Cover image for The whipping boy
Title:
The whipping boy
Author:
Fleischman, Sid, 1920-2010.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
[Mahwah, N.J.] : Troll Associates, 1987.

©1986
Physical Description:
90 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
Summary:
A bratty prince and his whipping boy have many adventures when they inadvertently trade places after becoming involved with dangerous outlaws.
General Note:
"A Troll book."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
570 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 3.9 2.0 146.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 4 3 Quiz: 12537 Guided reading level: R.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780816710386
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
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Status
Concord Library X Juvenile Mass Market Paperback Open Shelf
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Lackawanna Library X Juvenile Mass Market Paperback Reading List
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Summary

Summary

Prince Brat decides to run away from home, taking his much-abused whipping boy, Jemmy, with him, but their roles are reversed when the boys are captured by the villians Cut-Water and Hold-Your-Nose-Billy. John Newbery Award, 1987. Outstanding Quality.


Author Notes

Sid Fleischman was born in Brooklyn, New York on March 16, 1920 but grew up in San Diego, California. He loved all things magical and toured professionally as a magician until the beginning of World War II. During the war, he served in the U.S. Naval Reserve, and afterwards, he graduated from San Diego State University in 1949.

After graduation, he worked as a reporter with the San Diego Daily Journal. After the paper folded in 1950, he started writing fiction. He tried his hand at children's books because his own children often wondered what their father did. To show them how he created stories, he wrote them a book. He wrote more than 50 fiction and nonfiction works during his lifetime including The Abracadabra Kid: A Writer's Life; Escape! The Story of the Great Houdini; The Trouble Begins at 8: A Life of Mark Twain in the Wild, Wild West; The Thirteenth Floor; and The Ghost in the Noonday Sun. His book, The Whipping Boy, won the Newberry Award in 1987. He is the father of Newbery Medal winning writer and poet Paul Fleischman; they are the only father and son to receive Newbery awards.

He also wrote screenplays including Lafayette Escadrille, Blood Alley, and The Whipping Boy. He died from cancer on March 17, 2010 at the age of 90.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Gr. 2-5. Jemmy is Prince Brat's whipping boy, but when the spoiled prince decides to run away, it is Jemmy who saves them from a pair of nasty villains.


Publisher's Weekly Review

With his flair for persuading readers to believe in the ridiculous, Fleischman scores a hit with his new creation. Sis's skillful pictures emphasize events in the adventures of the orphan Jemmy, kept in his king's palace to be thrashed for the offenses committed by the royal heir, known as Prince Brat. It is forbidden to punish Brat, whose tricks multiply until Jemmy is tempted to escape the daily round of flogging. But the prince himself takes off and forces the whipping boy to go with him. As they get into and out of trouble on the outside, Jemmy hears that he has been accused of abducting Brat. When the prince arranges for their return to the palace, poor Jemmy fears the worst, but things turn out for the best at the story's satisfying close. Colorful types like a thief called Hold-Your-Nose Billy, Betsy and her dancing bear Petunia, et al., increase the fun. (7-11) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-7 Roles are changed when young Prince Brat, as everyone calls him (he is so altogether rotten that ``Not even black cats would cross his path''), runs away with Jemmy, his whipping boy (the commoner who takes the Prince's punishments). Because Brat has never learned to write and Jemmy can, a couple of prince-nappers decide that Jemmy is the real prince. Chiefly through Jemmy's cleverness, the two escape and return to court. Brat has learned much and changed for the better during his adventures. He winds up calling Jemmy ``friend,'' and he is certain to be a better prince hereafter. This whimsical, readable story delights in the manner of Bill Brittain's books The Wish Giver (1983) and The Devil's Donkey (1981, both Harper). Full-page black-and-white illustrationssomewhat grotesque but always complementaryadd attractiveness to the story. The mistaken identity plot is always a good one: children, even fairly old ones, like disguises and this kind of mix-up. Supplementary characters are well-drawn both by Fleischman and by Sis, so the whole hangs together in basic appeal. Readers could well move from The Whipping Boy to its much longer cousin, Mark Twain's The Prince and the Pauper. George Gleason, Department of English, Southwest Missouri State University, Springfield (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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