Cover image for Ghosts of the Titanic
Title:
Ghosts of the Titanic
Author:
Pellegrino, Charles R.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : William Morrow, 2000.
Physical Description:
viii, 293 pages 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 9.0 17.0 44861.
Corporate Subject:
ISBN:
9780688139551
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

A member of the team that discovered the Titanic on the ocean floor recreates the final day of the ship in detail, using new technology to peer deeper into the ship than anyone has ever looked.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Something of a Renaissance man, Pellegrino was certainly qualified to write Her Name, Titanic (1987) and remains so for this new summary of the most famous ship-sinking ever, which collects the results of 12 additional years of underwater archaeology, including the salvage and analysis of Titanic wreckage. Pellegrino assumes basic knowledge of the chronology, dramatis personae, and major controversies of the sinking as well as of the discovery and study of the wreck; but even for Titanic buffs who grasp the basics tightly, the book is quite a feast. The verbiage sometimes goes over the top, but Pellegrino explores a boatload of intriguing hypotheses. Could the ship have floated longer? Could the stern have floated independently after breaking off? Could a coal-bunker fire explain many mysteries? Etcetera, etcetera. Pellegrino damns Captain Lord of the Californian, eases his earlier indictment of Titanic's Captain Smith, and continues to justly admire Captain Rostron of the Carpathia and Titanic designer and victim Thomas Andrews. What more to say? Another absorbing Titanic tome. --Roland Green


Publisher's Weekly Review

Pellegrino's sequel to his 1996 bestseller, Her Name, Titanic, is a tour de force incorporating new information about the shipwreck and the nightmarish human dramas of survivors, reconstructed from letters, diaries and oral histories. An oceanographer, paleontologist and space scientist, Pellegrino draws on his 1996 deep-sea expedition to the Titanic as well as other marine scientists' recent research. Contrary to the popular notion that the ship succumbed to a gigantic gash after it hit an iceberg, he shows that the Titanic, which sank on its maiden voyage in 1912, was felled by a series of ice stabs and bullet-hole-like punctures adding up to just 12 square feet of openings through which tons of water poured. The Titanic's Grand Stairway, all five stories of it, probably broke free and floated out of the disintegrating ship, he concludes. According to survivors' testimony, the accident occurred because the ship was traveling at a reckless speed: its owners decided to arrive in New York a day early as a publicity coup, and this meant lighting extra boilers, which led to an out-of-control bunker fire. The ship didn't simply run up against a lone icebergDit encountered a field of icebergs over 10 miles wide. By correlating eyewitness accounts, Pellegrino establishes that many shootings did occur on the ship, as crew and officers armed with guns prevented third- and fourth-class passengers from boarding the lifeboats. His fresh re-creation of the Titanic's final hours provides an eerie and astonishing adventure, a time capsule gracefully wrapped in elegant prose, deserving a place alongside Walter Lord's classic A Night to Remember. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

YA-Many mysteries about the sinking of the Titanic continue to generate controversy among experts. Among the larger of these: the actual cause, what happened to the bodies of the many victims, why the "mystery ship" failed to come to the rescue, and the motivations behind several seemingly inexplicable actions by crew and passengers. Pellegrino, author of Her Name, Titanic (Morrow, 1990) looks again at these and other puzzles, illustrating his points with fine drawings of discoveries made during scientific expeditions, and with a generous number of diagrams of the ship as it might have appeared at different points in the disaster. He describes the new forensic evidence found by recent expeditions to the wreck, and views it from a variety of scientific perspectives. He places these insights in the context of the historical record-and comes, in the end, to some surprising new conclusions. Along the way, he asks many questions of his own, and, considering the behavior of the people involved, offers a valuable meditation on the nature of leadership. The author's wide-ranging musings might seem at first to be rather disorganized-and, to some readers, overly personal-but for most, the book delivers the ghosts promised by its title. As Pellegrino writes, "People who love and perhaps even worship technology often forget humanity. The Titanic never lets you forget." A fascinating, thought-provoking account.-Christine C. Menefee, Fairfax County Public Library, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.