Cover image for Super smoothies : 50 recipes for health and energy
Title:
Super smoothies : 50 recipes for health and energy
Author:
Barber, Mary Corpening, 1969-
Publication Information:
San Francisco : Chronicle Books, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
132 pages : color illustrations ; 23 cm
General Note:
Includes index.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780811825405
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library TX815 .B372 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

Encouraged by more than 180,000 copies of Smoothies sold, the best-selling authors of Smoothies, Wraps , and Cocktail Food are back to bring the blender into the new millennium. These days, smoothie lovers want more than just fruit-filled refreshmentthey want great nutrition along with great taste. Super Smoothies offers 50 energy-enhancing, health-boosting recipes. Whether you're looking for a potassium-charged postworkout drink, a flu-fighting immune system booster, or a kid-friendly breakfast on the go, Super Smoothies has a delicious, nutrition-packed smoothie for every lifestyle. With its eye-catching design and luscious full-color photography, Super Smoothies will turn any kitchen into a fabulous juice bar.


Author Notes

Mary Corpening Barber is the best-selling coauthor of Smoothies and Wraps (0-8118-1812-8)along with her sister Sara, who are the owners of Thymes Two Catering in San Francisco.

Mary Corpening Barber is the best-selling coauthor of Smoothies and Wraps (0-8118-1812-8)along with her sister Sara, who are the owners of Thymes Two Catering in San Francisco.

E.J. Armstrong is a Seattle-based photographer whose work has been published in Travel & Leisure and elsewhere.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Chapter One ten tips for super smoothies 1. The very best smoothies are made from the highest-quality fruit. For the most flavorful smoothies, always use perfectly ripe fruit in the prime of its season. Also, use organic fruit whenever possible. 2. A smoothie is only as good as the sum of its parts. Use all natural ingredients, if possible. Avoid artificial ingredients and sweeteners such as aspartame (which is often inconspicuously labeled) and NutraSweet, which can leave an unpleasant aftertaste. 3. Use fresh frozen fruits within two weeks. Their flavor fades the longer they stay in the freezer. If your frozen fruit is freezer-burned, rinse it with cold water to avoid an unpleasant aftertaste. Also, scrape any freezer burn from sorbets or frozen yogurts before adding to smoothies. 4. Experiment with flavored ice cubes. This is a great way to create a cool and thick smoothie, full of concentrated flavor. To make, simply pour the juice, tea, or nectar of your preference into an ice cube tray and freeze. 5. For the best consistency, use very small ice cubes or crushed ice. Though blender manufacturers advertise that their machines can pulverize ice cubes, no matter what their size, this is not always the case. For best results, always crush ice before putting it into a blender. Put ice cubes in a strong self-sealing plastic bag, remove excess air, and place the bag on a firm surface such as a counter. Smash the cubes with a rolling pin or a heavy metal pan until crushed. 6. For a thick, dense smoothie, add an extra handful of frozen fruit, crushed ice, or frozen yogurt or sorbet. If you prefer a thinner, lighter consistency, simply add more liquid. At different times during the day. we prefer different textures and temperatures. Use these recipes as guidelines and adjust them to suit your own taste. 7. It's our opinion that the very best-tasting smoothies are additive free. We find that nutritional supplements compete with the pure fresh taste and smooth texture of a smoothie. If you are adamant about using additives, try adding them to a small portion of the smoothie so you can enjoy the remainder in its pure, delicious state. 8. If your smoothie is not sweet enough, due to the sugar content of the fruit, add a bit of honey, maple syrup, barley malt, brown rice syrup, stevia (a sweet-tasting plant extract), or another natural sweetener. Half of a very ripe banana is another way to make a smoothie sweeter. 9. We prefer low-fat dairy products in our smoothies. They help us keep calories and fat at a minimum and still taste great. But nonfat dairy products may be substituted in any of the recipes in this book. 10. No smoothie is ever better than in the first few minutes after it's made. For the best possible flavor and texture, drink them right away. If you must make them ahead, you'll notice that some smoothies begin to separate after 20 minutes. If that happens, simply stir it or put the smoothie back into the blender for a minute to bring it back to its original consistency. fruit glossary APPLES The crisp, tart taste of an apple can add a lot to a smoothie. We sometimes add peeled or unpeeled cubes of apples, and other times we use juice, concentrate, or cider, and sometimes applesauce. Though not particularly rich in vitamins, other than a little vitamin C, apples do contain