Cover image for Daddy is a doodlebug
Title:
Daddy is a doodlebug
Author:
Degen, Bruce.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : HarperCollinsPublishers, 2000.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 26 cm
Summary:
A young doodlebug describes how he and his father are alike and the things they enjoy doing together.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.5 0.5 39866.
ISBN:
9780060284152

9780060284169
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC. BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-Picture Books
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PIC. BK. 4 Juvenile Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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Summary

Summary

As Daddy and his doodlebug snack on potoodle chips, padoodle their canoe, and count firefloodles, they savor the special joys of companionship by spending time doing the things they love, together.

Bruce Degen's inventive rhyme and lush paintings animate a miniature world full of bugs galore, in which buttons serve as the wheels of a teacup buggy and pencils hold up the swing set! This fanciful storyoodle begs to be read aloud over and over again.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-6. In this sweet, rhyming story, a little bug and its daddy spend the day together doing things they like to do. Because they draw, they are "doodlebugs"; they are also "apple strudel bugs" and "foodlebugs." There's an appealing mix of real words and activities and humorous nonsense--" potoodle chips." The illustrations are bright and crisp like the text, and they are both realistic and whimsical. The father pushes the young bug on a swing set made from bright yellow pencils, and the two ride the "caboodle car" past houses that look like teakettles. There's plenty also to amuse older (adult) readers, too--little bug's room is decorated with a poster for The Beetles, complete with four beetles with mop-top haircuts. It's nice to find a book that presents a child spending the day with Dad, and the gender neutrality of both the child and the activities makes this good for showing how varied gender roles can be. --Marta Segal


Publisher's Weekly Review

Father and son bugs have a jolly time in this jaunty tale, in which Degen (Jamberry) again reveals his knack for creating and combining words in playful verse. "We doodle things together" explains the young narrator, first seen drawing pictures with his father. The cheerful son repeatedly draws a parallel between himself and his dad as he describes the adventures they share: "We walk our poodlebug down the lane,/ We ride the caboodle car on the train,/ We padoodle the canoe in the sun and rain./ That's what doodlebugs do./ 'Cause Daddy is a canoedlebug, and I'm a canoedlebug too." Degen works in a style reminiscent of vintage animated cartoons, achieved by creating the artwork in two stages: he executes a black pen-and-ink overlay and gouache color artwork on separate sheets. The star characters, as well as the other four-armed, anthropomorphic bug residents of Doodletown, are all the funnier for their useful extra limbs: a waitress in Mayfly's Diner, for instance, balances an entire meal on her quartet of appendages, and a fellow serenades his date on the banjo while holding a parasol for her in a canoe. Degen's noodle has come up with some fittingly quirky visuals for this splendoodle rhymoodle. Ages 3-6. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

PreS-K-A charming picture book full of clever wordplay and distinctive illustrations. Written as if a young boy-er, bug-were describing favorite activities shared with his dad, Degen's rhyming text incorporates freshly coined words such as "potoodle chips," "firefloodles" and "fairytoodles." Like kids everywhere, the narrator enjoys visiting the zoo, sharing a meal, playing in the park, and listening to bedtime stories. The language is occasionally visually challenging ("canoedlebug," for example) but flows well with a little bit of practice. The attractive typeface, crisp and dark, complements the brightly colored gouache illustrations outlined in black ink. Visual humor abounds, often linked to verbal puns. The zoo, for example, features a caged dog tick, an ant lion, and a rhinoceros beetle. Various bugs perch on toadstools at the counter of "Mayfly's Diner" where a friendly looking green bug serves the narrator and his dad (noodle soup and apple strudel, of course). The layout features mostly double-page spreads depicting father-son outings. They contrast nicely with the cozy interiors and the little bug's imagined versions of storytime scenes, both shown in smaller single-page pictures. From the stylized buggy endpapers to the bouncy rhythm and delightful details, this is a carefully created ode to the loving connection between parent and child.-Lisa Dennis, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, PA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.