Cover image for I don't want to talk about it
Title:
I don't want to talk about it
Author:
Ransom, Jeanie Franz, 1957-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Washington, D.C. : Magination Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
28 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Summary:
After reluctantly talking with her parents about their upcoming divorce, a young girl discovers that there will be some big changes but that their love for her will remain the same. Includes an afterword for parents on helping children through such a change.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781557986641

9781557987037
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Concord Library HQ777.5 .R36 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library HQ777.5 .R36 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

When a child's parents tell her that they have decided to divorce, the last thing she wants to do is to talk about it. Instead, she wants to roar like a lion so she can't hear their words. This story reveals a range of feelings a young child might experience when a family is confronting divorce.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-A competent piece of bibliotherapy aimed at helping children of divorce deal with their new, difficult, and conflicting emotions. Told by a young girl whose parents have just told her they are getting a divorce, the narrative then goes through the range of the child's possible emotions, as the adults suggest how she might be feeling. She, in turn, imagines herself to be an animal that would adequately express her emotions. When her father tells her that it's OK to be scared, her response is, "I wanted to be a lion with a roar so loud that everyone would think I was very brave." Assurances of her parents' continued love and that certain family rituals will remain the same make her feel better. Full-page illustrations capably portray the images in the text, especially the metaphors of the animals that the girl uses to express her feelings. The book concludes with a two-page note to parents suggesting ways to deal with their children's reactions. A worthy and appropriate addition to most parenting collections.-Jane Marino, Scarsdale Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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