Cover image for Touching base : professional baseball and American culture in the Progressive Era
Title:
Touching base : professional baseball and American culture in the Progressive Era
Author:
Riess, Steven A.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Revised edition.
Publication Information:
Urbana : University of Illinois Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
x, 308 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Take me out to the ball game : the crowd and the ideology of baseball -- Professional baseball and urban politics -- Politics, ballparks, and the neighborhoods -- Professional Sunday baseball and social reform -- Professional baseball as a source of social mobility.
ISBN:
9780252024672

9780252067754

9780761914105
Format :
Book

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GV867.64 .R54 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Baseball's emergence as the leading American sport during the Progressive Era gave rise to myths that have endured: baseball as an indigenous, rural, and democratic pastime that built character, acculturated newcomers, and promoted traditional values and a sense of community. Baseball ideology continues to portray the sport as an institution that helps bind the nation against the forces of modernization.


Summary

Discusses the ideology of baseball, professional baseball and urban politics, politics, ballparks, and the neighborhoods, social reform, and baseball as a source of social mobility.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

The first edition of this study of the role of baseball in American culture appeared in 1980 (CH, Mar'81). Riess (Northern Illinois Univ.) argued that professional baseball served as a vehicle of socialization in the first two decades of the 20th century, teaching a wide public of fans an ethic of middle-class virtue and respectability. Although the revised edition features some significant rewriting and incorporates the results of scholarly research published since 1980, the changes do not affect the core of the work. Riess has sharpened his prose and sometimes added nuances to his views, and the revised edition evinces greater recognition of the significance of the absence of African-American players from organized baseball. Consequently, the revised edition is somewhat longer than the first version and boasts a significantly richer array of useful source citations in its notes. These changes have made a good book better. Unfortunately, however, the revised edition has lost the valuable bibliography found in the first version. All libraries with collections of baseball history should own Riess's book. But if they already have the first edition, the gain to be derived from securing the new one is probably marginal. All readership levels. R. Browning; Kenyon College


Choice Review

The first edition of this study of the role of baseball in American culture appeared in 1980 (CH, Mar'81). Riess (Northern Illinois Univ.) argued that professional baseball served as a vehicle of socialization in the first two decades of the 20th century, teaching a wide public of fans an ethic of middle-class virtue and respectability. Although the revised edition features some significant rewriting and incorporates the results of scholarly research published since 1980, the changes do not affect the core of the work. Riess has sharpened his prose and sometimes added nuances to his views, and the revised edition evinces greater recognition of the significance of the absence of African-American players from organized baseball. Consequently, the revised edition is somewhat longer than the first version and boasts a significantly richer array of useful source citations in its notes. These changes have made a good book better. Unfortunately, however, the revised edition has lost the valuable bibliography found in the first version. All libraries with collections of baseball history should own Riess's book. But if they already have the first edition, the gain to be derived from securing the new one is probably marginal. All readership levels. R. Browning; Kenyon College