Cover image for Steven Spielberg : interviews
Title:
Steven Spielberg : interviews
Author:
Spielberg, Steven, 1946-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xxxii, 250 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
General Note:
A collection of interviews by various interviewers, 1974-1999.

Includes index.
Language:
English
Contents:
At sea with Steven Spielberg / Filming The Sugarland Express: an iterview with Steven Spielberg / Primal scream: an interview with Steven Spielberg / Close encounter with Steven Spielberg / Mind behind Close Encounters of the Third Kind / 1941: bombs away! / Steven Spielberg in his adventures on earth / Conversation with Steven Spielberg / Spielberg films The Color Purple

Spielberg at 40: the man and the child / Always: an interview with Steven Spielberg / Hook / Steven's choice / Seriously Spielberg / "World apart" / Five-star general / Crossroads: Steven Spielberg / Steven the good
ISBN:
9781578061129

9781578061136
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PN1998.3.S65 A5 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Spanning 25 years of Spielberg's career, this book explores the issues, themes, and financial considerations surrounding his works. The blockbuster creator of "E.T., Jaws, " and "Schindler's List" talks about dreams and the almighty dollar. Includes 10 film stills, chronology, filmography, and index.


Summary

Steven Spielberg has become a brand name and a force that extends far beyond the movie screen. Phrases like "phone home" and the music score from Jaws are now part of our cultural script, appearing in commercials, comedy routines, and common conversation.

Yet few scholars have devoted time to studying Spielberg's vast output of popular films despite the director's financial and aesthetic achievements. Spanning twenty-five years of Spielberg's career, Steven Spielberg: Interviews explores the issues, the themes, and the financial considerations surrounding his work. The blockbuster creator of E.T. , Jaws , and Schindler's List talks about dreams and the almighty dollar.

"I'm not really interested in making money," he says. "That's always come as the result of success, but it's not been my goal, and I've had a tough time proving that to people."

Ranging from Spielberg's twenties to his mid-fifties, the interviews chart his evolution from a brash young filmmaker trying to make his way in Hollywood, to his spectacular blockbuster triumphs, to his maturation as a director seeking to inspire the imagination with meaningful subjects.

The Steven Spielberg who emerges in these talks is a complex mix of businessman and artist, of arrogance and insecurity, of shallowness and substance. Often interviewers will uncover the director's human side, noting how changes in Spielberg's personal life -- marriage, divorce, fatherhood, remarriage -- affect his movies. But always the interviewers find keys to the story-telling and filmmaking talent that have made Spielberg's characters and themes shape our times and inhabit our dreams.

"Every time I go to a movie, it's magic, no matter what the movie's about," he says. "Whether you watch eight hours of Shoah or whether it's Ghostbusters , when the lights go down in the theater and the movie fades in, it's magic."


Author Notes

Lester D. Friedman teaches medical humanities and bioethics at Upstate Medical University and cinema studies in the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Syracuse University.|Brent Notbohm of Spring Green, Wisconsin, is a freelance instructor of film production and media studies. He has written and directed several films and videos independently and as a graduate student at Syracuse University's College of Visual and Performing Arts.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

One of the most fascinating aspects of the Conversations with Filmmakers series is the way its simple chronological structure allows the reader to observe how a director's view of his or her life and work changes over the years. This is especially true here, as we watch Steven Spielberg go from the twentysomething, still slightly awestruck wunderkind, answering questions about his first feature film, Sugarland Express, to the most successful filmmaker in history discussing the burden of his fame on his professional and personal lives. In between, the various interviews, many from film quarterlies, track Spielberg's career in the kind of detail not available in the popular press. In addition to the technical information (there's lots of insider talk about lenses and camera angles), fans will appreciate the wealth of personal asides: that Spielberg, as a teenager, was thrown off the set of two Hitchcock movies; that he once planned to make a musical with Quincy Jones. In all, this is another fine installment in an outstanding series. --Ilene Cooper


Booklist Review

One of the most fascinating aspects of the Conversations with Filmmakers series is the way its simple chronological structure allows the reader to observe how a director's view of his or her life and work changes over the years. This is especially true here, as we watch Steven Spielberg go from the twentysomething, still slightly awestruck wunderkind, answering questions about his first feature film, Sugarland Express, to the most successful filmmaker in history discussing the burden of his fame on his professional and personal lives. In between, the various interviews, many from film quarterlies, track Spielberg's career in the kind of detail not available in the popular press. In addition to the technical information (there's lots of insider talk about lenses and camera angles), fans will appreciate the wealth of personal asides: that Spielberg, as a teenager, was thrown off the set of two Hitchcock movies; that he once planned to make a musical with Quincy Jones. In all, this is another fine installment in an outstanding series. --Ilene Cooper


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