Cover image for Failing working-class girls
Title:
Failing working-class girls
Author:
Plummer, Gillian.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Stoke-on-Trent : Trentham, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xvii, 231 pages ; 23 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction -- Ch. 1. An historical perspective: defining and reinforcing the subordination of working-class women through education -- Ch. 2. A sociological perspective: educational failure of post-war working-class children -- Ch. 3. A psychological perspective: making the working classes invisible -- Ch. 4. Analytical frameworks -- Ch. 5. Addressing an imbalance -- Ch. 6. Life in a working-class family -- Ch. 7. Parental and peer support for education -- Ch. 8. Schooling a social equaliser? taking a closer look -- Ch. 9. Conclusion -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index.
ISBN:
9781858561745

9781858561738
Format :
Book

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Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library LC2052 .P55 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

The discussion among the author and her degree-winning working class woman subjects affords insights into the backgrounds of working-class girls. It shows how both mothers and fathers held low expectations of education and what it might offer their daughters, so did little to support their education. It exposes the pattern of early marriage with an unskilled and often exploited partner who, whether earning or not, saw himself as the sole provider and even the possessor of his wife and daughters. It turns a spotlight on teachers and reveals how, instead of encouraging these misfits to succeed, they themselves discriminated against the bright working-class girls who managed to gain entry to privileged schools or grammar streams.


Summary

The discussion among the author and her degree-winning working class woman subjects affords insights into the backgrounds of working-class girls. It shows how both mothers and fathers held low expectations of education and what it might offer their daughters, so did little to support their education. It exposes the pattern of early marriage with an unskilled and often exploited partner who, whether earning or not, saw himself as the sole provider and even the possessor of his wife and daughters. It turns a spotlight on teachers and reveals how, instead of encouraging these "misfits" to succeed, they themselves discriminated against the bright working-class girls who managed to gain entry to privileged schools or grammar streams. Not a lot has changed. At a time when all concern is focused on the underachievement of working-class boys, this book exposes the plight of the numerically largest group of children in our schools.


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