Cover image for Devil's claw
Title:
Devil's claw
Author:
Jance, Judith A.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : W. Morrow and Co., [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
374 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780380975013
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Alden Ewell Free Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Angola Public Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Elma Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Grand Island Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Orchard Park Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Audubon Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Audubon Library X Adult Fiction Mystery/Suspense
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Summary

Summary

In the night-still canyons of the Arizona desert, a girl is on the run. Alone but for her beloved red-tailed hawk, she flees from the dark shadows of her young life, the horror she has witnessed...and the terror that now stalks her.

New York Times bestselling author J.A. Jance returns with her eighth novel in the highly acclaimed Joanna Brady mystery series. Set against the backdrop of the modern west, this gripping tale finds Sheriff Brady juggling a precarious overload in both her personal and professional lives. About to be married, Joanna's facing a daughter turning twelve and going on twenty, a meddlesome mother micro-managing her wedding, and new in-laws arriving any day. The sudden death of her much-loved neighbor and handyman, Clayton Rhodes, creates further turmoil, leaving Joanna shocked, saddened, and the target of Clayton's irate and irrational daughter, who accuses the Sheriff's Department of covering up a possible murder.

But amidst the uproar, the report of a homicide at Cochise Stronghold in the Dragoon Mountains quickly captures Joanna's full attention. An Indian woman has been found shot to death--a woman recently released from prision after serving time for the manslaughter killing of her husband. She is the mother of a missing fifteen-year-old, Lucy Ridder.

The death at first appears to be a case of domestic rage finally exploding'and a troubled teen runaway may be a victim, or a cold-blooded killer. Yet as Joanna deals with the long-standing troubles of Clayton Rhodes' family and digs deeper into the mysterious life of Lucy and her family, she discovers that investigating family hostilities is leading her down a twisted trail of hatred, greed, and far-reaching consequences--and into a dangerous world where violence is the first response and long buried secrets are a reason to kill...or die.

Once again, J.A. Jance delivers a gritty, deftly written thriller that unfolds on a vivid landscape of raw beauty and unrelenting danger. And, as always, Sheriff Joanna Brady brings the setting to life with the sensitivity, spirit, and intense passion for justice that makes Jance novels ring with authenticity.


Author Notes

Judith Ann (J. A.) Jance was born in Watertown, South Dakota on October 27, 1944. She received a degree in English and secondary education in 1966 and a M. Ed. in library science in 1970 from the University of Arizona. Before becoming an author, she taught high school English, worked as a school librarian on a Native American reservation, and sold insurance.

She is the author of many popular mystery series including the J. P. Beaumont Mystery series, Joanna Brady Mystery series, and the Ali Reynolds series. She won the American Mystery Award for Without Due Process in 1992 and for Failure to Appear in 1993. Both of these titles are books in the J. P. Beaumont Mystery series. In 2014, her fiction book, A Last Goodbye, made the New York Times bestseller list.

Random Acts, a title in A Joanna Brady and Ali Reynolds Novella Series, made the New York Times bestseller list in 2016.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 4

Booklist Review

In a remarkable series of nine novels, Jance has created a fully realized universe in Cochise County, Arizona. This time County Sheriff Joanna Brady is working two cases in the weeks before her wedding to Butch Dixon. The first involves the death of her octogenarian handyman, friend, and neighbor, Clayton Rhodes. Clayton's daughter, Reba, returns from California to spew venom and collect her inheritance. When Reba learns Clayton bequeathed his ranch to Joanna, she accuses the sheriff of killing her father. The other case involves the murder of a woman freshly released from prison after serving eight years for murdering her husband. Lucy, the woman's 15-year-old daughter and prime suspect in the new murder, has vanished. The theme of adults understanding their parents permeates this novel, as Joanna tries to come to terms with her new in-laws, Reba violently struggles to reconcile her feelings toward her long-estranged father, and Lucy reassesses her mother's actions and motives. A quality entry in a quality series. (Reviewed May 1, 2000)0380975017George Needham