high levels of pectin that can help reduce cholesterol levels. When buying juice and applesauce, check to be sure that they contain no artificial sweeteners or flavorings. APRICOTS Pale orange apricots with a slight pink blush look like plump baby cheeks. We think they're one of the prettiest fruits around. They also happen to be a powerhouse of beta-carotene, an antioxidant that's essential for vision, growth, reproduction, and a sound immune system. Apricots are also a good source of potassium and fiber and are rich in cancer-fighting antioxidants. In the summer when apricots are in season, we use fresh ones in our smoothies. The rest of the year we rely on canned apricots, apricot nectar, or dried apricots, which can be reconstituted and added to smoothies. Dried apricots are one of the most concentrated sources of beta-carotene available and an excellent source of iron. BANANAS It's hard to imagine what smoothies would be without bananas. They are used more often than any other fruit, lending not only flavor, but also the characteristic creamy texture that gives smoothies their name. They are a fantastic source of potassium, an electrolyte often lost during exercise, as well as magnesium, folate, and vitamin B6, which may decrease the risk of heart disease. Buy them at any stage and let them ripen at home. BLACKBERRIES You may love these luscious dark berries for their sweet, juicy taste, but nutrition researchers value them for the role they may play in preventing heart disease and reducing high blood pressure. They are rich in antioxidants, potassium, and compounds known as saponins, all key nutrients for a healthy heart. You'll find fresh blackberries in the market in July and August. Look for plump berries with a deep black color. Blackberries with their green hulls attached may look pretty, but were likely picked too soon and may be overly tart. Frozen unsweetened ones, a good choice for smoothies, are available all year round. The tiny blackberry seeds can be a nuisance, so you may want to pour your blackberry smoothies through a strainer. BLUEBERRIES We used to think of blueberries as quaint little fruits to add to muffins and sprinkle over cereal, but we've learned that these innocent-looking berries have one of the highest known antioxidant levels of any fruit. That means that blueberries may help protect against cancer, eye conditions, and some of the problems that accompany aging. They are also one of the best sources of salicylate, a natural aspirinlike compound that has been shown to reduce inflammation. You'll find them fresh in the markets in the late spring when blueberries are at their peak, but these fruits freeze well, too, so you can use them in smoothies any time of the year. You can also buy frozen unsweetened blueberries. CANTALOUPE Orange-fleshed cantaloupe is one of the best nutritional buys in the fruit world. Half an average melon provides more than the daily requirement for vitamins A and C, and less than 100 calories. Cantaloupe is also an excellent source of potassium, which aids in regulating the exchange of nutrients between cells. You'll find these miracle melons in the market during the summer months. The best ones have a thick, close netting on the rind, yield gently to pressure, and have a fruity aroma. CHERRIES Almost everyone loves cherries, but folks who work out regularly can appreciate this fruit for more than just its great taste. Cherries are rich in potassium and the B vitamins, as well as A and C. They also contain anthocyanins, which are antioxidants that may protect against some types of cancer. Cherries are available in a wide range of color, from extra-large and black (Bing) to large and yellow-red (Royal Anne) to smaller and red (Lamberts). All of these sweet cherries make wonderful smoothies. Be sure to remove the pits and stems before you add cherries to the blender. You can extend their short season by freezing cherries in self-sealing plastic bags. CRANBERRIES For years, women have told one another about the wonders that cranberry juice can do in relieving bladder infections. It turns out that there is more than anecdote to support this recommendation. Researchers have discovered an as yet unnamed compound in cranberries that prevents bacteria from attaching to the bladder and can aid in washing out the pathogens that cause infections. Stock up on fresh cranberries when they're available during the holiday season, and freeze them to use all year round. DATES Calcium, magnesium, fiber, and folate are some of the great reasons to love dates, but the truth is we add them to smoothies because they taste good. They're also a wonderful source of iron, a particularly important mineral for women. You can find dates in the dried fruit section of your market all year round. Just remember to remove the pits, or you could damage your blender. Dates tend to dry out when not stored properly and can be difficult to blend. If the ones you have on hand have hardened, pour boiling water over them, cover, and let stand for 15 minutes before draining. GRAPEFRUIT While most everyone loves the tart, sweet