Cover image for A wrinkle in time
Title:
A wrinkle in time
Author:
L'Engle, Madeleine.
Personal Author:
Edition:
Commemorative edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Bantam Doubleday Dell Books for Young Readers, 1976.

©1962
Physical Description:
198 pages : illustrations ; 18 cm
Summary:
Meg Murry and her friends become involved with unearthly strangers and a search for Meg's father, who has disappeared while engaged in secret work for the government.
General Note:
"Laurel-leaf books."

Edition statement from p. [4] of cover.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
RL: 5.8.

740 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.7 7.0 150.

Reading Counts RC 6-8 5.8 12 Quiz: 12862 Guided reading level: W.
ISBN:
9780440998051

9780606139311
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Item Holds
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Work Room
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Work Room
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Work Room
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Mass Market Paperback Work Room
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Fiction Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Award Winners
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Paperback
Searching...
Searching...
X Juvenile Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Classics
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Award Winners
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Reading List
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Fiction Work Room
Searching...
Searching...
X Young Adult Mass Market Paperback Young Adult
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

This special edition of A Wrinkle in Time iincludes a new essay that explores the science behind the fantasy. Rediscover one of the most beloved children's books of all time: A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle: Meg Murray, her little brother Charles Wallace, and their mother are having a midnight snack on a dark and stormy night when an unearthly stranger appears at their door. He claims to have been blown off course, and goes on to tell them that there is such a thing as a "tesseract," which, if you didn't know, is a wrinkle in time. Meg's father had been experimenting with time-travel when he suddenly disappeared. Will Meg, Charles Wallace, and their friend Calvin outwit the forces of evil as they search through space for their father?


Author Notes

Author Madeleine L'Engle was born in New York City on November 29, 1918. She graduated from Smith College. She is best known for A Wrinkle in Time (1962), which won the 1963 Newbery Medal for best American children's book. While many of her novels blend science fiction and fantasy, she has also written a series of autobiographical books, including Two Part Invention: The Story of a Marriage, which deals with the illness and death of her husband, soap opera actor Hugh Franklin. In 2004, she received a National Humanities Medal from President George W. Bush. She died on September 6, 2007 of natural causes.

Since 1976, Wheaton College in Illinois has maintained a special collection of L'Engle's papers, and a variety of other materials, dating back to 1919.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

*Starred Review* Commemorating its fiftieth anniversary, L'Engle's classic couldn't have scored a better talent to adapt its story into comics form. Larson produces high-quality coming-of-age stories featuring female protagonists, with the most recent (Mercury, 2010) even including a fantasy element to highlight the tale's emotional stakes. She dives wholeheartedly into L'Engle's seminal epic, chronicling the journey of Meg Murry, her preternaturally intelligent younger brother, Charles, and their friend Calvin O'Keefe, crossing distant worlds to save the Murry's, lost patriarch. Guided by three grandmotherly guardian angels, they navigate the dangers of a mind-controlled world fallen under the influence of a cosmic force of pure evil. Larson has miraculously preserved the power of the original's social and religious themes, as well as its compelling emotional core, while staying true to her distinctive voice and aesthetic. Her soft-lined, large-eyed characters are a modern exemplar of classical American cartooning, and the metallic blue coating of the pages evokes both the timelessness of the story and the remoteness of alien worlds. This adaptation is fabulous for presenting a fresh vision to those familiar with the original, but it's so true to the story's soul that even those who've never read it will come away with a genuine understanding of L'Engle's ideas and heart.--Karp, Jesse Copyright 2010 Booklist


