Cover image for The Iroquois in the War of 1812
Title:
The Iroquois in the War of 1812
Author:
Benn, Carl, 1953-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, [1998]

©1998
Physical Description:
xi, 272 pages, 20 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 23 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780802043214

9780802081452
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library E99.I7 B35 1998 Adult Non-Fiction Grosvenor Room Non-Circ
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Summary

Summary

Until now, the story of Iroquois participation in the War of 1812 has not received detailed examination, and there have consequently been major gaps in our understanding of the Iroquois, their relations with Euroamerican society, and the course of the war itself. The Iroquois in the War of 1812 proves that, in fact, the Six Nations' involvement was 'too significant to ignore.'

Benn explores this involvement by focusing on Iroquois diplomatic, military, and cultural history during the conflict. He looks at the Iroquois' attempts to stay out of the war, their entry into hostilities, their modes of warfare, the roles they played in different campaigns, their relationships with their allies, and the effects that the war had on their society. He also details the military and diplomatic strength of the Iroquois during the conflict, despite the serious tensions that plagued their communities.

This account reveals how the British benefited more than the Americans from the contributions of their Iroquois allies, and underscores how important the Six Nations were to the successful defence of Canada. It will appeal to general readers in both Canada and the United States and will have relevance for students and scholars of military, colonial, and Native history.


Summary

Until now, the story of Iroquois participation in the War of 1812 has not received detailed examination, and there have consequently been major gaps in our understanding of the Iroquois, their relations with Euroamerican society, and the course of the war itself. The Iroquois in the War of 1812 proves that, in fact, the Six Nations' involvement was 'too significant to ignore.'

Benn explores this involvement by focusing on Iroquois diplomatic, military, and cultural history during the conflict. He looks at the Iroquois' attempts to stay out of the war, their entry into hostilities, their modes of warfare, the roles they played in different campaigns, their relationships with their allies, and the effects that the war had on their society. He also details the military and diplomatic strength of the Iroquois during the conflict, despite the serious tensions that plagued their communities.

This account reveals how the British benefited more than the Americans from the contributions of their Iroquois allies, and underscores how important the Six Nations were to the successful defence of Canada. It will appeal to general readers in both Canada and the United States and will have relevance for students and scholars of military, colonial, and Native history.


Reviews 2

Choice Review

Benn's very well written book is most valuable as an exposition of the Iroquois in early-19th-century Canada. Benn presents the Six Nations' participation in the war and the aftermath forcefully and thoroughly. However, this work is not sufficient for an understanding of the roles of Native Americans in the northern theaters of the war. Other aboriginal nations' activities and experiences are not adequately considered. For example, the great Shawnee leader, Tecumseh, appears in only about half a dozen pages. Further, the publisher has not done well by this book, presenting it in a dense format that makes it seem crowded and oppressive. Nevertheless, it is essential for advanced readers and those interested in carrying the story of the Iroquois beyond the era considered in Francis Jennings' major books. There is a helpful section of black-and-white pictures and two maps. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. R. Fingerhut; formerly, California State University, Los Angeles


Choice Review

Benn's very well written book is most valuable as an exposition of the Iroquois in early-19th-century Canada. Benn presents the Six Nations' participation in the war and the aftermath forcefully and thoroughly. However, this work is not sufficient for an understanding of the roles of Native Americans in the northern theaters of the war. Other aboriginal nations' activities and experiences are not adequately considered. For example, the great Shawnee leader, Tecumseh, appears in only about half a dozen pages. Further, the publisher has not done well by this book, presenting it in a dense format that makes it seem crowded and oppressive. Nevertheless, it is essential for advanced readers and those interested in carrying the story of the Iroquois beyond the era considered in Francis Jennings' major books. There is a helpful section of black-and-white pictures and two maps. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. R. Fingerhut; formerly, California State University, Los Angeles


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