Cover image for White Fang
Title:
White Fang
Author:
London, Jack, 1876-1916.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Viking, 1999.

©1998
Physical Description:
237 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 24 cm.
Summary:
The adventures in the northern wilderness of a dog who is part wolf and how he comes to make his peace with man.
General Note:
Complete, unabridged, and annotated with hundreds of extended captions.
Language:
English
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 7.4 13.0 72204.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780670884797

9780670884803
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Newstead Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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East Aurora Library X Adult Fiction Open Shelf
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On Order

Summary

Summary

White Fang was written as the companion book to Jack London's classic 1903 runaway bestseller The Call of the Wild. Seen through the eyes of White Fang -- who is half dog, half wolf -- the story follows the creature as he is forced to endure a series of harsh environments that turn him from his youthful innocence to mad-dog cruelty. That is, until a young man comes along and offers kindness and friendship. But friendship is something that White Fang doesn't understand...yet.

White Fang is more than great storytelling. It is a careful study of the effects of our environments in forming who we are. With fascinating details of the Klondike gold rush and North American Indian life, it is also a remarkable snapshot of its time. With striking illustrations and extended captions unique to the Whole Story, this edition provides background information modern readers could otherwise access only through a broad range of supplemental research. This distinctive approach places White Fang -- first published in 1906 -- within the context of its era, bringing it vividly to life.


Author Notes

One of the pioneers of 20th century American literature, Jack London specialized in tales of adventure inspired by his own experiences.

London was born in San Francisco in 1876. At 14, he quit school and became an "oyster pirate," robbing oyster beds to sell his booty to the bars and restaurants in Oakland. Later, he turned on his pirate associates and joined the local Fish Patrol, resulting in some hair-raising waterfront battles. Other youthful activities included sailing on a seal-hunting ship, traveling the United States as a railroad tramp, a jail term for vagrancy and a hazardous winter in the Klondike during the 1897 gold rush. Those experiences converted him to socialism, as he educated himself through prolific reading and began to write fiction.

After a struggling apprenticeship, London hit literary paydirt by combining memories of his adventures with Darwinian and Spencerian evolutionary theory, the Nietzchean concept of the "superman" and a Kipling-influenced narrative style. "The Son of the Wolf"(1900) was his first popular success, followed by 'The Call of the Wild" (1903), "The Sea-Wolf" (1904) and "White Fang" (1906). He also wrote nonfiction, including reportage of the Russo-Japanese War and Mexican revolution, as well as "The Cruise of the Snark" (1911), an account of an eventful South Pacific sea voyage with his wife, Charmian, and a rather motley crew.

London's body broke down prematurely from his rugged lifestyle and hard drinking, and he died of uremic poisoning - possibly helped along by a morphine overdose - at his California ranch in 1916. Though his massive output is uneven, his best works - particularly "The Call of the Wild" and "White Fang" - have endured because of their rich subject matter and vigorous prose.

(Bowker Author Biography)


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