Cover image for Digital sound processing for music and multimedia
Title:
Digital sound processing for music and multimedia
Author:
Kirk, Ross.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Oxford, [England] ; Boston : Focal Press, 1999.
Physical Description:
xviii, 334 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780240515069
Format :
Book

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Status
Central Library TK7881.4 .K58 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

Provides an introduction to the nature, synthesis and transformation of sound which forms the basis of digital sound processing for music and multimedia. Background information in computer techniques is included so that you can write computer algorithms to realise new processes central to your own musical and sound processing ideas. Finally, material is inlcuded to explain the way in which people contribute to the development of new kinds of performance and composition systems. Key features of the book include: #65533; Contents structured into free-standing parts for easy navigation #65533; `Flow lines' to suggest alternative paths through the book, depending on the primary interest of the reader. #65533; Practical examples are contained on a supporting website. Digital Sound Processing can be used by anyone, whether from an audio engineering, musical or music technology perspective. Digital sound processing in its various spheres - music technology, studio systems and multimedia - are witnessing the dawning of a new age. The opportunities for involvement in the expansion and development of sound transformation, musical performance and composition are unprecedented. The supporting website (www.york.ac.uk/inst/mustech/dspmm.htm) contains working examples of computer techniques, music synthesis and sound processing.


Author Notes

Ross Kirk co-founded the first specialised university course in Music Technology, and currently teaches signal processing and computer based topics at the University of York. He is the principal architect of the MIDAS-MILAN multiprocessor system for music synthesis.
Andy Hunt has developed a series of innovative lecture courses in a variety of music technology subjects, including 'User Interfacing Techniques' and 'MIDI applications for C programming'. He is the author of the MidiGrid musical performance software, and is co-developer of the MIDAS system.


Table of Contents

Series introductionp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. xi
Introduction and backgroundp. xiii
Part 1 Contextp. 1
1 Sound generation and recording in the twentieth centuryp. 3
1.1 Setting the contextp. 4
1.2 The effect of technology on sound productionp. 4
1.3 Musical changes from 1900-1950p. 5
1.4 Early systems for electronic sound generationp. 9
1.5 Development of recording technologyp. 12
1.6 Electronic music studiosp. 14
1.7 Live electronic musicp. 16
1.8 Synthesisersp. 17
1.9 Digital soundp. 21
1.10 The performance interfacep. 23
1.11 Digital computers with performance interfacesp. 24
1.12 The digital revolutionp. 26
1.13 Performance instruments in the MIDI agep. 29
1.14 The microcomputerp. 31
1.15 Systems for capturing performance gesturep. 33
1.16 Interactive music environmentsp. 35
1.17 Summaryp. 37
Part 2 Sounds and signalsp. 39
2 Sound and signals in music technology and digital audiop. 41
2.1 The electrical analogue of acoustic signalsp. 42
2.2 The nature and content of signalsp. 43
2.3 The effect of linearity and gain on the transmission of signalsp. 52
2.4 The effect of frequency response on the transmission of signalsp. 55
2.5 Summaryp. 59
3 Digital audiop. 61
3.1 Preparation: frequency translationp. 62
3.2 The sampling processp. 66
3.3 Pulse code modulation (PCM) systemsp. 72
3.4 Characteristics of digital audio systemsp. 77
3.5 Synthetic audio systemsp. 82
3.6 Summaryp. 89
Part 3 Music technology systemsp. 91
4 MIDI: connecting instruments togetherp. 93
4.1 Musical backgroundp. 94
4.2 The environment from which MIDI emergedp. 95
4.3 The development of MIDIp. 96
4.4 Designing instrument connectionsp. 98
4.5 The MIDI specification - hardwarep. 99
4.6 The MIDI specification - messagesp. 100
4.7 Format and construction of MIDI messagesp. 104
4.8 Extensions to the original MIDI specificationp. 111
4.9 Limitations of MIDIp. 114
4.10 The future of instrumental connectionsp. 115
4.11 Summaryp. 116
5 The structure of common music technology systemsp. 118
5.1 Types of electronic music equipmentp. 119
5.2 Methods of digital sound generationp. 124
5.3 Methods of digital sound processingp. 129
5.4 Digital sound generation techniquesp. 130
5.5 Digital sound processing techniquesp. 138
5.6 Summaryp. 167
Part 4 Computer fundamentalsp. 169
6 An introduction to digital logicp. 171
6.1 Elementary logic and binary systemsp. 171
6.2 Combinatorial logic and logic gatesp. 172
6.3 Functional description of the operation of gatesp. 176
6.4 Some simple examples of combinatorial logic circuitsp. 177
6.5 Sequential logicp. 178
6.6 Summaryp. 182
7 Computers and programsp. 183
7.1 The essential architecture of a computer systemp. 184
7.2 A look inside the central processing unitp. 188
7.3 The representation of instructions in a computerp. 194
7.4 The representation of data in a computerp. 200
7.5 The components of programsp. 204
7.6 Conditional branching and the program status wordp. 207
7.7 Subroutines and stacksp. 209
7.8 Summaryp. 216
8 Interfacing: the use of the computer as a componentp. 217
8.1 Interfacing from the point of view of the programmerp. 218
8.2 Interfacing from the point of view of the processorp. 220
8.3 Interfacing from the point of view of the interfacep. 220
8.4 Parallel and serial portsp. 224
8.5 Digital to analogue, and analogue to digital conversionp. 226
8.6 Polled, interrupt driven and direct memory access (DMA) interfacesp. 231
8.7 The Texas Instruments TMS320C30 Digital Signal Processor (DSP)p. 238
8.8 The MIDI interfacep. 242
8.9 PC sound cardsp. 245
8.10 Summaryp. 247
Part 5 Programming for sound generation and processingp. 251
9 Computer programming for musical applicationsp. 253
9.1 The need for computer programmingp. 254
9.2 Types of programming languagep. 254
9.3 Structured programming for musicp. 258
9.4 Programming at control ratep. 259
9.5 Data generation and outputp. 261
9.6 Data input and transformationp. 268
9.7 Summaryp. 271
10 Programming for audio and visual synthesisp. 273
10.1 Programming at audio ratep. 274
10.2 The unit generator conceptp. 274
10.3 Programming librariesp. 275
10.4 MIDASp. 276
10.5 Audio synthesis and signal processing examplesp. 279
10.6 Programming for audio-visual synthesisp. 290
10.7 Summaryp. 295
Part 6 Interface design for the futurep. 297
11 Designing the musician-machine interfacep. 299
11.1 Human-computer interactionp. 300
11.2 Styles of interfacep. 300
11.3 Models of user interactionp. 304
11.4 User interfaces in computer musicp. 307
11.5 Suggested areas of changep. 310
11.6 Design exercisep. 315
11.7 Summaryp. 326
Indexp. 327

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