Cover image for The making of the pacemaker : celebrating a lifesaving invention
Title:
The making of the pacemaker : celebrating a lifesaving invention
Author:
Greatbatch, Wilson.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2000.
Physical Description:
260 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781573928069
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library RC684.P3 G69 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room-Buffalo Collection Non-Circ
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Central Library RC684.P3 G69 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library RC684.P3 G69 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Central Library RC684.P3 G69 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks-Non circulating
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Clarence Library RC684.P3 G69 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Local History
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Clarence Library RC684.P3 G69 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library RC684.P3 G69 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Local History
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Summary

Summary

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Author Notes

Authors Bio, not available


Reviews 1

Choice Review

The jacket blurb on this work concludes that The Making of the Pacemaker is a human-interest story at its best and an important firsthand account of an invention that today saves millions of lives." This statement partially proves the axiom, "don't judge a book by its cover." Although the volume is a highly technical firsthand account of the invention and development of the pacemaker, it is certainly not a "human-interest story." Greatbatch, the device's inventor, is an electrical engineer of considerable accomplishment who writes as if he were presenting a scientific paper. Personal commentary is of "the name, rank, and serial number" variety. That said, the book is concise, readable, and extremely well researched. There are numerous illustrations that help the reader visualize the materials and techniques that are being described in the most minute detail. The audience for the book is highly specialized; medical historians, especially those interested in cardiology or medical technology would find it valuable as would interested clinicians. Researchers; faculty; professionals. I. Richman Pennsylvania State University, Harrisburg


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