Cover image for Great expectations
Title:
Great expectations
Author:
Dickens, Charles, 1812-1870.
Publication Information:
Germany? : NAXOS AudioBooks, [1996]

â„—1996
Physical Description:
4 audio discs (315 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Summary:
After harsh early years, Pip, an orphan growing up in Victorian England, is given the means to become a gentleman by an unknown benefactor and learns that outward appearances can be deceiving.
General Note:
Compact discs (DDD).

Abridged by Perry Keenlyside.

Program notes by Perry Keenlyside laid in container.

"Classic fiction."

"Classic literature with classical music."
Language:
English
Contents:
CD 1: An encounter in the churchyard (7:39) -- Pip's theft (6:42) -- The convict (6:09) -- Mrs. Joe gives a supper party (5:56) -- The runaways apprehended (8:52) -- Pip is apprenticed to Joe (10:44) -- A visit to Miss Havisham (15:35) -- 'A bright new shilling' (7:04) -- The pale young gentleman (10:04) -- CD 2: The pale young gentleman (cont.) (4:18) -- Twenty-five guineas (8:38) -- A half-holiday and a brutal attack (12:34) -- Mrs. Joe's communication (5:41) -- Pip confides in Biddy (9:17) --'A young fellow of great expectations' (11:18) -- Preparation and parting (6:55) -- Mr. Jaggers' instructions (4:01) -- Re-appearance of a former adversary (3:20) -- Miss Havisham's story (11:34) -- CD 3: Pip settles in (5:12) -- Mr. Wemmick at home (8:07) -- Dinner with Mr. Jaggers (4:10) -- Joe brings a message (7:13) -- 'Love her, love her, love her' (7:54) -- Pip and Herbert exchange confidences (3:52) -- A kiss and a warning (4:15) -- Debts, death and a funeral (7:23) -- Pip comes of age (4:15) --Mr. Wemmick's Walworth sentiments (4:53) -- Pip discovers his benefactor (12:03) -- Introducing Mr. Provis (10:10) -- CD 4: Magwitch's story (7:19) -- Bentley Drummle (2:30) -- Estella's unwelcome news (4:51) -- 'Don't go home!' (5:03) -- Herbert's plan (2:05) -- Mr. Wopsle's curious observation and Mr. Jagger's housekeeper (6:42) -- Remorse and an accident at Miss Havisham's (8:25) -- Estella's parentage discovered (3:01) -- Pip accepts a dangerous invitation (4:51) -- An old enemy attacks again (2:26) --'Hunted, wounded and shackled' (8:59) -- 'Hollo! Here's a wedding!' (1:41) -- Magwitch cheats the hangman (3:34) -- Illness and a faithful friend (3:42) -- Pip's debts paid (2:27) -- Joe and Biddy's surprise (2:45) -- Pip gains a position and Herbert learns a secret (1:15) -- Pip and Estella (6:43).
ISBN:
9789626340820
UPC:
3009900822
Format :
Audiobook on CD

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Summary

Summary

The profound and personal tale of Pip. Music: Mendelssohn & Grieg.


Author Notes

Charles Dickens, perhaps the best British novelist of the Victorian era, was born in Portsmouth, Hampshire, England on February 7, 1812. His happy early childhood was interrupted when his father was sent to debtors' prison, and young Dickens had to go to work in a factory at age twelve. Later, he took jobs as an office boy and journalist before publishing essays and stories in the 1830s.

His first novel, The Pickwick Papers, made him a famous and popular author at the age of twenty-five. Subsequent works were published serially in periodicals and cemented his reputation as a master of colorful characterization, and as a harsh critic of social evils and corrupt institutions. His many books include Oliver Twist, David Copperfield, Bleak House, Great Expectations, Little Dorrit, A Christmas Carol, and A Tale of Two Cities.

Dickens married Catherine Hogarth in 1836, and the couple had nine children before separating in 1858 when he began a long affair with Ellen Ternan, a young actress. Despite the scandal, Dickens remained a public figure, appearing often to read his fiction. He died in 1870, leaving his final novel, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, unfinished.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Many baby boomers got their first taste of great literature from a Classics Illustrated comic. This volume in the relaunched line introduces readers to Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, the story of a young man's search for acceptance after receiving riches from a mysterious benefactor. With a book as long as Dickens' classic, it's natural that the comic is text heavy, but even so, it's astonishing how well adaptor and illustrator Geary hits the high points of the serpentine story. The art captures the drama (and don't miss the beautiful endpapers), though for those who know the story, Miss Havisham is drawn more coarsely than one might wish. Use this as a gateway to the classic; it may also be the only chance some kids get to meet Dickens' fascinating characters. Either way, readers will come away understanding why the story has endured. An updated profile of Geary, and a note from the editor of the original series complete the new harcover package.--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2008 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

