Cover image for Understanding the European Union : a concise introduction
Title:
Understanding the European Union : a concise introduction
Author:
McCormick, John, 1954-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : St. Martin's Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xvii, 251 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Corporate Subject:
ISBN:
9780312221652

9780312221669
Format :
Book

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JN30 .M38 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 2

Choice Review

McCormick claims his book provides a helpful understanding of the European Union(EU), which is necessary since few people know much about it. The author published The European Union: Politics and Policies (1996) but presents the volume under review as more introductory, broad ranging, and more readable than competing books. Yet like so many of these other works, McCormick explains the history of European institutions, the goals and motives behind the idea of Europe, the structure and functioning of the five main institutions of the EU, and the changes it made in the lives of Europeans. In different chapters, he surveys theories on regional integration and shows how the EU is different from conventional international organizations, assesses the relationship between the EU and its member states and the constitutional issues involved, and examines the impact of EU policies on citizenship, culture, workers' rights, and unemployment. He concludes by discussing the attempts to develop a European foreign and defense policy and by examining the EU as the world's newest economic superpower. This is not a work of original scholarship, but it is clearly written and useful as an introduction for undergraduate students. M. Curtis; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick


Choice Review

McCormick claims his book provides a helpful understanding of the European Union(EU), which is necessary since few people know much about it. The author published The European Union: Politics and Policies (1996) but presents the volume under review as more introductory, broad ranging, and more readable than competing books. Yet like so many of these other works, McCormick explains the history of European institutions, the goals and motives behind the idea of Europe, the structure and functioning of the five main institutions of the EU, and the changes it made in the lives of Europeans. In different chapters, he surveys theories on regional integration and shows how the EU is different from conventional international organizations, assesses the relationship between the EU and its member states and the constitutional issues involved, and examines the impact of EU policies on citizenship, culture, workers' rights, and unemployment. He concludes by discussing the attempts to develop a European foreign and defense policy and by examining the EU as the world's newest economic superpower. This is not a work of original scholarship, but it is clearly written and useful as an introduction for undergraduate students. M. Curtis; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick


Table of Contents

List of Boxes, Tables, Figures and Mapsp. viii
List of Abbreviationsp. x
Introductionp. xii
Acknowledgementsp. xix
1 What is the European Union?p. 1
The international systemp. 2
Confederalismp. 6
Federalismp. 9
The logic of integrationp. 12
Functionalismp. 13
Neofunctionalismp. 16
Regional integration around the worldp. 18
The Americasp. 18
Asiap. 21
The Middle Eastp. 23
Africap. 24
Conclusionsp. 25
2 The Idea of Europep. 27
The changing identity of Europep. 28
Where is Europe?p. 36
Europe todayp. 39
Political structuresp. 39
Administrative structuresp. 45
Economic structuresp. 47
Conclusionsp. 50
3 The Evolution of the EUp. 52
Domestic and international backgroundp. 53
First steps towards integration (1945-58)p. 58
The European Economic Community (1958-86)p. 62
Economic and social integration (1979-92)p. 67
From Community to Union (1992-)p. 71
Conclusionsp. 77
4 The Institutions of the EUp. 79
A constitution for Europep. 80
The European Commissionp. 82
The Council of Ministersp. 89
The European Parliamentp. 94
The European Court of Justicep. 99
The European Councilp. 103
Conclusionsp. 106
5 The EU and the Member Statesp. 108
The changing identities of the member statesp. 109
Understanding the policy processp. 115
The politics of the budgetp. 121
The changing character of the EUp. 125
Conclusionsp. 129
6 The EU and its Citizensp. 131
The democratic deficitp. 132
The people's Europep. 139
Participation and representationp. 145
European electionsp. 146
Referendap. 148
Interest groupsp. 150
Improving accountabilityp. 153
Conclusionsp. 155
7 Economic Policyp. 157
The single marketp. 158
Physical barriersp. 159
Fiscal barriersp. 162
Technical barriersp. 163
Effects of the single marketp. 165
Rights of residencep. 165
Joint ventures and corporate mergersp. 165
A European transport systemp. 170
Open skies over Europep. 171
Inside the euro zonep. 173
Conclusionsp. 179
8 Improving the Quality of Lifep. 181
Building an even playing fieldp. 182
Agricultural policyp. 187
Regional policyp. 194
Social policyp. 197
Environmental policyp. 201
Conclusionsp. 206
9 The EU and the Worldp. 208
Building a European foreign policyp. 209
Towards a European defence policyp. 214
Europe as an economic powerp. 220
Relations with the United Statesp. 223
Relations with eastern Europep. 225
Development cooperationp. 228
List of Boxes, Tables, Figures and Mapsp. viii
List of Abbreviationsp. x
Introductionp. xii
Acknowledgementsp. xix
1 What is the European Union?p. 1
The international systemp. 2
Confederalismp. 6
Federalismp. 9
The logic of integrationp. 12
Functionalismp. 13
Neofunctionalismp. 16
Regional integration around the worldp. 18
The Americasp. 18
Asiap. 21
The Middle Eastp. 23
Africap. 24
Conclusionsp. 25
2 The Idea of Europep. 27
The changing identity of Europep. 28
Where is Europe?p. 36
Europe todayp. 39
Political structuresp. 39
Administrative structuresp. 45
Economic structuresp. 47
Conclusionsp. 50
3 The Evolution of the EUp. 52
Domestic and international backgroundp. 53
First steps towards integration (1945-58)p. 58
The European Economic Community (1958-86)p. 62
Economic and social integration (1979-92)p. 67
From Community to Union (1992-)p. 71
Conclusionsp. 77
4 The Institutions of the EUp. 79
A constitution for Europep. 80
The European Commissionp. 82
The Council of Ministersp. 89
The European Parliamentp. 94
The European Court of Justicep. 99
The European Councilp. 103
Conclusionsp. 106
5 The EU and the Member Statesp. 108
The changing identities of the member statesp. 109
Understanding the policy processp. 115
The politics of the budgetp. 121
The changing character of the EUp. 125
Conclusionsp. 129
6 The EU and its Citizensp. 131
The democratic deficitp. 132
The people's Europep. 139
Participation and representationp. 145
European electionsp. 146
Referendap. 148
Interest groupsp. 150
Improving accountabilityp. 153
Conclusionsp. 155
7 Economic Policyp. 157
The single marketp. 158
Physical barriersp. 159
Fiscal barriersp. 162
Technical barriersp. 163
Effects of the single marketp. 165
Rights of residencep. 165
Joint ventures and corporate mergersp. 165
A European transport systemp. 170
Open skies over Europep. 171
Inside the euro zonep. 173
Conclusionsp. 179
8 Improving the Quality of Lifep. 181
Building an even playing fieldp. 182
Agricultural policyp. 187
Regional policyp. 194
Social policyp. 197
Environmental policyp. 201
Conclusionsp. 206
9 The EU and the Worldp. 208
Building a European foreign policyp. 209
Towards a European defence policyp. 214
Europe as an economic powerp. 220
Relations with the United Statesp. 223
Relations with eastern Europep. 225
Development cooperationp. 228