Publisher's Weekly Review

L'Engle's Newbery Medal-winning 1962 novel of good, evil, and quantum physics gets a stellar (no pun intended) graphic novel treatment from Eisner-winner Larson (Mercury). Larson's loose, modern drawing style focuses on the characters, largely omitting backgrounds and leaving readers room to add their own imagination. Meg Murry looks every bit as gawky and uncomfortable in her own skin as she feels, and Larson also plays up Charles Wallace's specialness and strangeness, giving him large, haunted eyes that seem to see things his other family members cannot. The b&w art, highlighted with Wedgwood blue, effectively accents the children's sense of alienation, but limits some critical storytelling elements (like a villain's red eyes) after Meg, Charles Wallace, and their neighbor Calvin are whisked across time and space on a mission to rescue Dr. Murry from an evil force that threatens the universe. While fans may miss L'Engle's detailed and evocative prose, her original dialogue, combined with Larson's deft interpretation, will remind them of their first reading, while simultaneously bringing a seminal classic to a new generation. Ages 10-up. Agent: Edward Necarsulmer IV, McIntosh & Otis. (Oct.)? (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5 Up-Generations of readers have treasured this science-fiction classic, so comparisons with the original are inevitable. Larson has remained true to the story, preserving the original chapter format and retaining L'Engle's voice. Black-and-white artwork is accented with blue, echoing the original cover color. Blue shading distinguishes flashbacks. Images of Meg's bruised, expressive face and slouched body shift the focus of the story slightly, making this truly her story, told from her perspective. She is initially portrayed as an "ugly duckling," and her angst and tender feelings are palpable. Larson does an excellent job of building tension. Look for the arrival of Mrs Which, the meeting with IT, and the awe-inspiring approach to Uriel. Imagery of transitions is especially effective. Mrs Whatis's metamorphosis and the dawning of morning after darkness are memorable. Striking black backgrounds with fragmented blue and white outlines perfectly capture tessering sequences. Charles Wallace's demeanor and personality variations are worth noting. Larson's crowning achievement, though, is the noticeable change in Meg's appearance after her encounter with Aunt Beast. Her face and posture portray her maturation and her willingness to not "be afraid to be afraid." However, the expansiveness of travel through time and space seems at odds with the book's trim size. Pages feel somewhat crowded, due to the numerous small panels and relatively dense text. "Playing with time and space is a dangerous game" applies to adapting a literary classic. While some may quibble with specific discrepancies from the original, this book serves as an excellent introduction and companion to a classic children's story.-Barbara M. Moon, Suffolk Cooperative Library System, Bellport, NY (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

