Cover image for The bean bible : a legumaniac's guide to lentils, peas and every edible bean on the planet!
Title:
The bean bible : a legumaniac's guide to lentils, peas and every edible bean on the planet!
Author:
Green, Aliza.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Philadelphia, PA : Running Press Book Publishers, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xiii, 338 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780762406890
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Clearfield Library TX803.B4 G74 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Orchard Park Library TX803.B4 G74 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Anna M. Reinstein Library TX803.B4 G74 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Frank E. Merriweather Library TX803.B4 G74 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...
Niagara Branch Library TX803.B4 G74 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Earthy, elegant, affordable, and nourishing, the virtuous legume gets star billing in this comprehensive bean primer written by chef, consultant and food writer Aliza Green. More than 200 delectable recipes-gathered from Green's travels and from famous chefs and restaurants-are accompanied by essential information on bean varieties, cooking methods, and equipment.


Author Notes

Aliza Green is a noted chef, food columnist, and restaurant consultant.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

This comprehensive guide to the world of beans and bean cookery belongs in every cookbook collection. Beans figure in most gastronomic traditions, whether Asian, African, American, or European. Yankees have baked beans, southerners have black-eyed peas, Mexicans have frijoles refritos, Brazilians have feijoada, Egyptians have ful, and Indians have dal. As with the potato and tomato, the real history of the bean in cooking begins with the opening of the New World in the sixteenth century. Europe once knew only fava beans, chickpeas, lentils, and peas. Asia introduced the soybean. Most of the beans taken for granted today originated in the Americas, and they figure in both native and colonial cooking. Contemporary chefs are discovering the virtues of obscure heirloom varieties such as Jacob's Cattle and Scarlet Runners. Exotic bean dishes such as hummus have become part of everyday American fare. Green furnishes recipes using many bean varieties and highly diverse ethnic traditions to illustrate the adaptability of this superior vegetable protein source. --Mark Knoblauch


Library Journal Review

Green, a columnist for the Philadelphia Inquirer, has an impressive and wide-ranging cooking background, and she's lived and traveled around the globe as well, so her imaginative, mouthwatering recipes have an intriguing international sheen. She starts with the basics, describing more than 100 types of beans, peas, and other legumes, then moves on to more than 200 recipes. Numerous boxes and chef's notes provide a huge amount of information on the legume family and on food and techniques as well. Although there are recipes for hearty comfort food like Diner-Style Baked Beans with Bacon, Green regards beans as "a culinary delight," and many of her dishes, such as French Lentil and Foie Gras-Stuffed Ravioli with Truffle Oil, elevate legumes to a gourmet treat. Both a reference and a cookbook, this is highly recommended. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Google Preview