Returning to print after more than a decade, this first volume in the relaunch of the Classics Illustrated series presents a handsomely rendered adaptation of the orphaned Pip's first-person narrative of his journey from humble childhood to adulthood as an English gentleman. Though quite involving, this retelling of the Dickens classic registers as a "fast forward" version of the epic tale of one man's evolution and the hard lessons learned from it, but that aspect is a minor quibble shoved aside by Geary's charmingly cartoony art. Long hailed for his unique work in such diverse showcases as the New York Times, National Lampoon and his exceptional continuing series A Treasury of Victorian Murder, Geary's fleshy characterizations breathe a near-animated life into the classic tale. This pleasant graphic interpretation can serve as an introduction to Dickens for younger readers and perhaps eventually steer them to the wider world of the source material and beyond. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

With a major new film adaptation of Great Expectations coming soon to the big screen, now is a good moment for an updated audio edition of this classic story of an orphan boy's rise from poverty to gentility, thanks to the help of an unknown patron. One of Dickens's finest works, it is, all at once, the heartrending tale of unrequited love, a deep mystery with a shocking resolution, and an often exciting action story. VERDICT Simon Prebble's powerful narration brings Dickens's colorful dialog alive and will make the book's 18-plus hours seem so many minutes. During this bicentennial year of Dickens's birth, this audiobook should be a slam-dunk acquisition for most libraries. [See "Charles Dickens: Our Mutual Friend," LJ 2/15/12, for more Dickens titles in audio.]-R. Kent Rasmussen, Thousand Oaks, CA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 7 Up-This classic tale is condensed into a fast-paced format that, in the Original Text, still contains much of Dickens's original phrasing. The language remains the real charm of the story-Pip is not a terribly likable character, as he is far too concerned with station and class and is too easily ashamed of his past-and the adaptation works wonderfully as an abridgment accompanied by expressive artwork that accurately depicts the era. Notes at the end offer more information about Dickens's time and the political climate that form the context for the novel. Quick Text is a plain-language translation that reads well and is likely to attract a more reluctant audience. While the adaptation of the story is still good, it is a shame to lose the author's original words; the art makes the action and situations clear enough without further watering down the text. Unfortunately, the Quick Text cover is much more intriguing than the Original Text. The latter is recommended for libraries looking to expand their graphic-novel selections into the classics, with the former recommended only where reluctant readers are the majority of the comics audience.-Alana Abbott, James Blackstone Memorial Library, Branford, CT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter I. My father's family name being Pirrip, and my christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip. I give Pirrip as my father's family name, on the authority of his tombstone and my sister - Mrs. Joe Gargery, who married the blacksmith. As I never saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them (for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies regarding what they were like, were unreasonably derived from their tombstones. The shape of the letters on my father's, gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair. From the character and turn of the inscription, "Also Georgiana Wife of the Above," I drew a childish conclusion that my mother was freckled and sickly. To five little stone lozenges, each about a foot and a half long, which were arranged in a neat row beside their grave, and were sacred to the memory of five little brothers of mine - who gave up trying to get a living exceedingly early in that universal struggle - I am indebted for a belief I religiously entertained that they had all been born on their backs with their hands in their trousers-pockets, and had never taken them out in this state of existence. Ours was the marsh country, down by the river, within as the river wound, twenty miles of the sea. My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things, seems to me to have been gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening. At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard; and that Philip Pirrip, late of this parish, and also Georgiana wife of the above, were dead and buried; and that Alexander, Bartholomew, Abraham, Tobias, and Roger, infant children of the aforesaid, were also dead and buried; and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard, intersected with dykes and mounds and gates, with scattered cattle feeding on it, was the marshes; and that the low leaden line beyond was the river; and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was the sea; and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all and beginning to cry, was Pip. "Hold your noise!" cried a terrible voice, as a man started up from among the graves at the side of the church porch. "Keep still, you little devil, or I'll cut your throat!" A fearful man, all in coarse grey, with a great iron on his leg. A man with no hat, and with broken shoes, and with an old rag tied round his head. A man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in mud, and lamed by stones, and cut by flints, and stung by nettles, and torn by briars; who limped, and shivered, and glared and growled; and whose teeth chattered in his head as he seized me by the chin. "Oh! Don't cut my throat, sir," I pleaded in terror. "Pray don't do it, sir." "Tell us your name!" said the man. "Quick!" "Pip, sir." "Once more," said the man, staring at me. "Give it mouth!" Excerpted from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.