taste of grapefruit, those who are at risk of heart disease can appreciate them for more than just their flavor. In fact, they might look at a grapefruit as a heart pill with a rind. These popular citrus fruits contain vitamin C, which can help stabilize plaque lesions in arteries, and pectin, which can reduce cholesterol levels. They also contain potassium, which helps to combat high blood pressure. They are also a source of antioxidants that may prevent some cancers, and folate, an important compound for preventing birth defects. Pick a pink grapefruit and you'll get a dose of beta-carotene as well. Both grapefruit juice and seeded sections can go into the blender for making smoothies. If you're using fresh grapefruit, take extra care to remove all the white pith. Despite the fact that it's nutrient-rich, it has a bitter taste that can ruin a smoothie. GRAPES (GREEN) Big bunches of green grapes are one of our favorite snacks. They're also a part of some of our favorite smoothies. These little green gems are a good source of vitamin C, an important antioxidant, and potassium, an important mineral that contributes to a healthy nervous system and a regular heart rhythm. seasonal fruit chart SPRING (mid-March to mid-June) blueberries strawberries SUMMER (mid-June to mid-September) apricots blackberries cantaloupe cherries grapes honeydew litchi nuts mangos nectarines papayas peaches plums raspberries watermelon AUTUMN (mid-September to mid-December) apples cranberries dates pears WINTER (mid-December to mid-March) bananas dried fruits grapefruit kiwis oranges pineapple GRAPES (RED) We've all heard the news that red wine can protect against heart disease. Well, the same chemical, called resveratrol, is found in red grapes, which means that those who want to avoid the negative effects of alcohol can still benefit from some of the good things wine has to offer. Red grapes also offer a good dose of potassium, which contributes to a healthy nervous system and a regular heart rhythm. Grape juice and concentrate offer the same benefits. GUAVA NECTAR Soft, seductive guavas are one of the more luscious fruits we know, but unfortunately they can be hard to come by. Luckily, we can always get our hands on guava nectar. Its rich perfume and exotic tutti-frutti flavor make a wonderful addition to a smoothie. Guavas are an excellent source of beta-carotene, which promotes good vision and helps maintain healthy skin, and vitamin C, which contributes to healthy gums and teeth and aids in the healing of wounds. HONEYDEW MELON The subtle, sweet flavor of these pale green melons is one we never tire of, and their dense, creamy flesh is perfect for smoothies. Ripe honeydew is perhaps the sweetest of melons. It's a terrific low-calorie addition to a smoothie and a good source of potassium and vitamin C. KIWIS These oversized berries are something of a diamond in the rough. Their fuzzy brown peel offers no clue to the jewel-like fruit that lies just beyond it. Slice one in half and you'll reveal a starburst of emerald green flesh surrounded by a ring of black seeds. Just one of these fruits has twice the vitamin C of an orange. They have relatively few calories and are a good source of potassium and fiber. Those seeds that give the fruit such a distinctive look can give a smoothie a bitter taste and odd texture if ground up in a blender. We've found that a food processor leaves the seeds intact, and we recommend always using one instead of a blender when making smoothies with kiwis. LEMON JUICE Sometimes a sweet, fruity smoothie just begs for a little bit of acid to balance the flavor. That's when we reach for the lemons. Like all citrus, lemons are bursting with vitamin C. The fresher the lemon juice, the better it tastes. LIME JUICE The lemon's little green cousin first gained nutritional fame as a cure for scurvy. Today limes, and other citrus too, are heralded for their disease-fighting antioxidants and the cholesterol-lowering pectin of their flesh. The bright taste of fresh lime juice is sometimes all that's needed to bring an overly sweet smoothie into line. LITCHI NUTS If you've never tasted litchi nuts, get ready to be wowed. They have a glorious perfume and a sweet floral flavor that make for a heavenly smoothie. These magnificent Chinese fruits are an excellent source of vitamin C and are rich in potassium, too. MANGOS The lovely yellow-orange flesh of a mango indicates that it is a rich source of beta-carotene. These tropical fruits also contain potassium, as well as vitamin C, the nutrient that can give a boost to an ailing immune system and help protect an ailing heart. A mango's creamy texture is ideal for making smoothies, and you can find mangos in the market most any time of the year. To choose a ripe one, press gently against the flesh. It should feel subtly soft. Another test for ripeness is to hold the fruit up to your nose and breathe deeply. Those with no scent are not ready to eat, and ones that smell sour are past their prime, but if you smell a sweet, fruity perfume, take the fruit home and enjoy a mango at its peak. NECTARINES Some folks