Cover image for The diary of a young girl : the definitive edition
Title:
The diary of a young girl : the definitive edition
Author:
Frank, Anne, 1929-1945.
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Achterhuis. English
Publication Information:
New York : Bantam, 1997, c1995..
Physical Description:
x, 335 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1080 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG+ 6.5 17.0 139354.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.9 21 Quiz: 00494 Guided reading level: Y.
ISBN:
9780553577129

9781435280632
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Central Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Non-Fiction Area
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Central Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Non-Fiction Area
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Newstead Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Biography
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Angola Public Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Biography
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Clearfield Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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East Delavan Branch Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
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Eden Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Biography
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Eden Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Biography
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Lake Shore Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Lancaster Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
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Lancaster Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
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Marilla Free Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Work Room
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Julia Boyer Reinstein Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Classics
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Audubon Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
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Frank E. Merriweather Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
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Elma Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
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Elma Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
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Grand Island Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Non-Fiction Biography
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Anna M. Reinstein Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Non-Fiction Reading List
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Orchard Park Library D810.J4 F715 1995D Adult Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank's remarkable diary has since become a world classic--a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit.

In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the "Secret Annex" of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short.

Praise for The Diary of a Young Girl

"A truly remarkable book." -- The New York Times

"One of the most moving personal documents to come out of World War II." -- The Philadelphia Inquirer

"There may be no better way to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II than to reread The Diary of a Young Girl, a testament to an indestructible nobility of spirit in the face of pure evil." -- Chicago Tribune

"The single most compelling personal account of the Holocaust . . . remains astonishing and excruciating." -- The New York Times Book Review

"How brilliantly Anne Frank captures the self-conscious alienation and na#65533;ve self-absorption of adolescence." -- Newsday


Author Notes

Anne Frank, June 1929 - March 1945 Anneliesse Marie Frank was born on June 12, 1929 in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany. She was the second daughter of Otto and Edith Frank. Anne's father was a factory worker, who moved his family to Amsterdam in 1933 to escape the Nazi's. There he opened up a branch of his uncle's company and Anne and her sister Margot resumed a normal life, attending a Montessori School in Amsterdam.

The Germans attacked the Netherlands in 1940 and took control, issuing anti-Jewish decrees, and forcing the Frank sisters into a Jewish Lyceum instead of their old school. Their father Otto decided to find a place for the family to hide should the time come that the Nazi's came to take them to a concentration camp. He chose the annex above his offices and found some trustworthy friends among his fellow workers to supply the family with food and news. On July 5, 1942, Margot received a "call up" to serve in the Nazi "work camp." The next day, the family escaped to the annex, welcoming another family, the van Pels, which consisted of Hermann and Auguste van Pels and their son Peter. Fritz Pfeffer also came to stay with them, causing the count to come to eight people hiding in the annex.

Anne, Margot and Peter continued their studies under the tutelage of Otto, and all of the captives found ways to entertain themselves for the long years they remained hidden. On August 4, 1944, four Dutch Nazis came to arrest the eight, having discovered their hiding place through an informant. Anne's diary was left behind and found later by one of the family's friends. The eight were taken to prison in Amsterdam and then deported to Westerbork before being shipped to Auschwitz. At Auschwitz, the men were separated from the women and Hermann van Pels was immediately gassed. Fritz Pfeffer died at Neuenganme in 1944.

Anne, Margot and Mrs. van Pels were taken to Bergen-Belson, leaving behind Anne's mother, Edith, who died at Auschwitz of starvation and exhaustion in 1945. At Bergen-Belson, Anne and Margot contracted typhus and died of the disease in March of 1945. Anne was 15 and Margot was 17. The exact date and the place they were buried is unknown. Otto Frank was the only one of the original group of eight who were hidden in the annex to survive. He was left for dead at Auschwitz when the Russian Army came to liberate the camp. It is due to him that Anne's diary was published and became the success it is.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

This startling new edition of Dutch Jewish teenager Anne Frank's classic diary‘written in an Amsterdam warehouse, where for two years she hid from the Nazis with her family and friends‘contains approximately 30% more material than the original 1947 edition. It completely revises our understanding of one of the most moving and eloquent documents of the Holocaust. The Anne we meet here is much more sarcastic, rebellious and vulnerable than the sensitive diarist beloved by millions. She rages at her mother, Edith, smolders with jealous resentment toward her sister, Margot, and unleashes acid comments at her roommates. Expanded entries provide a fuller picture of the tensions and quarrels among the eight people in hiding. Anne, who died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in March 1945, three months before her 16th birthday, candidly discusses her awakening sexuality in entries that were omitted from the 1947 edition by her father, Otto, the only one of the eight to survive the death camps. He died in 1980. This crisp, stunning translation provides an unvarnished picture of life in the ``secret annex.'' In the end, Anne's teen angst pales beside her profound insights, her self-discovery and her unbroken faith in good triumphing over evil. Photos not seen by PW. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

