Cover image for OFDM for wireless multimedia communications
Title:
OFDM for wireless multimedia communications
Author:
Nee, Richard van.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Boston : Artech House, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xvii, 260 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780890065303
Format :
Book

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Status
Central Library TK5103.2 .N44 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
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Summary

Summary

A study of OFDM, including a comparison with other forms of single carrier modulation methods. It provides the design guidelines needed to maximise benefits from this technology. There is practical advice on how to plan, design and use OFDM to make wireless multimedia communications happen. It offers a solid base for assessing the performance of wireless OFDM systems; explains how OFDM signals are formed using the Inverse Fast Fourier Transform, how the cyclic extension mitigates the effects of modulation, and how windowing can limit out-of-band radiation; discusses the sensitivity of OFDM to synchronization errors; examines the basics of direct sequence and frequency hopping CMDA, helpful in understanding combinations of OFDM and CDMA; explains Multicarrier CDMA, various transmitter architectures, and the pros and cons compared to other CDMA techniques; and includes a discussion of the combination of OFDM and frequency hopping CDMA to get a multiple access system with similar advantages to direct sequence CDMA.


Author Notes

Richard D. J. van Nee received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Delft University, and his M.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from Twente University.

He is a member of the technical staff at Lucent Technologies/Bell Labs in the Netherlands. Dr. van Nee was among those who proposed the OFDM-based physical layer, which was selected for standardization in IEEE 802.11, MMAC, and ETSI HiperLAN.

