
Exotic Game Birdsp. 135
Gruiformesp. 150
Coots
Cranes
Limpkin
Moorthens
Rails
Habits of Railsp. 153
Shorebirdsp. 158
Avocets
Curlews
Dowitchers
Godwits
Jacanas
Lapwings
Oystercatchers
Phalaropes
Plovers
Ruff
Sandpipers
Snipe
Stilts
Turnstones
Willet
Woodcocks
Yellowlegs
Rare Shorebirdsp. 161
Aging and Identification of Shorebirdsp. 181
Identification of Peepsp. 187
Aerial Displays of Snipe and Woodcockp. 193
Identification of Phalaropesp. 194
Jaegers and Skuasp. 196
Jaeger Bill Shapesp. 196
Gulls, Terns, and Skimmersp. 202
Hybrid Gullsp. 204
Identification of Gullsp. 208
Alcidsp. 241
Auklets
Dovekie
Guillemots
Murrelets
Murres
Puffins
Identification of Murresp. 243
Pigeons and Dovesp. 254
Parrots and Their Alliesp. 262
Cuckoos and Their Alliesp. 267
Anis
Cuckoos
Roadrunners
Owlsp. 271
Goatsuckers and Swiftsp. 284
Hummingbirdsp. 292
Identification of Hummingbirdsp. 302
Trogonsp. 303
Kingfishersp. 304
Woodpeckersp. 306
Drumming Soundsp. 306
Tyrant Flycatchersp. 320
Flycatchers
Kingbirds
Pewees
Phoebes
Wood-Pewees
Shrikes and Vireosp. 340
Jays, Crows, and Their Alliesp. 350
Crows
Jays
Magpies
Ravens
Scrub-Jays
Larksp. 362
Open-Ground Birdsp. 362
Swallowsp. 364
Molt in Swallowsp. 364
Chickadees and Their Alliesp. 371
Bushtit
Chickadees
Titmice
Verdin
Drab Gray Birds of the Arid Southwestp. 378
Nuthatches and Creepersp. 380
Wrensp. 384
Scold Notesp. 384
Sedge Wren and Grass Sparrowsp. 388
Old World Warblers, Thrushes, and Their Alliesp. 392
Bluebirds
Dippers
Gnatcatchers
Kinglets
Robins
Thrushes
Warblers
Wrentit
Identification of Gnatcatchersp. 398
Typical Thrushesp. 402
Robinlike Songsp. 403
Mimidsp. 410
Catbirds
Mockingbirds
Thrashers
Starlings and Mynasp. 416
Wagtails and Pipitsp. 418
Silky-Flycatchers and Bulbulsp. 422
Waxwingsp. 423
Wood-Warblersp. 424
Parulas
Redstarts
Warblers
Waterthrushes
Blue-winger [times] Golden-winged Hybridsp. 428
Warbler Plumagesp. 437
Identification of Fall Warblersp. 442
Identifying Songsp. 447
Aberrant Passerinesp. 458
Tanagers, Cardinals, and Their Alliesp. 459
Bananaquit
Cardinaline Buntings
Cardinals
Dickcissel
Grosbeaks
Tanagers
Identification of Tanagersp. 461
Identification of Grosbeaksp. 467
Identification of Cardinaline Buntingsp. 470
Emberizine Sparrows and Their Alliesp. 472
Emberizine Buntings
Juncos
Longspurs
Sparrows
Towhees
Identification of Spizella Sparrowsp. 484
Sparrowlike Birdsp. 492
Identification of Emberizine Buntingsp. 503
Icteridsp. 507
Blackbirds
Bobolink
Cowbirds
Grackles
Meadowlarks
Orioles
Identification of Meadowlarksp. 509
Identification of Oriolesp. 518
Finches and Old World Sparrowsp. 523
Crossbills
Finches
Goldfinches
Grosbeaks
Old World Sparrows
Redpolls
Siskins
Red Crossbill Typesp. 530
Identification of Red Crossbillsp. 531
Exotic Finchesp. 537
Species Indexp. 538