Cover image for The encyclopedia of apocalypticism.
Title:
The encyclopedia of apocalypticism.
Author:
Collins, John J. (John Joseph), 1946-
Publication Information:
New York : Continuum, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
3 volumes : illustrations ; 25 cm
Language:
English
Contents:
v. 1. The origins of apocalypticism in Judaism and Christianity / edited by John J. Collins -- v. 2. Apocalypticism in Western history and culture / edited by Bernard McGinn -- v. 3. Apocalypticism in the modern period and the contemporary age / edited by Stephen J. Stein.
ISBN:
9780826410719

9780826410870

9780826410726

9780826410733

9780826412522

9780826412539

9780826412546

9780826412553
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
BL501 .E53 2000 V.1 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
BL501 .E53 2000 V.2 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...
Searching...
BL501 .E53 2000 V.3 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

Apocalypticism, broadly defined as the belief that God has revealed the imminent end of the ongoing struggle between good and evil throughout history, has been a major element in the three monotheistic Western religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Over the past 30 years, extensive scholarship has been devoted to the study of apocalypticism over the succeeding 20 centuries. The contemporary role of apocalyptic thought, both in America and in the world at large, has also been a subject of intense research. This reference work provides a survey of apocalypticism's role in Western history, from its origins down to the eve of the third millennium.


Summary

Volume two in a three part encyclopaedia on apocalypticism in various different cultures around the world.


Summary

Apocalyptism has been broadly defined as the belief that God has revealed the imminent end of the ongoing struggle between good and evil throughout history. It has been a major element in the three monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam and extensive scholarship has been devoted to apocalyptic study during the latter half of the 20th century. With contributions from 42 scholars, this encyclopedia in three volumes provides a comprehensive survey of apocalypticism's role in Western history from its origins down to the eve of the third millennium.


Author Notes

Authors Bio, not available


Reviews 5

Library Journal Review

As the millennium approaches, one can expect a demand for books relating to the apocalypse. This multivolume set, a masterfully conceived work covering the vast historical literature of apocalypticism, will disappoint the casual reader and utterly delight the serious scholar. Though it focuses narrowly on Judaism and Christianity, with a few articles on Islam and scattered mentionings of Persian, Greek, and Roman folk religions, such limiting was necessary to present this topic in an accessible manner. The three volumes comprise articles written by noted scholars of religious studies and literary criticism. Volume 1, edited by Collins (Univ. of Chicago), covers the beginnings of apocalypticism in the ancient Near East, moves through early Judaism, and ends at the Book of Revelation in the New Testament. Volume 2, edited by McGinn (Univ. of Chicago), begins with the apocalypticism in early Christian theology (100 C.E.) and concludes with discussions of apocalyptic influences in medieval and renaissance literature (up to 1800 C.E.). Of special interest are the articles by Roberto Rusconi on the Antichrist and by Robert E. Lerner on millennialism, both works relevant to anyone interested in biblical Armageddon. Volume 3, edited by Stein (Indiana Univ.), brings the discussion into the 20th century and focuses on the influences of apocalypticism on modern popular culture, art, science, politics, and thought. Although the articles are surprisingly readable for an academic text, the arcane nature of the topic makes casual reading difficult, and only those truly interested in a comprehensive exposition of apocalypticism will find treasures in this great work. There is nothing here for the fans of UFOs, crop circles, or the re-emergence of Atlantis or Mu. Strongly recommended for academic libraries, especially theological ones.‘Glenn Masuchika, Chaminade Univ. Lib., Honolulu (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

As the millennium approaches, one can expect a demand for books relating to the apocalypse. This multivolume set, a masterfully conceived work covering the vast historical literature of apocalypticism, will disappoint the casual reader and utterly delight the serious scholar. Though it focuses narrowly on Judaism and Christianity, with a few articles on Islam and scattered mentionings of Persian, Greek, and Roman folk religions, such limiting was necessary to present this topic in an accessible manner. The three volumes comprise articles written by noted scholars of religious studies and literary criticism. Volume 1, edited by Collins (Univ. of Chicago), covers the beginnings of apocalypticism in the ancient Near East, moves through early Judaism, and ends at the Book of Revelation in the New Testament. Volume 2, edited by McGinn (Univ. of Chicago), begins with the apocalypticism in early Christian theology (100 C.E.) and concludes with discussions of apocalyptic influences in medieval and renaissance literature (up to 1800 C.E.). Of special interest are the articles by Roberto Rusconi on the Antichrist and by Robert E. Lerner on millennialism, both works relevant to anyone interested in biblical Armageddon. Volume 3, edited by Stein (Indiana Univ.), brings the discussion into the 20th century and focuses on the influences of apocalypticism on modern popular culture, art, science, politics, and thought. Although the articles are surprisingly readable for an academic text, the arcane nature of the topic makes casual reading difficult, and only those truly interested in a comprehensive exposition of apocalypticism will find treasures in this great work. There is nothing here for the fans of UFOs, crop circles, or the re-emergence of Atlantis or Mu. Strongly recommended for academic libraries, especially theological ones.‘Glenn Masuchika, Chaminade Univ. Lib., Honolulu (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Choice Review

