Cover image for Global distributed applications with Windows DNA
Title:
Global distributed applications with Windows DNA
Author:
Madrona, Enrique.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Artech House, 2000.
Physical Description:
xx, 329 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
"Artech House computing library."
Language:
English
ISBN:
9781580530866
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

An examination of the Microsoft Windows Distributed Internet Architecture (DNA). Focusing on Internet and intranet technologies utilizing the Component Object Model (COM) and Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS) as a development platform, it describes how all parts of DNA fit together and how they can be used to build successful, robust distributed applications. This is a guide to building DNA applications of less complexity and greater scalability, resulting in increased productivity, better performance, and reduced problem-solving time.


Author Notes

Enrique Madrona received his B.Sc. with Honors in Computer Science from the Open University, Nottingham, England.

is an Information Systems Technical Project Manager for The Lubrizol Corporation in Wickliffe, Ohio, where he manages global distributed projects. He also conducts research in the areas of remote automation, inter-process communications and concurrency management. Mr. Madrona is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the British Computer Society.

050


Table of Contents

Introductionp. xiii
What Is the Purpose of this Book?p. xiv
A Word about Visual Basicp. xvi
Who Is the Audience for this Book?p. xvii
Skills Needed to Read this Bookp. xviii
Structure of the Bookp. xviii
Resources and Additional Informationp. xviii
Acknowledgmentsp. xix
Section I Global Technologyp. 1
Chapter 1 Platforms and Technologiesp. 3
1.1 Overview of Current Global Technologiesp. 3
1.2 Enterprise Operating Systemsp. 7
1.2.1 Microsoft Windows NT Serverp. 8
1.2.2 Unixware and Other Unix Implementationp. 10
1.2.3 Sun Solarisp. 11
1.2.4 Linuxp. 11
1.3 Global Intranetsp. 12
1.4 Internetwork Protocols and Technologiesp. 16
1.4.1 HyperText Markup Language (HTML)p. 17
1.4.2 HyperText Transfer Protocol (HTTP)p. 18
1.4.3 Transfer Control Program/Internetwork Protocol - TCP/IPp. 19
1.4.4 Support and Development Toolsp. 20
1.5 Browsersp. 23
Chapter 2 Using Microsoft Technologiesp. 27
2.1 Why Microsoft Technology?p. 27
2.2 The Distributed Internet Applications Architecturep. 29
2.2.1 Windows DNA COM and DCOM Servicesp. 32
2.2.2 Windows DNA Transaction Servicesp. 34
2.2.3 Asynchronous Communications and Queuesp. 38
2.2.4 Internet Information Servicesp. 38
2.2.5 Universal Data Access Componentsp. 39
2.2.6 The Windows DNA Development Paradoxp. 40
Chapter 3 Mapping the Technology to the Businessp. 43
3.1 Mapping the Technology to the Businessp. 43
3.1.1 Reducing the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO)p. 46
3.2 Mapping Windows DNAp. 48
3.2.1 The Impact of Object and Component Technologyp. 49
3.2.2 The Impact of Middlewarep. 50
3.2.3 The Impact of Messaging, Communications, and Data Servicesp. 52
3.2.4 The Impact of Development Productsp. 54
3.2.5 The Impact of Server and Internet Servicesp. 55
Section II Global Architecturep. 57
Chapter 4 Architectural Reviewp. 59
4.1 The Client/Server Modelp. 59
4.1.1 Two-Tier Client/Server Systemsp. 59
4.1.2 Three-Tier Client/Server Systemsp. 61
4.1.3 @n-Tier Client/Server Systemsp. 63
4.1.4 Distributed Client/Server Systemsp. 64
4.1.5 Internet Client/Server Systemsp. 65
4.2 Object Technologyp. 67
4.2.1 Encapsulationp. 68
4.2.2 Inheritancep. 68
4.2.3 Polymorphismp. 71
4.2.4 Virtual Methods and Abstractionp. 71
4.2.5 Representing Objectsp. 72
4.2.6 Object Life Cycle: Instantiation, Invokation, and Disposalp. 73
4.2.7 Business Objectsp. 74
4.2.8 Object Modelsp. 75
4.2.9 Object Repositoriesp. 76
4.3 Componentwarep. 77
