Cover image for Politics and society in Ukraine
Title:
Politics and society in Ukraine
Author:
D'Anieri, Paul J., 1965-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boulder, Colo. : Westview Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xv, 344 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
The demise of the Soviet Union and the emergence of the independent Ukraine -- Nation building and national identity -- Religion, state, and society -- Ukraine's weak state -- Politics and civil society -- Economic crisis and reform -- Foreign policy: from isolation to engagement -- Ukranian defense policy and the transformation of the armed forces -- Conclusion: problems and prospect for Ukraine in the twenty-first century.
Reading Level:
1520 Lexile.
ISBN:
9780813335377

9780813335384
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library JN6635 .D36 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

With the expansion of NATO, Ukraine is frequently described as the "linchpin" of security in Central Europe. And after Russia, it is the largest and most important of the post-Soviet states. Yet it is a country about which most westerners know very little, subsumed as it was for decades beneath the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union. Ukrainian Politics and Society is the first comprehensive study of politics in post-Soviet Ukraine, and is therefore vital reading for anyone concerned with European security, or with politics in the former Soviet Union.The authors' extensive experience in Ukraine allows them to explain the paradoxes of Ukrainian politics that have led to so many false predictions concerning the future of the Ukrainian state. Their examination of nationality politics shows why ethnic and regional differences have tended to recede rather than to spin out of control, as they have elsewhere in the region. At the same time, these differences hamstring the country's political system, and the authors show how difficult a task it is for democratic institutions to provide effective government in a country with little consensus. By viewing economic reform in its profoundly political context, the authors expose the chasm between the theory and practice of economic reform. Understanding of how to make profits has not been lacking, but government regulation to ensure that profit-seeking behavior leads to functioning markets has been conspicuously absent.By examining in detail how Ukrainian politics has followed theoretical expectations and where it has contradicted them, the authors arrive at conclusions with implications well beyond Ukraine. Ukraine must first build a state and a nation before it can successfully reform its economy or build a genuine democracy. For Ukraine and its people, the task is daunting. For the west, whose security increasingly relies on stability in Ukraine, this book provides the knowledge necessary to approach the problem, as well as good reason not to ignore it.


Summary

With the expansion of NATO, Ukraine is frequently described as the ?linchpin? of security in Central Europe. And after Russia, it is the largest and most important of the post-Soviet states. Yet it is a country about which most westerners know very little, subsumed as it was for decades beneath the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union. Ukrainian Politics and Society is the first comprehensive study of politics in post-Soviet Ukraine, and is therefore vital reading for anyone concerned with European security, or with politics in the former Soviet Union.The authors' extensive experience in Ukraine allows them to explain the paradoxes of Ukrainian politics that have led to so many false predictions concerning the future of the Ukrainian state. Their examination of nationality politics shows why ethnic and regional differences have tended to recede rather than to spin out of control, as they have elsewhere in the region. At the same time, these differences hamstring the country's political system, and the authors show how difficult a task it is for democratic institutions to provide effective government in a country with little consensus. By viewing economic reform in its profoundly political context, the authors expose the chasm between the theory and practice of economic reform. Understanding of how to make profits has not been lacking, but government regulation to ensure that profit-seeking behavior leads to functioning markets has been conspicuously absent.By examining in detail how Ukrainian politics has followed theoretical expectations and where it has contradicted them, the authors arrive at conclusions with implications well beyond Ukraine. Ukraine must first build a state and a nation before it can successfully reform its economy or build a genuine democracy. For Ukraine and its people, the task is daunting. For the west, whose security increasingly relies on stability in Ukraine, this book provides the knowledge necessary to approach the problem, as well as good reason not to ignore it.


Author Notes

Taras Kuzio is an honorary research fellow in the Ukraine Centre at the University of North London. He has previously served as a senior research fellow at the University of Birmingham and on the Council of Advisors for the Ukrainian Parliament.


Taras Kuzio is an honorary research fellow in the Ukraine Centre at the University of North London. He has previously served as a senior research fellow at the University of Birmingham and on the Council of Advisors for the Ukrainian Parliament.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

D'Anieri, Kravchuk, and Kuzio provide a comprehensive introduction to Ukraine since the country gained independence in 1991. The three authors are, respectively, specialists in politics, economics, and foreign/military policy, so all major directions of the new state are treated in a single volume (there is even a chapter on religion). The authors portray the processes of nation and state-building as basically on track, and they do not ponder the possibility that Ukraine could have followed a radically different course. Some important and controversial features of Ukrainian political life are downplayed. These neglected topics include organized crime and corruption, regional politics in the ethnically Russian provinces of Crimea and East Ukraine, and the struggle of people (and firms) to survive in a desperately poor economy. Focusing discussion on such issues would have made the book more attractive as an introductory volume. Students may do better with Taras Kuzio and Andrew Wilson, Ukraine: Perestroika to Independence ( CH, Jul'94). P. Rutland; Wesleyan University


Choice Review

D'Anieri, Kravchuk, and Kuzio provide a comprehensive introduction to Ukraine since the country gained independence in 1991. The three authors are, respectively, specialists in politics, economics, and foreign/military policy, so all major directions of the new state are treated in a single volume (there is even a chapter on religion). The authors portray the processes of nation and state-building as basically on track, and they do not ponder the possibility that Ukraine could have followed a radically different course. Some important and controversial features of Ukrainian political life are downplayed. These neglected topics include organized crime and corruption, regional politics in the ethnically Russian provinces of Crimea and East Ukraine, and the struggle of people (and firms) to survive in a desperately poor economy. Focusing discussion on such issues would have made the book more attractive as an introductory volume. Students may do better with Taras Kuzio and Andrew Wilson, Ukraine: Perestroika to Independence ( CH, Jul'94). P. Rutland; Wesleyan University


Table of Contents

List of Tables and Illustrationsp. vii
List of Acronymsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction: The "Quadruple Transition" in Ukrainian Politics and Societyp. 1
1 The Demise of the Soviet Union and the Emergence of Independent Ukrainep. 10
2 Nation Building and National Identityp. 45
3 Religion, State, and Societyp. 71
4 Ukraine's Weak Statep. 90
5 Politics and Civil Societyp. 141
6 Economic Crisis and Reformp. 166
7 Foreign Policy: From Isolation to Engagementp. 206
8 Ukrainian Defense Policy and the Transformation of the Armed Forcesp. 233
9 Conclusion: Problems and Prospects for Ukraine in the Twenty-First Centuryp. 262
Notesp. 273
Bibliographyp. 321
Indexp. 333
List of Tables and Illustrationsp. vii
List of Acronymsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
Introduction: The "Quadruple Transition" in Ukrainian Politics and Societyp. 1
1 The Demise of the Soviet Union and the Emergence of Independent Ukrainep. 10
2 Nation Building and National Identityp. 45
3 Religion, State, and Societyp. 71
4 Ukraine's Weak Statep. 90
5 Politics and Civil Societyp. 141
6 Economic Crisis and Reformp. 166
7 Foreign Policy: From Isolation to Engagementp. 206
8 Ukrainian Defense Policy and the Transformation of the Armed Forcesp. 233
9 Conclusion: Problems and Prospects for Ukraine in the Twenty-First Centuryp. 262
Notesp. 273
Bibliographyp. 321
Indexp. 333

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