Cover image for A time for treason
Title:
A time for treason
Author:
Walther, Anne N.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
San Francisco : Tapestries Pub., [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
viii, 451 pages ; 25 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780967670300
Format :
Book

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Status
Central Library X Adult Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

A Time for Treason begins in Virginia s Tidewater region on the brink of the American Revolution and climaxes on the island of Bermuda a few months after the battles of Concord and Bunker Hill. Acting as an agent for her influential French constituency, Comtesse Eugenie Devereux must measure the patriots political intent while appearing to be a carefree guest at the Whittingtons elaborate Virginia plantation. Against a backdrop of thoroughbred auctions, a governor s ball in Williamsburg, and an unforgettable night of slaughter and carnage, it is Eugenie s measure that is taken. She flees to Bermuda, where she takes refuge with the Tucker family, determined to complete her mission. The Tucker patriarch is deeply involved in anti-British-government activity and draws Eugenie into his scheme. From the gentle landscape of the Virginia coast to the final moments of the historically significant event at Bermuda s Tobacco Bay, this novel delivers passion, intrigue, and power on a grand scale, along with a hurricane, sailing ships, pirates, privateers, and romance - all set against an actual historical event that was one of the sparks that set off the American Revolution."


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

A historical romance of the first order, Walther's tale of lust and intrigue set on the brink of the American Revolution will delight fans of the genre. The story follows the adventures of Eugenie, a beautiful French noblewoman and also a spy, sent to America by her fellow French noblepersons to gauge the intent and plausibility of the American patriots. When her cover is nearly blown at the Virginia plantation where she is headquartered, Eugenie flees to the island of Bermuda, a British territory, where she gets mixed up in a dangerous plot and other serious anti-British activity. With action that at times is ponderous and slow moving, the book seems to crawl to a climax while our heroine gets into some scrapes, breaks hearts across the colonies, and finally meets her match in devilishly handsome bad boy, Bridger Goodrich. Passion, intrigue, and danger abound in this story based loosely on actual events and real people. --Kathleen Hughes


Publisher's Weekly Review

Nonfiction author Walther (Divorce Hangover) tries her hand at historical fiction with a tepid romance novel set before and during the American Revolution. The plot follows French countess Eug‚nie Devereux as she is sent undercover to the American colonies by "the cartel of France's intellectual aristocracy," to try to determine whether the colonists will fight for independence from Great Britain, and whether Bermuda's citizens will also aid the cause. Eug‚nie has a personal motive: the British killed her parents, and she wants revenge. Walther overdramatizes Eug‚nie's undercover sleuthing, as the information she wants isn't really secret, but like a true spy, Eugenie charms the Whittington family on their Virginia plantation and then goes on to do the same with the Tucker family in Bermuda. All the men she meets fall hopelessly in love with her, but Eug‚nie has eyes only for the British sympathizer and sea pirate Bridger Goodrich, with whom she engages in flowery love talk and has a lukewarm physical relationship. Walther effectively describes the Gunpowder Theft of 1775, in which Eug‚nie helps conspire to steal gunpowder from the Bermudan governor. The author's extensive research is awkwardly evident in long, dry, textbook descriptions of historical events, which are poorly incorporated into the text. Even more annoying is her practice of conveying such information in dialogue, making for stilted and unrealistic conversation. However, Patrick Henry's "Give me liberty, or give me death" speech, brushes with Martha Washington and Thomas Jefferson, and painstaking details of colonial life do add historical color to the novel's overly ambitious scope. 10-city author tour. (June) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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