4.3.1 Components and Objectsp. 77
4.3.2 Component Life Cyclep. 78
4.3.3 Interfacesp. 79
4.3.4 Business Componentsp. 81
4.3.5 Component Repositoriesp. 82
4.4 The Component Object Modelp. 83
4.4.1 COM Component Architecturep. 84
4.4.2 DCOMp. 89
4.5 Universal Data Accessp. 90
4.5.1 Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC)p. 91
4.5.2 OLE DBp. 92
4.5.3 ODBCp. 93
4.5.4 ActiveX Data Objects (ADO)p. 95
4.5.5 Remote Data Services (RDS)p. 97
4.5.6 Choosing a Data Access Componentp. 97
4.6 Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS)p. 98
4.6.1 Principles of MTS-based Distributed Systemsp. 99
4.6.2 The Paradigm Shift: Stateful vs.Stateless Programmingp. 104
4.6.3 Building MTS-enabled Components With VBp. 108
4.7 The Microsoft Message Queue (MSMQ)p. 111
4.8 Conclusionp. 112
Chapter 5 Windows DNA Development Toolsp. 113
5.1 Internet Information Serverp. 113
5.1.1 The Microsoft Management Consolep. 113
5.1.2 IIS Process and Component Managementp. 117
5.1.3 Setting Up and Configuring a Web Site Using IISp. 119
5.2 Microsoft Visual Studiop. 121
5.2.1 Microsoft Visual Sourcesafe (VSS)p. 123
5.2.2 Visual Studio Analyzer (VSA)p. 124
5.2.3 Visual Modeler (VM)p. 125
5.3 Microsoft Visual Basicp. 126
5.3.1 Visual Basic and COMp. 127
5.4 HTML, DHTML, and XMLp. 129
5.4.1 HyperText Markup Language (HTML)p. 129
5.4.2 Client-Side Scriptingp. 133
5.4.3 Cascading Style Sheetsp. 134
5.4.4 Dynamic HTML/DHTMLp. 135
5.4.5 Extensible Markup Language (XML)p. 136
5.5 Active Server Pages (ASP)p. 137
5.5.1 ASP - Important Language Issuesp. 138
5.5.2 The ASP Object Modelp. 139
5.5.3 The Global.ASAp. 145
5.6 Conclusionp. 145
Chapter 6 Building Global Distributed Applicationsp. 147
6.1 Software Application Structurep. 147
6.1.1 Securityp. 151
6.1.2 System Objectsp. 152
6.1.3 Accessing Datap. 154
6.1.4 Component Architecturep. 159
6.2 Design Considerationsp. 161
6.2.1 Component Design MTSp. 162
6.2.2 Object Hierarchies and Object Modelsp. 167
6.2.3 Component Packages and Marshalingp. 168
6.2.4 Business Rules and Processesp. 170
6.2.5 Script Dos and Don'tsp. 171
6.3 Complying With COMp. 172
6.3.1 Compliance by Defaultp. 174
6.3.2 Complying the Right Wayp. 175
6.3.3 Designing Interfacesp. 177
6.4 Complying With MTSp. 182
6.4.1 Designing MTS Componentsp. 184
6.4.2 Instance Managementp. 185
6.4.3 Transaction Managementp. 190
6.4.4 State Managementp. 192
6.4.5 Thread and Process Managementp. 194
6.5 The Role of ASP in Distributed Applicationsp. 195
6.6 Conclusionp. 196
Chapter 7 Testing and Debuggingp. 197
7.1 Testing and Debuggingp. 197
7.1.1 Testing Windows DNA Applicationsp. 197
7.1.2 Debugging Windows DNA Applicationsp. 204
7.1.3 Code Debuggersp. 205
7.1.4 Debugging Issuesp. 207
7.2 Error Detection, Interpretation, and Correctionp. 213
7.2.1 Error Detectionp. 213
7.3 Handling Problemsp. 223
7.3.1 Setting Up the Error Handler Componentp. 234
7.3.2 Understanding the Error Handler Componentp. 234
7.3.3 Using the Error Handlerp. 237
7.4 Conclusionp. 238
Section III Managing the Global Projectp. 239
Chapter 8 Managing the Software Projectp. 241
8.1 Managing DNA Projectsp. 241
8.2 Project Organizationp. 243
8.3 Project Requirements and Planningp. 247
8.3.1 Gathering Initial Requirementsp. 247
8.3.2 Planningp. 254
8.4 Risk Managementp. 261
8.4.1 Risk Assessmentp. 262
8.4.2 Risk Controlp. 265
8.5 Project Plan and Phased Deliveryp. 265
8.5.1 Identifying Project Phasesp. 266
8.5.2 Project Planp. 267
8.6 Change Managementp. 271
8.7 Project Documentationp. 273
Chapter 9 Managing the Development Processp. 277
9.1 Managing Software Developmentp. 277
9.1.1 Software Elementsp. 278
9.1.2 Organizing Developmentp. 281
9.2 Change Managementp. 289
9.3 Project Buildsp. 291
9.4 Deploymentp. 293
9.5 Quality Assurancep. 299
9.6 Enhancement and Maintenance Considerationsp. 302
9.7 Planning for Performancep. 306
9.8 Conclusionp. 308
Appendixp. 309
About the Authorp. 319
Indexp. 321