Cover image for Sex and cognition
Title:
Sex and cognition
Author:
Kimura, Doreen.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
x, 217 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm
General Note:
"A Bradford book."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780262112369
Format :
Book

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BF311 .K485 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Honorable Mention in the category of Psychology in the 1999 Professional/Scholarly Publishing Annual Awards Competition presented by the Association of American Publishers, Inc. In this fact-driven book, Doreen Kimura provides an intelligible overview of what is known about the neural and hormonal bases of sex differences in behavior, particularly differences in cognitive ability. Kimura argues that women and men differ not only in physical attributes and reproductive function, but also in how they solve common problems. She offers evidence that the effects of sex hormones on brain organization occur so early in life that, from the start, the environment is acting on differently wired brains in girls and boys. She presents various behavioral, neurological, and endocrinological studies that shed light on the processes giving rise to these sex differences in the brain.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Kimura (Simon Fraser Univ.) provides a much-needed review and synthesis of the research literature regarding sex differences in cognitive abilities. The book has received a great deal of well-deserved critical acclaim from the scientific and lay press due to its rare combination of readability and scientific rigor. Much of the work is from Kimura's own laboratory; widely regarded as the foremost expert in the field, the author has produced the bulk of the data on the topic. Here she addresses a key issue, one that often make the study of sex differences politically charged: equality between the sexes. The existence of sex differences on cognitive tasks neither implies superiority of one sex nor makes any prediction regarding the ability of any individual on such tasks--a point often missing in reviews on sex differences in behavior. Although the scientific pursuit of truth is inherently unbiased, the interpretation of research can be applied to further the arguments of those who discriminate. Scientists have a responsibility to guide the lay audience toward the appropriate interpretation of their research, and Kimura provides this guidance in the book's introduction. Highly recommended for all collections. W. F. Sternberg; Haverford College


Table of Contents

Preface
1 Introduction
Egalitarian Ideology
Nature/Nurture
Different Criteria for Research on Sex Differences?
Further Reading
2 Our Evolutionary Legacy
Summary
Further Reading
3 How Males and Females Become Different
Summary
Further Reading
4 Motor Skills
Summary
Further Reading
5 Spatial Abilities
The Role of Experience
Summary
Further Reading
6 Mathematical Aptitude
Summary
Further Reading
7 Perception
Vision
Social Perception
Summary
Further Readings
8 Verbal Abilities
Verbal Memory
Summary
Further Reading
9 Hormonal Mechanisms
Organization of Spatial Ability in Humans
Natural Hormonal Fluctuations
Summary
Notes
Further Reading
10 Brain Mechanisms Studied in Normal Brains
Brain Size
The Hypothalamus
The Hippocampal Complex
Interhemispheric Connections
Hemispheric Asymmetry
Note
Further Reading
11 Brain Mechanisms Studied in Damaged Brains
Verbal Fluency
Verbal Memory
Spatial Blocks
Line Orientation
Intrahemispheric Organization
Summary
Further Reading
12 Body Asymmetry and Cognitive Pattern
Summary
Note
Further Reading
13 Concluding Remarks
How Valid Are Tests?
Further Reading
Appendix Dealing with Numbers
Differences between Groups
Probability
Variation
Correlation
Factor Analysis
Summary
Further Reading
Glossary
Author Index
Subject Index