From the New Introduction A Stardust Journey with A Wrinkle in Time By Lisa Sonne A Wrinkle in Time was written before any human had walked on the moon or sent rovers to Mars. It was a time before cell phones and personal computers, before digital cameras, CDs, and DVDs, before the fiction of Star Trek, Star Wars, and The Matrix, and before the realities of the space shuttle, the Mir space station, and the International Space Station. Science has changed dramatically as generations of children and adults have read the book since it was first published in 1962. Those scientific advances make Madeleine L'Engle's story even more compelling. The author of A Wrinkle in Time is a tall woman who sometimes wears a purple cape. She will tell you that she is completely made of stardust and always has been. No kidding. " You are made of stardust, too," she will add with a twinkle in her eye. This is not the wild imagination of a creative writer's mind. We are all made of stardust. Our little molecules are the leftovers of big stars that exploded eons ago. Mrs. Whatsit may be a fanciful character who gave up her life as a star to fight the darkness, but we are real creatures who really are made of the cosmic dust of supernovas. When giant stars explode, they send their matter out into the universe and enrich all the yet-to-be-born stars and planets with the chemical ingredients that make up life as we know it. Astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson says, "It's a profound, underappreciated truth." Stardust is just one way that Madeleine L'Engle mixes fact and fantasy to inspire you to want to know more about science. With knowledge come more questions. With imagination comes more curiosity. With searching comes more truth. That blend is a specialty of L'Engle's. Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin visit different planets outside our solar system. When A Wrinkle in Time was first printed in 1962, scientists could confirm the existence of only nine planets-all of them orbiting our sun. Since 1995, astronomers have been finding planets at an average rate of one a month-all outside our solar system. Throughout A Wrinkle in Time, the universe is in a struggle with the Black Thing. L'Engle wrote of the Black Thing before astronomers found black holes, which suck up everything around them, and long before scientists announced that almost all of our universe is composed of invisible "dark matter" and "dark energy," which science knows almost nothing about. In the thin atmosphere of Uriel, Meg has to breathe from a flower to stay alive. In reality, we all breathe plants to stay alive. NASA conducts experiments to see how plants could help keep astronauts alive when they travel in space and live on other planets. In A Wrinkle in Time, we meet thinking aliens in outer space, including Aunt Beast, the Man with Red Eyes, and Mrs. Who. Since 1962, explorers have gone to remote spots on our planet, studying "extremophile" life to learn more about what life out there in space might really be like. Meg, Charles Wallace, and Calvin travel through multiple dimensions. When A Wrinkle in Time first appeared, science recognized only four dimensions-three of space and one of time. Now mathematicians claim that at least nine spatial dimensions are needed to explain our physical world-maybe ten. Maybe more. Just looking at how technology and science have changed since Meg's first adventure was printed is a kind of time travel in your mind that shows how much science and math have grown, and how much they still need to grow. When Meg's father urges her to name the elements of the periodic table to escape the dark forces of IT, she begins reciting, "Hydrogen, Helium, Lithium, Beryllium, Boron, Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, Fluorine . . ." and continues. Only 103 elements were known in 1962. In 2004, to finish reciting the elements on the periodic table, Meg would need to add more tongue-twisters, such as rutherfordium, meitnerium, darmstadtium, and roentgenium (element number 111). New elements are still being discovered, created, and debated. Scientists and astronauts are delving further into the tiny world of microorganisms that Meg's mother studied, and further into the giant realms that Meg's father traveled in. Since 1962, scientists have discovered quarks and quasars, things smaller and bigger than ever known before-smaller than a proton in an atom and larger than a galaxy. What next? "Students can get so bombarded in science classes and think that all is known. It's not. A book like this can help them realize that we know some things, but really very, very little. And maybe a lot of what we know now is not right!" says Shannon Lucid, a science fiction reader and astronaut who has spent more time in space than any other woman. There are still big unanswered questions and great quests yet to begin. For Madeleine L'Engle, every good story and every good life is a search for answers through fiction, fact, and spirit. The poet, the physicist, and the prophet are all searching to understand the dimensions we can't see, whether gravity, time, or love. A Wrinkle in Time is a great journey through dimensions-a journey of exploration and discovery, curiosity and awe. From A Wrinkle In TIme "Now, don't be frightened, loves," Mrs. Whatsit said. Her plump little body began to shimmer, to quiver, to shift. The wild colors of her clothes became muted, whitened. The pudding-bag shape stretched, lengthened, merged. And suddenly before the children was a creature more beautiful than any Meg had even imagined, and the beauty lay in far more than the outward description. Outwardly Mrs. Whatsit was surely no longer a Mrs. Whatsit. She was a marble-white body with powerful flanks, something like a horse but at the same time completely unlike a horse, for from the magnificently modeled back sprang a nobly formed torso, arms, and a head resembling a man's, but a man with a perfection of dignity and virtue, an exaltation of joy such as Meg had never before seen. No, she thought, it's not like a Greek centaur. Not in the least. From the shoulders slowly a pair of wings unfolded, wings made of rainbows, of light upon water, of poetry. Calvin fell to his knees. "No," Mrs. Whatsit said, though her voice was not Mrs. Whatsit's voice. "Not to me, Calvin. Never to me. Stand up." "Ccarrry themm," Mrs. Which commanded. With a gesture both delicate and strong Mrs. Whatsit knelt in front of the children, stretching her wings wide and holding them steady, but quivering. "Onto my back, now," the new voice said. The children took hesitant steps toward the beautiful creature. Excerpted from A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.