Cover image for The only menopause guide you'll need
Title:
The only menopause guide you'll need
Author:
Moore, Michele, gynecologist.
Publication Information:
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xi, 166 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780801864070

9780801864087
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
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Angola Public Library RG186 .M66 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Boston Free Library RG186 .M66 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Frank E. Merriweather Library RG186 .M66 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Audubon Library RG186 .M66 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

This text offers women a direct approach to their questions about the menopause whilst recognizing the individuality of women in addressing their concerns. Dr Moore encourages the reader to assess her individual situation by looking at her own medical history and talking with a health adviser. She helps the reader make informed choices about her treatment, should treatment be chosen as the way forward, and offers a balanced account of options which range from traditional medical practice to holistic and alternative approaches. Above all, she encourages the reader to accept responsibility for her choices and to deal with the consequences of those choices while remaining involved throughout the process. She also emphasizes the need for each woman to monitor her health condition closely and to reassess her situation as her health needs change through the years.


Summary

Because women want a direct approach when seeking answers to questions about menopause, Dr. Michele Moore has written a book that recognizes the individuality of women as it addresses their concerns in dealing with the changes of menopause. The Only Menopause Guide You'll Need is written for all women who are making decisions about treatment for symptoms of menopause. Dr. Moore invites the reader to assess her individual situation by looking into her own medical history and talking with a trusted health advisor. She helps the reader make informed choices about her treatment, should treatment be chosen, and offers a balanced account of options that range from traditional medical practice to holistic and alternative approaches. Above all, she encourages the reader to accept responsibility for her choices and to deal with the consequences of those choices while remaining proactive throughout the process. She also emphasizes the need for each woman to monitor her health condition closely and to reassess her situation as her health needs change through the years. Dr. Moore incorporates in the book her own experience with perimenopause, menopause, and postmenopause, as well as stories of her friends, neighbors, colleagues, and patients. She provides information about symptoms and treatment--including lifestyle changes and herbal and homeopathic remedies in addition to the treatments offered by traditional allopathic medicine. Hers is an empathetic and broad-minded voice that draws readers in at the same time it informs them, so that they can deal with inevitable changes in body, mind, and spirit. "As women, we are accustomed to cycles and seasons, but the crossing of the threshold of menopause into autumn brings grief, rage, fear, and great sadness to many women. Have you ever on a luminous autumn day had a shiver of anticipation of winter to come? And felt regret at the passing of the summer flowers and warmth? You might forget at that moment about the different pleasures of winter, and that spring and autumn come again, and that the seeds that are dormant or started in winter burst forth in glory come spring." -- from The Only Menopause Guide You'll Need


Author Notes

Michele Moore, M.D., is a physician in private practice in Keene, New Hampshire.


Michele Moore, M.D., is a physician in private practice in Keene, New Hampshire.