Publisher's Weekly Review

Southwestern mysteries continue to grow in popularity, with Jance's series, set in southern Arizona, one of the strongest entries in the subgenre. The new novel to feature Sheriff Joanna Brady opens at the entrance to a desert canyon called the Cochise Stronghold, where Sandra Ridder, who is part Apache, is trying to retrieve an item she buried eight years ago, before going to prison for killing her husband. The next day hikers find her corpse, while Sandra's 15-year-old daughter, Lucinda, and the girl's pet red-tailed hawk go missing. Could Lucinda, who seems to be a troubled loner, have killed her mother as revenge for her father's murder? Joanna starts to investigate shortly before she's to be married. Then Clayton Rhodes, the neighbor who helps feed Joanna's animals, dies suddenly, and unexpectedly bequeaths his ranch to her. Clayton's estranged daughter feels she should have inherited the property. Unreasonably and viciously, she blames Joanna for exerting undue influence over her father. The tangled threads of Joanna's personal life come close to overwhelming her professional one, and she has to exercise all of her time management skills to keep the murder inquiry on track. Her fianc , Butch Dixon, comes off as way too perfect to be human, but his parents, in an amusing touch, are seriously dysfunctional. Sometimes the dialogue is stiff, but generally this is a solid installment in a worthy series. The Arizona desert, as usual in Jance's mysteries, plays an unforgettable part in this atmospheric tale. Mystery Guild dual main selection. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

As a member of the Ekumen!s embassy on the planet Aka, Sutty undertakes a delicate mission that leads her to a mountain village reported to contain the last remnants of a dying culture. Following a trail of subtle clues concealed in stories and folk sayings, Sutty discovers the suppressed history of a planet willing to abandon its old ways in the name of progress. Le Guin!s latest addition to her Hainish cycle (e.g., Rocannon!s World) continues her exploration of human culture and society through the filter of the far future. (Le Guin was inspired by Chairman Mao!s brutal suppression of Taoism in China.) This parable of the modern world!s headlong rush toward monocultural sterility exemplifies the author!s elegant simplicity and keen insight. A priority purchase for libraries. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

