Cover image for The Linux problem solver : hands-on solutions for systems administrators
Title:
The Linux problem solver : hands-on solutions for systems administrators
Author:
Ward, Brian, 1972-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Francisco : No Starch Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
283 pages ; 23 cm + 1 computer optical disc (4 3/4 in).
Language:
English
Title Subject:
ISBN:
9781886411357
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
QA76.76.O63 W3655 2000 Book and Software Set Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

You've got Linux installed and running, but what do you do when the printer spits out a bunch of gibberish? Or you set up a network but only guests can login and users can't? Or it just won't connect to the Web--no matter what you try?

Solving the innumerable problems that arise on a Linux machine or network can be a full-time job. Fortunately, Brian Ward has written The Linux Problem Solver to ease the pain. The Linux Problem Solver helps solve difficult Linux snafus by integrating troubleshooting techniques with clear explanations and tutorials of Linux tools. With the first half of the book focusing on configuration tools, and the second half focusing on maintenance, this book guides you through the maze of advanced problems that confront any Linux user or system administrator. An indispensable quick reference, The Linux Problem Solver covers solutions to over 100 problems, including how to:

Troubleshoot problems with printing, filesharing, and connecting to a network. Configure and install software from source code. Compile and install a new Linux kernel. Debug a network connection and secure a system. Recover from a system crash and prevent serious damage in the future.

Each chapter covers a specific Linux issue with a clear treatment of common pitfalls including the symptom, the problem, and the fix, and you'll soon understand problems as they arise.

The CD-ROM directly supports the book's contents, with configuration files and many programs not included with most Linux distributions. The CD also doubles as an emergency boot disk with diagnostic recovery tools. Together with the book, this package is a must for anyone serious about starting or maintaining a Linux network.

Contrary to the license agreement in the book, all programs on the CD (except for nvi) are GPL and covered by the GNU Public License. You can get the source for every binary included on the CD-ROM at http://metalab.unc.edu/pub/Linux and ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu . The nvi license can be found at http://www.bostic.com/vi/docs/LICENSE .


Author Notes

Brian Ward is a Unix systems programmer and is the author of the Linux Kernel HOWTO. He has worked with Linux since 1993 and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Chicago.


