Cover image for Medieval tales : that kids can read & tell
Title:
Medieval tales : that kids can read & tell
Author:
Czarnota, Lorna.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Little Rock, AR : August House, 2000.
Physical Description:
96 pages ; 26 cm
Summary:
Presents traditional stories about the Middle Ages along with tips for storytellers.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
750 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 5.0 2.0 60437.
Genre:
ISBN:
9780874835892

9780874835885
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library PZ8.1.C993 MF 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Clearfield Library PZ8.1.C993 MF 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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Grand Island Library PZ8.1.C993 MF 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Lackawanna Library PZ8.1.C993 MF 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Clarence Library PZ8.1.C993 MF 2000 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Just who was Robin Hood? What did William Tell do that was so special? Why is Joan of Arc so famous? Author Lorna Czarnota presents medieval tales that answer these questions and many more in a fun, simplified way that allows kids to add their own details and use their own imaginations in their retellings.


Reviews 1

School Library Journal Review

Gr 3-6-A great book for kids who are interested in storytelling. It has simple versions of many medieval tales arranged by country: from England, "Robin Hood"; from Switzerland, "William Tell"; from France, "Joan of Arc"; and from Scotland, Robert Bruce. (It is somewhat disconcerting that the more common appellation Robert the Bruce is not used). There are tales of Beowulf and of Saladin, and lesser-known ones such as the story of Duke Lech of Poland. Each of the selections is about a page in length, short enough to learn easily. Each chapter includes a "tips" section, a history of the story, and a pronunciation guide. The final section describes the role of the storyteller in medieval times and includes a chapter on how to look and sound like one. The author tells readers how to tailor the story to the audience, but she does not mention that it need not be memorized and repeated verbatim. One of the first rules in most storytelling classes is that the tellers should become comfortable with the material and make it their own. Apart from that, this is a helpful guide. There is a good glossary of medieval terms and comprehensive source notes.-Marlyn K. Roberts, Torrance Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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