YA-Final preparations for Sheriff Joanna Brady's wedding are interrupted by the abrupt death of her elderly neighbor and by the slaying of a newly released convicted murderer, Sandra Ridder. The protagonist tries to balance the demands of her personal life with her professional priorities, but tensions escalate when the victim's daughter runs away from her grandmother's home in an attempt to protect herself from her mother's murderer. As the plot moves toward the final resolution, Brady's police skills and experience allow her to pull all the loose ends together, resulting in a story with never a dull moment. Readers of the earlier titles will recognize many of the characters, yet all of them are clearly drawn and have vivid personalities. Jance describes the Southwest desert both in terms of beauty and danger. The panoramic scenery and cloudless days realistically contrast with the rough terrain, the roads full of potholes and ruts, and dry, sometimes deadly land. Young adults who enjoy strong women as main characters and mystery as a genre will love reading about Sheriff Brady and the police matters she so ably handles.-Pam Johnson, Fairfax County Public Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Devil's Claw A Joanna Brady Mystery Chapter One Lucy waited until she knew her grandmother was asleep before she left the house and quietly wheeled her bike out of the shed. The afternoon's bitter quarrel had continued to torment her the whole time she had sorted through the few possessions she would need to take with hera bedroll, a few clothes, a heavy, sheepskin-lined jacket, a canteen of water, some food pilfered from the kitchen, her grandmother's .22 pistol, and, of course, the diskette. Her mother's precious diskette. The diskette that had meant more to Sandra Ridder than anything else. That diskette, Lucy Ridder knew, was the whole reason her father had died. It was cold enough outside that she could see her breath. Across the Sulphur Springs Valley the full moon had risen high over the horizon, casting enough of an eerie yellow glow across the landscape that Lucy could see to ride. After pushing the bike for the better part of half a mile, Lucy stopped and once again sent that same wild and keening cry off across the night-still desert. She called and waited. Moments later, she was rewarded by the flap of Big Red's wings overhead. Once he settled gently onto her leather-thong-wrapped handlebar, Lucy no longer felt nearly as alone or as frightened. "Will she come, do you think?" Lucy asked the bird. Big Red didn't answer, but then he didn't need to. After all, Lucy knew the answer to that question herself, She had known it all along. Of course Sandra Ridder would come, just as she had eight years earlier -- in secret, in the middle of the night, and without Grandma Yates' knowledge. Big Red had learned to ride on the handlebars of Lucy's bike long before he could fly. From the time he was little more than a ball of fluff, he had loved riding perched on the leatherwrapped handlebar with his wings half-spread and his hooked beak pointing into the wind. As he had grown, it seemed to Lucy that Big Red's partially unfurled wings always served to make them more aerodynamic. They often took long weekend jaunts to the upper end of Cochise Stronghold. In the wild and protected reaches of the cliff-bound canyon where the noted Apache chieftain, Cochise, had often secluded his band, Lucy and her unlikely companion would while away the long weekend hours. This, however, was the first time that the two of them had made this pilgrimage together in the dark of night. Three different times Lucy heard vehicles approaching from behind, and twice she met vehicles driving toward her. On each occasion, Lucy wheeled the sturdy mountain bike off the road. While Big Red hustled onto low-lying branches, Lucy disappeared into underbrush to wait until the danger of discovery was past. Pumping along, Lucy felt physical warmth seeping back into her body right along with the anger she harbored toward her mother. And as she rode, the memory of that other nighttime trip to Cochise Stronghold -- one made from Tucson and in her mother's old Nissan -- was still vivid in Lucy's mind. Sandra Ridder had come to the Lohse YMCA to collect herdaughter. Even though the ballet class had barely started, she had ordered Lucy to get dressed and come along. Her face had been bruised and bleeding and she seemed so agitated that at first Lucy had thought Sandra was drunk. That did happen at times, although it happened far less frequently now that Lucy's father had gone to treatment and quit drinking. Once in the car, Lucy learned that her mother wasn't drunk. She was angry. Furious! As soon as the car doors closed, she had wrestled Lucy's backpack away from her daughter and dug through it, pawing all the way to the bottom. "That son of a bitch!" she had exclaimed at last, pulling out the diskette Lucy's father had given her at lunchtime. "I knew it had to be here!" Sandra continued. "They looked everywhere else, so I knew he must have given it to YOU." Lucy didn't know who "they" were. But she did know that her father had placed the diskette in her backpack. She also knew that real physical danger lurked in her mother's anger, and right then fear overpowered everything else. She had shrunk into the far corner of the car seat and had tried not to listen as her mother ranted and raved about her father and about the terrible things he had done. After they left the lights of Tucson behind them and all the time they were driving the familiar roads to Cochise County's Dragoon Mountains, Lucy had assumed they were going to see her two grandmothers. Grandma Yates, her mother's mother, and her great-grandmother, Christina Bagwell, lived just off Middlemarch Road in the foothills of the Dragoon Mountains. Instead, Sandra had driven her Nissan someplace else -- to a place that was nearby and almost as familiar as Grandma Yates' ranch -- Cochise Stronghold. The Ridders and Lucy's two grandmothers had often had family picnics in the campground there. This time, though, Sandra had pulled overand stopped right beside the entrance. As she put the car in park, Sandra had told Lucy to get in the backseat. "Go to sleep," she said. "And don't you make a sound." Lucy hadn't made a sound, but she hadn't gone to sleep, either. Instead, peering out through the back window, Lucy had watched as her mother carefully removed a stack of fistsized rocks from beneath the rough-hewn FOREST SERVICE sign at the entrance to the park. Then, once the rocks had been moved aside, Sandra had hidden something deep in the earthen cavity created by the missing rocks. In the dark, Lucy had been unable to see the object her mother was so carefully and secretly burying, covering it over once again with the stack of rocks. Lucy assumed it had to be the diskette Sandra had retrieved from Lucy's backpack, but in the dark there was no way to tell for sure... Devil's Claw A Joanna Brady Mystery . Copyright © by J. Jance. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from Devil's Claw by J. A. Jance All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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