Table of Contents

1 About This Book
1.1 Fighting Firesp. 1
What This Book Assumes You Knowp. 2
Brief Outline of Contentsp. 2
1.2 Conventionsp. 3
Dealing with Manual Pagesp. 4
Unix, Linux, and Linux Distributionsp. 4
1.3 Linux System Basicsp. 5
Init, /etc/inittab, init.d, rc.*p. 5
The Syslog Facilityp. 7
cronp. 8
The passwd Filep. 9
Devicesp. 10
Examining and Creating Devicesp. 11
Working with Disksp. 12
The /proc Filesystemp. 13
Untangling Quote Messesp. 14
2 Network Installation
2.1 Introductionp. 17
2.2 Basic Commands and Filesp. 17
Commandsp. 18
Adding a Routep. 19
2.3 PPP Configurationp. 22
pppdp. 22
pppd Optionsp. 25
Serial Devicesp. 27
PPP Configuration Filesp. 28
PAPp. 28
CHAPp. 29
PPP and Red Hat 6.xp. 30
Verifying a Correct Loginp. 30
2.4 Routing, IP Filters, Firewalls, and IP Masqueradingp. 31
Basic Routing and Subnetsp. 31
IP Forwardingp. 33
Firewallsp. 33
IP Chainsp. 33
2.5 Network Securityp. 38
Keep Things Simplep. 38
Restricting Accessp. 39
The Secure Shell (ssh)p. 40
Detecting Break-Insp. 44
What to Do if Someone Breaks Inp. 44
2.6 Diagnosticsp. 44
3 NFS, NIS, and Rdist
3.1 Introductionp. 51
3.2 NFS Clientsp. 52
Mounting a Filesystemp. 52
Fixed Mountsp. 53
The Automounting Daemonp. 53
NFS Mount Optionsp. 56
3.3 NFS Serversp. 57
Essentialsp. 57
Security Considerationsp. 58
NFS Alternativesp. 59
3.4 NISp. 59
Definitionsp. 59
NIS Clientsp. 59
NIS Serversp. 62
Setting Up the NIS Master Serverp. 64
When You Update a Filep. 65
Slave Serversp. 65
Netgroup Mapsp. 65
3.5 rdistp. 67
Optionsp. 68
Commandsp. 69
Dist Optionsp. 71
Using ssh with rdistp. 72
Larger-Scale Distributionsp. 75
4 MS-Windows and Appletalk Networks; Web Proxy Server
4.1 Introductionp. 77
4.2 SAMBAp. 77
SMB Shares and NetBIOSp. 78
SAMBA Daemonsp. 78
Workgroup and Network Browser Optionsp. 80
Name Resolution and the Imhosts Filep. 81
WINSp. 82
More Access Control Optionsp. 83
Printingp. 84
Filesharingp. 87
4.3 Netatalkp. 90
Netatalk Startup Scriptp. 92
Printingp. 94
Filesharingp. 95
4.4 Web Proxy Servicep. 98
Client Access Lists in squid.confp. 100
Client (Web Browser) Configurationp. 102
5 Printing
5.1 Introductionp. 105
5.2 Print Daemonsp. 106
Which Daemon?p. 107
/etc/printcapp. 107
A Typical Remote Printer Entry with lpd or LPRngp. 108
Common /etc/printcap Componentsp. 109
Network Printer Accessp. 111
LPRng Enhancementsp. 111
Using lpc to Control lpdp. 112
5.3 PostScript Printersp. 112
HP, HP-Like Printers, and Other PostScript Printersp. 113
LPRng ifhp printcapp. 113
Selecting Other Options with ifhp.confp. 116
Testing ifhp on the Command Linep. 117
Customizing PostScript Printersp. 117
Printing Textp. 118
AppleTalk Printersp. 118
SMB Printersp. 120
5.4 Ghostscript for Non-PostScript Printersp. 122
Using the uniprint Driverp. 122
Configuring Fonts and Fixing Font Problemsp. 123
Ghostscript Optionsp. 124
SMB Versionp. 125
5.5 printcap Generation and Distributionp. 126
The printer-list.m4 filep. 126
Macro Definitionsp. 127
Example: Generating a New printcap for mikadop. 128
5.6 Utilitiesp. 128
Additional Ghostscript Utilitiesp. 130
Converting PostScript to a Bitmapped Formatp. 130
5.7 Troubleshootingp. 131
6 Installing Software From Source Code
6.1 Binary and Source Distributionsp. 135
6.2 Required Toolsp. 136
How Does It All Fit Together?p. 137
Shared Librariesp. 137
6.3 A Typical Source Distributionp. 138
What to Do with Those Tarballsp. 139
Examine the Table of Contentsp. 140
Corrupt Filesp. 140
Taking a Look at the Extracted Source Filesp. 141
6.4 If a Package Uses GNU autoconfp. 142
Running configurep. 142
Important configure Optionsp. 144
Environment Variablesp. 144
6.5 When the Package Doesn't Use GNU autoconfp. 146
Editing Makefile, config.h, and Variantsp. 146
Imakefilesp. 149
Other Build Proceduresp. 150
6.6 Recommended Practicesp. 151
Where and When to Compile Softwarep. 151
Organizationp. 152
6.7 Troubleshooting Failed Compilesp. 154
Reading Error Outputp. 154
General Errorsp. 155
Linker Errorsp. 157
Skipping Lines in .c and .h Filesp. 158
Compiler Errorsp. 159
7 Kernel Upgrades
7.1 Introductionp. 163
Kernel Source Code and Versionsp. 164
What You Need to Build the Kernelp. 165
Setting Up Kernel Source Codep. 165
Put Your Unpacked Source Herep. 166
Checking Linksp. 166
Distribution Kernelsp. 167
7.2 Configuring the Kernelp. 167
The Processorp. 169
General Setupp. 170
Block Devicesp. 170
Networking Optionsp. 171
SCSI Supportp. 171
Character Devicesp. 172
Filesystemsp. 172
7.3 Building the Kernelp. 173
Verify Source Filesp. 173
Make the Kernel Imagep. 174
Test Your Imagep. 175
Build the Modulesp. 176
7.4 Testing and Installing the Kernelp. 176
LILOp. 177
7.5 Kernel Modulesp. 180
Kernel Module Commandsp. 181
Filesystem Modulesp. 181
Other Driversp. 182
SCSI Modulesp. 182
PCMCIA Cardsp. 182
7.6 Troubleshootingp. 183
8 Backups and Crash Recovery
8.1 Backups: Introductionp. 187
What You Should Back Upp. 188
8.2 A Survey of Devicesp. 188
SCSI Tape Drivesp. 188
IDE Tape Drivesp. 188
Removable Disksp. 189
CD Writersp. 189
Duplicate Hard Drivesp. 189
8.3 Working with Tapesp. 189
Setting Up Your Tape Drivep. 189
Tape Layoutp. 190
mtp. 191
tarp. 194
ddp. 194
cpiop. 195
dump and restorep. 196
8.4 Automated Backups with Amandap. 197
Configuring Amandap. 198
Testing Your Configurationp. 202
Backing Up with amdumpp. 203
Automating Amandap. 204
Advanced Configuration: Important amanda.conf Settingsp. 204
Restoring Files with amrecoverp. 206
Using Amanda Log Files for Recoveries if amrecover Is Unavailablep. 207
8.5 Crash Recoveryp. 208
The Rescue CD-ROMp. 208
Using an Intermediate RAM Diskp. 210
Different Boot Kernelsp. 210
8.6 Fixing Filesystemsp. 211
Operating fsck Manuallyp. 211
tune2fs and debugfsp. 212
Recognizing and Repairing System File Problemsp. 215
9 User Environments
9.1 Introductionp. 217
9.2 Shell Startup Files: Basicsp. 218
Setting the Pathp. 218
Manual Page Pathsp. 220
Promptsp. 220
Aliasesp. 221
Default Programs: Shells, Editors, and So Onp. 222
A Default Userp. 223
Default Permissionsp. 224
Commands in Shell Startup Filesp. 224
9.3 bash and shp. 226
bash Aliasesp. 228
9.4 tcsh and cshp. 228
9.5 A Few X Window Start-up Filesp. 230
X Startup: .xinitrc and .xsessionp. 231
X Startup: xdmp. 232
X Resourcesp. 235
Default .Xdefaults Filesp. 239
A Final Word on Simplicityp. 239
Lexiconp. 241
Problems Listp. 245
About the CD-ROMp. 251
Indexp. 259