Cover image for Latkes, latkes, good to eat : a Chanukah story
Title:
Latkes, latkes, good to eat : a Chanukah story
Author:
Howland, Naomi.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Clarion Books, [1999]

©1999
Physical Description:
31 pages : color illustrations ; 24 x 26 cm
Summary:
In an old Russian village, Sadie and her brothers are poor and hungry until an old woman gives Sadie a frying pan that will make potato pancakes until it hears the magic words that make it stop.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
AD 380 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.2 0.5 35299.

Reading Counts RC K-2 2.5 2 Quiz: 19788 Guided reading level: N.
Genre:
ISBN:
9780395899038
Format :
Book

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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Fairy Tales
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Childrens Area-Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Current Holiday Item Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Holiday
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PZ8.H845 LAT 1999 Juvenile Non-Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Sadie and her four little brothers are very poor and always hungry. On the first night of Chanukah, Sadie performs a generous act, and in turn receives a frying pan that cooks up sizzling hot, golden latkes on command. Sadie tells her brothers never to use the magic pan, but when she goes out one afternoon, the mischievous boys can't resist. They remember the words to start the pan cooking . . . but what were the words to make it stop? This humorous tale of generosity and greed is accompanied by bright, cheerful illustrations depicting a traditional Russian village. An author's note and a recipe for Sadie's latkes are included.


Author Notes

Naomi Howland is the author and illustrator of several books for children, including The Matzah Man: A Passover Story and Latkes, Latkes, Good to Eat: A Chanukah Story. She lives in Claremont, California.


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-6. A story that combines elements of familiar folktales and "The Sorcerer's Apprentice." Sadie and her four brothers are not looking forward to Chanukah; they are poor, and there is nothing to eat. Sadie goes out to collect firewood but takes pity on an old woman and gives her the wood. In return, the woman gives Sadie a magic frying pan. It will cook as many potato latkes (pancakes) as the family wants until Sadie utters the magic words that make it stop. The pan works fine while Sophie cooks, but when she leaves, the boys try--with predictable results. Latkes fill the house, then the streets, until Sadie arrives home to say the magic words. By that time, there are more than enough latkes for the whole village to feast. Howland effectively sets her story in a Russian shtetl, using words, intonation, and especially pictures. Working in gouache and colored pencil, she offers a snowy landscape peopled with Jewish villagers who work hard and celebrate harder. Especially nice is the overview of the villagers on the last night of Chanukah men and women whirling under the stars eating all those latkes. --Ilene Cooper


Publisher's Weekly Review

Like most of this season's Hanukkah offerings, Howland's (ABCDrive!) uses the holiday as flavoring rather than the principal ingredient. Her agreeable outing combines a classic fairy tale plot with a shtetl setting and a touch of the Sorcerer's Apprentice. A girl does a kind deed for an old woman, who gives her a magic pan that will fry up latkes. Her brothers overhear the secret words that will start the pan cooking, but not those that will stop it (the words are "A great miracle happened there," to which dreidels also refer). Howland serves up friendly, folk-ish art, containing the excesses of the plot with down-to-earth depictions of people and village. Ages 5-8. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Sadie turns over the firewood she has gathered to a poor old woman she meets in the woods and is given a magic latke pan in return for her kindness. She is told the secret words to make it work and warned, "Only you may use my gift." The girl has been left alone during Chanukah to care for her four younger brothers and she puts the pan to good use by making piles of the delicious potato pancakes. She warns the boys not to use the pan while she goes out to invite the old woman to share their bounty on the last night of Chanukah, but of course the moment she leaves, they get busy making latkes and predictable chaos ensues. Howland's gouache and colored-pencil artwork is done in a Russian folk-art style to reflect the setting. This appealing story, told in the spirit of Tomie dePaola's Strega Nona (S & S, 1975), is perfect to share with a large group. A latke recipe and a note on the origins of Chanukah round out this holiday treat.-T.M. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.