Reviews 4

Publisher's Weekly Review

Since the 2001 publication of the first edition of Moore's well-received book, menopause has come into the media spotlight. Research showing that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can have negative side effects has many women rethinking the wisdom of approaching menopause as a medical problem. Moore, a physician in private practice in New Hampshire, calls menopause a "phase of development" not unlike adolescence and encourages readers to be patient with, and attentive to, themselves in this transitional time. She offers professional and personal advice about menopause's emotional and physiological symptoms, explaining complementary treatments, such as herbal supplements, meditation and exercise, as well as traditional therapies. She reviews recent data on HRT and devotes a chapter to estradiol, a very powerful estrogen she refers to as "the forgotten estrogen." Moore includes specific recommendations for coping with symptoms ranging from night sweats to low libido, and outlines menopausal women's "major health concerns," namely, osteoporosis, cancer and heart disease. "Most of the physical discomforts of the menopausal process are transient and can be eased using a combination of therapeutic approaches described in the pages of this book," she writes. "The drive toward the completeness of self can be a lasting legacy of this process." Women looking for a comforting guide to menopause, with practical information as well as a sense of spirituality, will find it here. (Nov. 30) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Two women who have experienced menopause share their personal stories along with advice for others. Posner, who had a family history of breast cancer, decided to write a book about her trial-and-error experience with nonhormonal approaches to treating the symptoms of menopause. Wanting to avoid both natural and synthetic estrogens, she researched and mapped her own course of treatment, relying on exercise, diet, and massive amounts of supplements. Written more like a autobiography than a medical book, her story isn't really that interesting, and Posner throws out some options like acupuncture because she "just felt it was not the way I wanted to treat menopause." An optional purchase, recommended only where there is a great interest in first-person health narratives. Women who really want authoritative help deciding what they should do will find better information in Moore's book. Moore also mentions her personal experience and does, in fact, recommend some of the same therapies that Posner uses, but this is advice coming from a medical practitioner. As a physician in private practice, she advocates starting small, using the least toxic treatments for symptoms such as hot flashes, migraines, and osteoporosis. She is open to all types of treatments ranging from homeopathy to hormone replacement. A more balanced treatment of menopause that includes allopathic and alternative therapies, her book is recommended for public and consumer health libraries.--Elizabeth Williams, Houston Acad. of Medicine-Texas Medical Ctr. Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Since the 2001 publication of the first edition of Moore's well-received book, menopause has come into the media spotlight. Research showing that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) can have negative side effects has many women rethinking the wisdom of approaching menopause as a medical problem. Moore, a physician in private practice in New Hampshire, calls menopause a "phase of development" not unlike adolescence and encourages readers to be patient with, and attentive to, themselves in this transitional time. She offers professional and personal advice about menopause's emotional and physiological symptoms, explaining complementary treatments, such as herbal supplements, meditation and exercise, as well as traditional therapies. She reviews recent data on HRT and devotes a chapter to estradiol, a very powerful estrogen she refers to as "the forgotten estrogen." Moore includes specific recommendations for coping with symptoms ranging from night sweats to low libido, and outlines menopausal women's "major health concerns," namely, osteoporosis, cancer and heart disease. "Most of the physical discomforts of the menopausal process are transient and can be eased using a combination of therapeutic approaches described in the pages of this book," she writes. "The drive toward the completeness of self can be a lasting legacy of this process." Women looking for a comforting guide to menopause, with practical information as well as a sense of spirituality, will find it here. (Nov. 30) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Two women who have experienced menopause share their personal stories along with advice for others. Posner, who had a family history of breast cancer, decided to write a book about her trial-and-error experience with nonhormonal approaches to treating the symptoms of menopause. Wanting to avoid both natural and synthetic estrogens, she researched and mapped her own course of treatment, relying on exercise, diet, and massive amounts of supplements. Written more like a autobiography than a medical book, her story isn't really that interesting, and Posner throws out some options like acupuncture because she "just felt it was not the way I wanted to treat menopause." An optional purchase, recommended only where there is a great interest in first-person health narratives. Women who really want authoritative help deciding what they should do will find better information in Moore's book. Moore also mentions her personal experience and does, in fact, recommend some of the same therapies that Posner uses, but this is advice coming from a medical practitioner. As a physician in private practice, she advocates starting small, using the least toxic treatments for symptoms such as hot flashes, migraines, and osteoporosis. She is open to all types of treatments ranging from homeopathy to hormone replacement. A more balanced treatment of menopause that includes allopathic and alternative therapies, her book is recommended for public and consumer health libraries.--Elizabeth Williams, Houston Acad. of Medicine-Texas Medical Ctr. Lib. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Chapter 1 Symptoms You May Have Now: Perimenopause, Menopause, and Postmenopausep. 1
Chapter 2 Health Concerns Now: Cardiovascular Disease, Osteoporosis, and Endometrial and Breast Cancerp. 17
Chapter 3 Overview of Therapies: Allopathic, Complementary, Herbal, and Homeopathicp. 36
Chapter 4 Therapeutic Approaches in Perimenopausep. 58
Chapter 5 Therapeutic Approaches in Menopausep. 87
Chapter 6 Therapeutic Approaches in Postmenopausep. 95
Chapter 7 Estriol: The Forgotten Estrogenp. 105
Chapter 8 Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Multitude of Choicesp. 114
Conclusion: Vision and Responsibilityp. 126
Appendix 1 Diets for Improved Health and Fitnessp. 129
Appendix 2 Patient's Record of Symptoms, Diagnostic Tests, and Therapiesp. 133
Resourcesp. 139
Glossaryp. 143
Referencesp. 147
Indexp. 159
Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Chapter 1 Symptoms You May Have Now: Perimenopause, Menopause, and Postmenopausep. 1
Chapter 2 Health Concerns Now: Cardiovascular Disease, Osteoporosis, and Endometrial and Breast Cancerp. 17
Chapter 3 Overview of Therapies: Allopathic, Complementary, Herbal, and Homeopathicp. 36
Chapter 4 Therapeutic Approaches in Perimenopausep. 58
Chapter 5 Therapeutic Approaches in Menopausep. 87
Chapter 6 Therapeutic Approaches in Postmenopausep. 95
Chapter 7 Estriol: The Forgotten Estrogenp. 105
Chapter 8 Hormone Replacement Therapy: A Multitude of Choicesp. 114
Conclusion: Vision and Responsibilityp. 126
Appendix 1 Diets for Improved Health and Fitnessp. 129
Appendix 2 Patient's Record of Symptoms, Diagnostic Tests, and Therapiesp. 133
Resourcesp. 139
Glossaryp. 143
Referencesp. 147
Indexp. 159

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