think of nectarines as peaches without the fuzz. Although their flavor is similar, nectarines have somewhat firmer flesh, and nutritionally speaking, they are even richer in the antioxidants that bolster the immune system. They're also an excellent source of vitamin C. ORANGES Everyone knows that oranges are a good source of vitamin C and are often recommended to fight colds. But not everyone realizes that vitamin C is an antioxidant that strengthens the immune system. Oranges also contain pectin, which may reduce cholesterol levels and decrease the risk of cancer. They are also an excellent source of folate, which is an important nutrient for pregnant women. Folate can also help lower elevated homocysteine levels, possibly reducing cardiovascular risk. Note that women at risk of osteoporosis can appreciate the added benefits of calcium-fortified orange juice. If you're looking for a quick substitute for fresh orange segments, use canned mandarin oranges instead. PAPAYAS The orange fruit tinged with pink is a dead giveaway to a papaya's beta-carotene content. These smooth-fleshed tropical fruits also contain antioxidants, which can promote a healthy immune system, and an enzyme that aids in digestion. You'll also get a dose of vitamin C and fiber when you add papaya to a smoothie. Its creamy texture makes for a lusciously rich-tasting drink. PEACHES Like other orange-fleshed fruits and vegetables, peaches are rich in beta-carotene. They also contain vitamin C and potassium; all of these work together to aid in the fight against cancer, heart disease, and strokes, and may even improve memory and protect against some of the negative effects of aging. Fresh, frozen, or canned in their own juices, peaches can bring flavor and texture to smoothies all year round. PEARS The intense flavor and heady perfume of a fresh, ripe pear are hard to resist. But pears have a lot more going for them than just flavor. Like other fruits, pears are a good source of fiber and energy-giving carbohydrates. Pear nectar offers all the great taste and health benefits of a fresh pear without the bother of cutting and peeling the fruit. PINEAPPLE There's something about pineapple smoothies that makes us want to drop a paper umbrella in the glass and go sit on a-beach towel. The citrusy, sweet-tart taste of pineapple makes it one of our favorite smoothie ingredients. Pineapple smoothies can help soothe a sore throat and ease the pain of inflamed gums. They are also a good source of vitamin C and potassium. To pick a ripe pineapple, look for a sweet, aromatic smell. Another clue is to tug on a leaf. If it comes off easily the fruit is usually ripe and ready to eat. PLUMS There are literally hundreds of varieties of plums, and we've never met one we didn't like. Their tart, sweet taste is perfect for an icy cold smoothie on a hot afternoon. Plums are rich in vitamin C, an antioxidant that can help stall some of the effects of aging. They are also a source of potassium, a mineral that may help reduce high blood pressure. PRUNES These tasty dried plums are the butt of a lot of bad jokes, but truth is that they are an absolutely delicious dried fruit. Along with their well-known stores of fiber, prunes are also an excellent source of beta-carotene, iron, potassium, and vitamin C. If your prunes seem particularly firm, you may want to rehydrate them in boiling water or 10 minutes. Drain before putting them in the blender. RASPBERRIES For most of our lives, we've loved raspberries just for their sweet taste. Then we started researching this book and learned that there's more to these beautiful berries than wonderful flavor. High levels of potassium make raspberries a terrific food to enjoy after a trip to the gym, where we often deplete our store of this important nutrient. Raspberries are also loaded with salicylates, a compound that has been shown to reduce inflammation, and are a good source of vitamin B6 and magnesium. Because they freeze well, these summer berries can be used in smoothies all year round. You can also buy frozen unsweetened raspberries. STRAWBERRIES A juicy red strawberry is surely one of nature's greatest achievements. Not only do they have a wonderful flavor, they also pack a whole lot of nutritional value into a little bitty berry. Strawberries are a rich source of vitamin C, and like a lot of other berries, they are high in disease-fighting phytochemicals. Though you can now find fresh strawberries year round, they are never better than in the late spring. Choose those with a heady perfume, the best indication of flavor, or buy frozen unsweetened ones to use any time. Strawberry nectar is another wonderful way to get that great berry taste into your blender. WATERMELON It's the water that makes this bright red-fleshed melon such a good choice for an after-workout smoothie or for any other time you might be dehydrated. Rich in the electrolytes that are lost during exercise, watermelons are nature's Gatorade. They are also a good source of vitamin C and may protect against some cancers. (Continues...)

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