Cover image for Nothing to fear
Title:
Nothing to fear
Author:
Koller, Jackie French.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
viii, 279 pages ; 22 cm
Summary:
When his father moves away to find work and his mother becomes ill, Danny struggles to help his family during the Great Depression.
General Note:
"Gulliver books."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
730 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 4.2 8.0 5975.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 6.3 14 Quiz: 08498 Guided reading level: NR.
ISBN:
9780152005443

9780152575823
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

When his father moves away to find work and his mother becomes ill, Danny struggles to help his family during the Great Depression.


Summary

Thirteen-year-old Danny and his family are struggling to make ends meet in New York during the Great Depression. His father leaves to search for work, and Danny and his mother do what they can to survive. With his mother pregnant and unable to help, Danny is forced to beg for food. Through it all, they retain their good humor and family pride, and in the end help arrives in a most unexpected guise. "Rich, rewarding historical fiction."-- Kirkus Reviews


Author Notes

Jackie French Koller is a prolific children's author.

Jackie's first book, Impy for Always, was published in 1989. She's gone on to write over 30 other books including The Keepers and Dragonling Series.

Koller's books have received numerous awards and accolades - among them ALA Notable Book and IRA Teachers' Choice.

Jackie lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and when she's not writing she enjoys painting, reading, hiking, making gingerbread houses, and playing with her grandchildren.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Jackie French Koller is a prolific children's author.

Jackie's first book, Impy for Always, was published in 1989. She's gone on to write over 30 other books including The Keepers and Dragonling Series.

Koller's books have received numerous awards and accolades - among them ALA Notable Book and IRA Teachers' Choice.

Jackie lives in Western Massachusetts with her husband and when she's not writing she enjoys painting, reading, hiking, making gingerbread houses, and playing with her grandchildren.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. With the same soft glow that popular TV casts over the Depression, this long, warm family story told by plucky young Danny Garvey focuses on his growing up first-generation Irish Catholic American in a New York City tenement. It's the winter of 1933. Pa's unemployed, and he leaves his family to try to find a job on the road. Ma takes in washing, but when she falls ill and very nearly dies in childbirth, the burden falls on young Danny. There are lots of chuckles as well as lumps in the throat and mists in the eye and crotchety characters with hearts of gold. Readers will enjoy the combination of comedy, mischief, and melodrama, as the story switches from neighborly Sunday afternoons and Danny's awkward first date to his tearful parting with Pa in the rain. There is also a strong sense of the desperate times, usually distanced through the stories of friends and neighbors--evictions, Hoovervilles, the Dust Bowl, etc.--though Danny himself experiences the shame of begging. One bleak episode breaks the formula: Pa doesn't get home for Christmas, or for New Year's either, and Danny realizes that his own dream of going to find Pa is a quest for escape, not manhood. Danny stays home and things slowly get better. Pair this with a girl's similiar experience of the Depression in Whitmore's The Bread Winner [BKL N 1 90]. ~--Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-9-- New York City youngster Daniel Garvey is around 11 when the Depression begins. At first he doesn't notice it much, but as the years go by, he sees the toll first in his neighborhood, as friends' families are evicted, and then in his own family. His father, out of work, takes to the road to find employment, and Daniel is left in charge of his expecting, ailing mother and his baby sister. Things go from bad to worse, until the family is rescued by someone who, at first blush, appears to be worse off than they. This differs from Pieter Van Raven's A Time of Troubles (Scribners, 1990) in that it deals with an eastern metropolitan population, not migrant workers. Less derivative than Van Raven's book, it also presents a view of the Depression that, if no less desperate, is less bleak. Daniel is an engaging protagonist who goesthrough numerous rites of passage familiar to young teens--first girlfriend, shaving, and the sudden realization that he is taller than his mother. He must also come to terms with his father's death and mother's remarriage. If it all works out a trifle too smoothly, the story still imparts the flavor of the time, and the strong plot line and numerous interesting supporting characters will hold readers' attention. --Ann Welton, Univ . Child Development School, Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. With the same soft glow that popular TV casts over the Depression, this long, warm family story told by plucky young Danny Garvey focuses on his growing up first-generation Irish Catholic American in a New York City tenement. It's the winter of 1933. Pa's unemployed, and he leaves his family to try to find a job on the road. Ma takes in washing, but when she falls ill and very nearly dies in childbirth, the burden falls on young Danny. There are lots of chuckles as well as lumps in the throat and mists in the eye and crotchety characters with hearts of gold. Readers will enjoy the combination of comedy, mischief, and melodrama, as the story switches from neighborly Sunday afternoons and Danny's awkward first date to his tearful parting with Pa in the rain. There is also a strong sense of the desperate times, usually distanced through the stories of friends and neighbors--evictions, Hoovervilles, the Dust Bowl, etc.--though Danny himself experiences the shame of begging. One bleak episode breaks the formula: Pa doesn't get home for Christmas, or for New Year's either, and Danny realizes that his own dream of going to find Pa is a quest for escape, not manhood. Danny stays home and things slowly get better. Pair this with a girl's similiar experience of the Depression in Whitmore's The Bread Winner [BKL N 1 90]. ~--Hazel Rochman


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-9-- New York City youngster Daniel Garvey is around 11 when the Depression begins. At first he doesn't notice it much, but as the years go by, he sees the toll first in his neighborhood, as friends' families are evicted, and then in his own family. His father, out of work, takes to the road to find employment, and Daniel is left in charge of his expecting, ailing mother and his baby sister. Things go from bad to worse, until the family is rescued by someone who, at first blush, appears to be worse off than they. This differs from Pieter Van Raven's A Time of Troubles (Scribners, 1990) in that it deals with an eastern metropolitan population, not migrant workers. Less derivative than Van Raven's book, it also presents a view of the Depression that, if no less desperate, is less bleak. Daniel is an engaging protagonist who goesthrough numerous rites of passage familiar to young teens--first girlfriend, shaving, and the sudden realization that he is taller than his mother. He must also come to terms with his father's death and mother's remarriage. If it all works out a trifle too smoothly, the story still imparts the flavor of the time, and the strong plot line and numerous interesting supporting characters will hold readers' attention. --Ann Welton, Univ . Child Development School, Seattle (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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