This splendid collection of essays explores religiously inspired conceptions of the end of history. Although the editors' purpose is to be inclusive of Western religious traditions--Judaism, Christianity and Islam--most of the essays (31 of 43) analyze the Christian tradition. Volume one deals with apocalypticism in religions of the ancient Near East, Judaism, and early Christianity. The second volume treats developments in Europe and the Near East, 100 C.E. to 1800 C.E., with most chapters devoted to the Middle Ages. The last volume discusses modern apocalyptic interpretations, including a half-dozen essays on American interpretations of the future. One-third of the final volume explores the influence of apocalyptic ideas on the broader culture, with articles on politics, literature, popular culture, etc. The Encyclopedia does not attempt a complete narrative history; instead, its 43 rather lengthy chapters (averaging about 30 pages each) function as highly informative encyclopedic entries. Addressing critical aspects of Western apocalypticism, the authors identify and define their topics carefully, develop independent interpretations, and supply excellent supporting annotated bibliographies. This superb encyclopedia represents the best current scholarship on an important subject; it richly deserves wide distribution. Upper-division undergraduates and above; academic and public libraries. W. L. Pitts Jr.; Baylor University


Library Journal Review

As the millennium approaches, one can expect a demand for books relating to the apocalypse. This multivolume set, a masterfully conceived work covering the vast historical literature of apocalypticism, will disappoint the casual reader and utterly delight the serious scholar. Though it focuses narrowly on Judaism and Christianity, with a few articles on Islam and scattered mentionings of Persian, Greek, and Roman folk religions, such limiting was necessary to present this topic in an accessible manner. The three volumes comprise articles written by noted scholars of religious studies and literary criticism. Volume 1, edited by Collins (Univ. of Chicago), covers the beginnings of apocalypticism in the ancient Near East, moves through early Judaism, and ends at the Book of Revelation in the New Testament. Volume 2, edited by McGinn (Univ. of Chicago), begins with the apocalypticism in early Christian theology (100 C.E.) and concludes with discussions of apocalyptic influences in medieval and renaissance literature (up to 1800 C.E.). Of special interest are the articles by Roberto Rusconi on the Antichrist and by Robert E. Lerner on millennialism, both works relevant to anyone interested in biblical Armageddon. Volume 3, edited by Stein (Indiana Univ.), brings the discussion into the 20th century and focuses on the influences of apocalypticism on modern popular culture, art, science, politics, and thought. Although the articles are surprisingly readable for an academic text, the arcane nature of the topic makes casual reading difficult, and only those truly interested in a comprehensive exposition of apocalypticism will find treasures in this great work. There is nothing here for the fans of UFOs, crop circles, or the re-emergence of Atlantis or Mu. Strongly recommended for academic libraries, especially theological ones.‘Glenn Masuchika, Chaminade Univ. Lib., Honolulu (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Library Journal Review

As the millennium approaches, one can expect a demand for books relating to the apocalypse. This multivolume set, a masterfully conceived work covering the vast historical literature of apocalypticism, will disappoint the casual reader and utterly delight the serious scholar. Though it focuses narrowly on Judaism and Christianity, with a few articles on Islam and scattered mentionings of Persian, Greek, and Roman folk religions, such limiting was necessary to present this topic in an accessible manner. The three volumes comprise articles written by noted scholars of religious studies and literary criticism. Volume 1, edited by Collins (Univ. of Chicago), covers the beginnings of apocalypticism in the ancient Near East, moves through early Judaism, and ends at the Book of Revelation in the New Testament. Volume 2, edited by McGinn (Univ. of Chicago), begins with the apocalypticism in early Christian theology (100 C.E.) and concludes with discussions of apocalyptic influences in medieval and renaissance literature (up to 1800 C.E.). Of special interest are the articles by Roberto Rusconi on the Antichrist and by Robert E. Lerner on millennialism, both works relevant to anyone interested in biblical Armageddon. Volume 3, edited by Stein (Indiana Univ.), brings the discussion into the 20th century and focuses on the influences of apocalypticism on modern popular culture, art, science, politics, and thought. Although the articles are surprisingly readable for an academic text, the arcane nature of the topic makes casual reading difficult, and only those truly interested in a comprehensive exposition of apocalypticism will find treasures in this great work. There is nothing here for the fans of UFOs, crop circles, or the re-emergence of Atlantis or Mu. Strongly recommended for academic libraries, especially theological ones.‘Glenn Masuchika, Chaminade Univ. Lib., Honolulu (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.