Cover image for Comprehensive history of the Jews of Iran : the outset of the diaspora
Title:
Comprehensive history of the Jews of Iran : the outset of the diaspora
Author:
Lavī, Ḥabīb, 1896-1984.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Tārīkh-i Yahūd-i Īrān. English
Publication Information:
Costa Mesa, CA : Mazda Publishers in association with the Cultural Foundation of Habib Levy, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
xix, 597 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction (1300-550 B.C.E.) -- The Achaemenids (550-330 B.C.E) -- Seleucids and Parthians (330 B.C.E.-226 C.E) -- The Sasanians (226-642 C.E.) -- Advent of Islam and rule of the Caliphs (642-847 C.E.) -- Tahirids, Saffarids, Samanids, Daylamites, and Ghaznavids (847-1038 C.E.) -- Seljuqs, Mongols, and Timurids (1038-1502 C.E.) -- The Safavids (1502-1722 C.E.) -- Afsharids and Zands (1722-1794 C.E.) -- The Qajars: form Muhammad Khan to Muzaffar al-Din Shah (1794-1907 C.E.) -- Constitutionalist revolution and the Pahlavi Dynasty (1907-1979 C.E.).
ISBN:
9781568590868
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library DS135.I65 L35513 1999 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Reviews 1

Choice Review

The account of the Jews of Iran is a vibrant chapter in the annals of Jewish history, yet it is also one of the least known and appreciated. This book is an abridgement of Levy's massive three-volume Persian-language work. It is a chronological study of the history of the Iranian Jewish community from hoary antiquity until the reign of Mohammad Reza Shah, a straightforward tale told with particular emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The author traces the ties between ancient Israel and Iran, and surveys religious and intellectual developments through the ages. He describes the Karaite movement, as well as the Khazars, and the role played by Iranian Jews in the transmission and advancement of Western sciences. The role of the Alliance Israelite universelle is also explored, and perhaps the most poignant pages are devoted to the episode of the "children of Teheran," Jewish children from Poland who took refuge in Iran on their way to the nascent State of Israel. Recommended for all those interested in this remarkable yet neglected community. All levels. S. D. Benin; University of Memphis


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