This new translation of Frank's famous diary includes material about her emerging sexuality and her relationship with her mother that was originally excised by Frank's father, the only family member to survive the Holocaust. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

From the Introduction by Francine Prose Every masterpiece is unique, but some are more anomalous than others. If we consider all the volumes that have appeared so far in the Everyman series, the cornerstones and classics of our cultural tradition, The Diary of Anne Frank is, we may notice, the only one to have been written by a girl between the ages of thirteen and fifteen. If it seems improbable that a person of that tender age should have produced a work not just of maturity but of genius, that improbability only increases the awe we feel, or ought to feel, in the presence of a book that possesses all the qualities we expect of great memoirs and spiritual autobiographies, and, to some extent, of great novels. Varied and memorable characters are revealed in all their complexity and depth, summoned to life on the page complete with all their most admirable virtues and most maddening flaws, their engagingly and appallingly human quirks and contradictions. We find ourselves in the presence of a singular consciousness, a highly particular and utterly persuasive narrative voice, elastic and capacious enough to encompass the most day-to-day details of domestic life (how to peel potatoes!), incisive portrayals of the ways in which people behave under enormous stress, flights of speculative metaphysics, and passages of sophisticated inquiry into the mystery of human nature. Comparing Anne Frank's diary to the Confessions of Saint Augustine, the poet John Berryman point out that the diary allows its readers to watch the growth of a soul, the simultaneously quotidian and miraculous transformation that accompanies what Berryman termed "the conversion of a child into a person," a process that, in his view, had never been so brilliantly or even adequately described before Anne Frank tracked it in herself, and recorded it in her diary. "It took, I believe," wrote Berryman, "a special pressure forcing the child-adult conversion, and exceptional self-awareness and exceptional candour and exceptional powers of expression, to bring that strange or normal change into view." The diary reminds us of what it is like to go through a stage of life -- adolescence -- that all readers past childhood have endured and still remember, or have tried to forget. It speaks to us about the universal experiences of first love, family entanglements, hope and despair, society and solitude, terror and even boredom, and at the same time it reports on an utterly specific and exceptionally ugly period in our history, an era that is receding from living memory with every second that passes. Like all great art, it reveals something about the individual hand that created it, and something about what it means to be a human being -- in this case, what is require to maintain human decency and compassion in the most inhuman and dehumanizing circumstances. * The Diary of Anne Frank is among the most widely read and taught and (for a variety of reasons, most often its delicate but clear-eyed portrayal of adolescent sexuality) most frequently censored texts in the world; translated from the original Dutch into dozens of languages, it appears on the curriculum of schools everywhere. Viewing Laurent Cantet's 2008 French film, The Class ( Entre les murs ), set in a high school in the suburbs of Paris, we watch a group of teenagers, nearly all of the first-generation immigrants to France, studying and discussing the diary. In 2004, a segment of the CBS series 60 Minutes reported that North Korean schoolchildren were being instructed to see themselves as Anne Frank, and George W. Bush as the modern equivalent of Hitler. What most students learn is that Anne Frank began writing in the little book, with its checked cloth cover, soon after she received it as a gift from her parents on the occasion of her thirteenth birthday, in June 1942. Roughly a month after Anne commenced her giddy narrative of friends and boyfriends, childish allegiances and humorous experiences at school, her family went into hiding in a cramped attic (as it is often termed, though this common feature of Amsterdam canal-house construction more resembles what might be called a rear addition) above and behind the spice and pectin business her father Otto ran until the Nazi racial laws made it illegal for Otto, a Jew, to conduct any business at all. For the next twenty-five months, until August 1944, when the Frank family was arrested and deported, first to the Westerbork transit camp and afterwards to Auschwitz, the Franks -- Otto, his wife Edith, their daughters Margot and Anne -- shared the "secret annex" with the Van Pels family (Hermann, Auguste, and their son Peter) and a dentist named Fritz Pfeffer. As those months wore on, Anne's vivid account of their lives in hiding developed into a very different kind of book from anything that she, newly turned thirteen, could have imagined that she would be confiding in her journal. Excerpted from The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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