Cover image for One lonely seahorse
Title:
One lonely seahorse
Author:
Freymann, Saxton.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Arthur A. Levine Books, 2000.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 23 x 26 cm
Summary:
One lonely sea horse learns that she has a lot of friends--friends she can really "count" on.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 140 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 1.8 0.5 49756.

Reading Counts RC K-2 1.9 1 Quiz: 21406 Guided reading level: K.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780439110143
Format :
Book

Available:*

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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC.BK. Juvenile Fiction Childrens Area-A-B-C 1-2-3 Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction Picture Books
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PIC BK. Juvenile Fiction A-B-C- 1-2-3 Books
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On Order

Summary

Summary

One lonely sea horse learns that she has a lot of friends--friends she can really "count" on to help. Full-color illustrations.


Author Notes

Joost Elffers is the producer of Viking Studio's bestselling The Secret Language of Birthdays, The Secret Language of Relationships, and Play with Your Food.

He lives in New York City.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

Ages 3^-7. The expert food sculpting team behind How Are You Peeling? [BKL F 1 00] is back with another produce-inspired offering. In beautifully photographed dioramas, fruits and vegetables are transformed into sea flora and fauna in an underwater counting adventure that begins with Bea, a little sea horse made from beets. Simple, rhyming couplets describe her successful search for friends, who appear in gradually increasing groups of doctored food, ending with a school of 10 bell pepper angelfish. As in the authors' previous book, the edible characters are wonderfully expressive, with a wide range of emotions captured through the use of a few simple slits and seeds. Well-known foods such as bananas and pineapples "swim" along with the more exotic ones--among them, horned melons. Children will have fun using the endpaper produce key to sort everything out and gleefully accept the invitation to review counting basics and find the creative possibilities in familiar objects. --Gillian Engberg


School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-Although there is nothing innovative about the story, this counting book from the creators of How Are You Peeling? (Scholastic, 1999) is worth a second look. As a solitary sea horse ("Her name was Bea, and Bea was blue/And as she cried her sadness grew") moves through the ocean, she meets two small crabs, three puffer fish, and so on, until she finds herself surrounded by a variety of new underwater friends. The rhyming text is mediocre; however, the illustrations, created out of fruits and vegetables, are amazing. Red and yellow peppers, placed at just the right angle and embellished with eyes, magically become a school of angelfish. Lobsters made from ginger rest on mushrooms that look like the ocean floor, while turtles with pineapple shells swim nearby. Bananas with their tops cut open to resemble snouts make a convincing group of dolphins that dive around a coral constructed out of unshelled fava beans. Each turn of the page reveals a cleverly conceived and executed scene that evokes a remarkably realistic underwater moment. All of the edibles are identified on the back endpapers. Aside from being fun to look at, this imaginative book would make a great jumping-off point for art projects or even a unit on food.-Joy Fleishhacker, formerly at School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.