050


Table of Contents

Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Chapter 1 Introductionp. 1
1.1 Standardization and Frequency Bandsp. 4
1.2 Multimedia Communicationsp. 7
1.2.1 The Need for High Data Ratesp. 8
1.2.2 Services and Applicationsp. 9
1.2.3 Antennas and Batteriesp. 9
1.2.4 Safety Considerationsp. 10
1.2.5 ATM-Based Wireless (Mobile) Broadband Multimedia Systemsp. 12
1.3 Multipath Propagationp. 15
1.3.1 Multipath Channel Modelsp. 16
1.3.2 Delay Spread Valuesp. 17
1.4 Time Variation of the Channelp. 19
1.5 History of OFDMp. 20
1.6 Preview of the Bookp. 24
Referencesp. 25
Chapter 2 OFDM Basicsp. 33
2.1 Introductionp. 33
2.2 Generation of Subcarriers using the IFFTp. 33
2.3 Guard Time and Cyclic Extensionp. 39
2.4 Windowingp. 42
2.5 Choice of OFDM Parametersp. 46
2.6 OFDM Signal Processingp. 47
2.7 Implementation Complexity of OFDM Versus Single Carrier Modulationp. 48
Referencesp. 51
Chapter 3 Coding and Modulationp. 53
3.1 Introductionp. 53
3.2 Forward Error Correction Codingp. 54
3.2.1 Block Codesp. 54
3.2.2 Convolutional Codesp. 55
3.2.3 Concatenated Codesp. 58
3.3 Interleavingp. 59
3.4 Quadrature Amplitude Modulationp. 60
3.5 Coded Modulationp. 62
Referencesp. 70
Chapter 4 Synchronizationp. 73
4.1 Introductionp. 73
4.2 Sensitivity to Phase Noisep. 74
4.3 Sensitivity to Frequency Offsetp. 77
4.4 Sensitivity to Timing Errorsp. 78
4.5 Synchronization using the Cyclic Extensionp. 80
4.6 Synchronization using Special Training Symbolsp. 86
4.7 Optimum Timing in the Presence of Multipatp. 88
Referencesp. 92
Chapter 5 Coherent and Differential Detectionp. 95
5.1 Introductionp. 95
5.2 Coherent Detectionp. 95
5.2.1 Two Dimensional Channel Estimatorsp. 96
5.2.2 One Dimensional Channel Estimatorsp. 103
5.2.3 Special Training Symbolsp. 104
5.2.4 Decision Directed Channel Estimationp. 106
5.3 Differential Detectionp. 107
5.3.1 Differential Detection in the Time Domainp. 107
5.3.2 Differential Detection in the Frequency Domainp. 112
5.3.3 Differential Amplitude and Phase Shift Keyingp. 115
Referencesp. 117
Chapter 6 The Peak Power Problemp. 119
6.1 Introductionp. 119
6.2 Distribution of the Peak-to-Average Power Ratiop. 120
6.3 Clipping and Peak Windowingp. 123
6.3.1 Required Backoff with a Non-Ideal Power Amplifierp. 127
6.3.2 Coding and Scramblingp. 130
6.4 Peak Cancellationp. 131
6.5 PAP Reduction Codesp. 138
6.5.1 Generating Complementary Codesp. 141
6.5.2 Minimum Distance of Complementary Codesp. 144
6.5.3 Maximum Likelihood Decoding of Complementary Codesp. 145
6.5.4 Suboptimum Decoding of Complementary Codesp. 147
6.5.5 Large Code Lengthsp. 150
6.6 SYMBOL Scramblingp. 150
Referencesp. 153
Chapter 7 Basics of CDMAp. 155
7.1 Introductionp. 155
7.2 CDMA: Past, Present, and Futurep. 156
7.3 CDMA Conceptsp. 157
7.3.1 Pure CDMAp. 161
7.4 Basic DS-CDMA Elementsp. 171
7.4.1 RAKE Receiverp. 171
7.4.2 Power Controlp. 172
7.4.3 Soft Handoverp. 173
7.4.4 Interfrequency Handoverp. 175
7.4.5 Multiuser Detectionp. 175
Referencesp. 176
Chapter 8 Multi - Carrier CDMAp. 179
8.1 Introductionp. 179
8.2 Channel Modelp. 180
8.3 DS-CDMA and MC-CDMA Systemsp. 182
8.3.1 DS-CDMA Systemp. 182
8.3.2 MC-CDMA Systemp. 185
8.4 MC-CDMA System Designp. 189
8.5 BEP LOWER Boundp. 194
8.5.1 DS-CDMA Systemp. 194
8.5.2 MC-CDMA Systemp. 195
8.5.3 BEP Lower Bound Equivalencep. 196
8.6 Numerical Resultsp. 197
8.6.1 MC-CDMA System Designp. 197
8.6.2 Down - Link BEP Performancep. 199
8.6.3 Up - Link BER Performancep. 203
8.7 Conclusionsp. 206
Appendix 8Ap. 208
Referencesp. 209
Chapter 9 Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Accessp. 213
9.1 Introductionp. 213
9.2 Frequency Hopping OFDMAp. 213
9.3 Differences between OFDMA and MC-CDMAp. 215
9.4 OFDMA System Descriptionp. 217
9.4.1 Channel Codingp. 220
9.4.2 Modulationp. 220
9.4.3 Time and Frequency Synchronizationp. 221
9.4.4 Initial Modulation Timing Synchronizationp. 221
9.4.5 Initial Frequency Offset Synchronizationp. 222
9.4.6 Synchronization Accuracyp. 222
9.4.7 Power Controlp. 223
9.4.8 Random Frequency Hopping Operationp. 224
9.4.9 Dynamic Channel Allocation (Fast DCA)p. 225
9.4.10 Dynamic Channel Allocation (Simple DCA)p. 227
9.4.11 Capacity of OFDMAp. 227
9.5 Conclusionsp. 227
Referencesp. 228
Chapter 10 Applications of OFDMp. 229
10.1 Introductionp. 229
10.2 Digital Audio Broadcastingp. 229
10.3 Terrestrial Digital Video Broadcastingp. 231
10.4 Magic WANDp. 233
10.4.1 Magic WAND Physical Layerp. 234
10.4.2 Codingp. 236
10.4.3 Simulated Error Probabilitiesp. 236
10.4.4 Effects of Clippingp. 237
10.4.5 Magic WAND Medium Access Control Layerp. 238
10.5 IEEE 802.11, HIPERLAN/2, and MMAC Wireless LAN Standardsp. 241
10.5.1 OFDM Parametersp. 243
10.5.2 Channelizationp. 244
10.5.3 OFDM Signal Processingp. 245
10.5.4 Trainingp. 246
10.5.5 Differences between IEEE 802.11, HIPERLAN/2 and MMACp. 249
10.5.6 Simulation Resultsp. 250
Referencesp. 252
About the Authorsp. 255
Indexp. 257

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