Cover image for American slavery
Title:
American slavery
Author:
Dudley, William, 1964-
Publication Information:
San Diego, Calif. : Greenhaven Press, 2000.
Physical Description:
255 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780737702132

9780737702125
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

In 1860, the southern part of the United States was home to four million African American slaves. Only after a bloody war did America abolish slavery. Authors examine the rise of slavery in the colonies of British North America, how the American Revolution left the new country divided between the free North and the slave South, and how slavery became both a cause and casualty of the Civil War.


Summary

In 1860, the southern part of the United States was home to four million African American slaves. Only after a bloody war did America abolish slavery. Authors examine the rise of slavery in the colonies of British North America, how the American Revolution left the new country divided between the free North and the slave South, and how slavery became both a cause and casualty of the Civil War.


Reviews 2

School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-A clear and well-balanced presentation of a sensitive issue. This excellent volume traces the effects of slavery in the New World and discusses its economic, political, social, and cultural effects on the United States, particularly in the South. Topics like the American Revolution, the Civil War, and Reconstruction are discussed within the context of slavery. Each chapter begins with a valuable summary, and discussion questions appear at the end. The extensive appendix contains reprints of 20 historical documents including early Virginia runaway-slave laws, the Emancipation Proclamation, and an excerpt from a 1693 Quaker antislavery pamphlet. A few black-and-white illustrations and photographs appear throughout. The concise, informative text is enlivened by documented quotes from slaves. Issues raised in this book make it particularly useful for debaters.-Daniel Mungai, Queens Borough Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


School Library Journal Review

Gr 10 Up-A clear and well-balanced presentation of a sensitive issue. This excellent volume traces the effects of slavery in the New World and discusses its economic, political, social, and cultural effects on the United States, particularly in the South. Topics like the American Revolution, the Civil War, and Reconstruction are discussed within the context of slavery. Each chapter begins with a valuable summary, and discussion questions appear at the end. The extensive appendix contains reprints of 20 historical documents including early Virginia runaway-slave laws, the Emancipation Proclamation, and an excerpt from a 1693 Quaker antislavery pamphlet. A few black-and-white illustrations and photographs appear throughout. The concise, informative text is enlivened by documented quotes from slaves. Issues raised in this book make it particularly useful for debaters.-Daniel Mungai, Queens Borough Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Daniel C. LittlefieldJohn B. BolesDonald R. WrightPeter KolchinGary B. NashRoger L. RansomNathaniel Weyl and William MarinaWilliam W. FreehlingRonald TakakiJames OakesJohn Hope Franklin and Albert A. Moss Jr.Merton L. DillonJames M. McPhersonLeon F. LitwackDavid W. BlightJeffrey Rogers HummelRobert W. FogelDaniel C. LittlefieldJohn B. BolesDonald R. WrightPeter KolchinGary B. NashRoger L. RansomNathaniel Weyl and William MarinaWilliam W. FreehlingRonald TakakiJames OakesJohn Hope Franklin and Albert A. Moss Jr.Merton L. DillonJames M. McPhersonLeon F. LitwackDavid W. BlightJeffrey Rogers HummelRobert W. Fogel
Forewordp. 9
Introductionp. 11
The Rise and Fall of American Slavery: A Brief Overviewp. 14
Chapter 1 Origins of American Slavery
1. The Atlantic Slave Tradep. 34
2. Establishing Slavery in the Southern Coloniesp. 44
3. Slavery in the Northern Coloniesp. 58
Chapter 2 Slavery and the American Revolution
1. American Slavery: The American Revolution (The Demise of Slavery in the North)p. 68
2. The Failure of Gradual Emancipation in the Southp. 74
Chapter 3 A House Divided: American Slavery in the Antebellum Era
1. The Missouri Compromise of 1820p. 83
2. John C. Calhoun and the Southern Defense of Slaveryp. 92
3. The Abolitionist Movement Provokes the Southp. 103
4. Social Tensions Within Southern Plantation Societyp. 113
5. Fugitive Slaves Exacerbate the Sectional Crisis over Slaveryp. 121
6. Slavery and Sectional Tensions in the 1850sp. 128
Chapter 4 Civil War and the End of American Slavery
1. Slaves Seek Freedom in the Civil Warp. 137
2. Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamationp. 148
3. How Slaves Responded to Their Emancipationp. 157
4. Reconstruction: The Aftermath of Emancipation and Civil Warp. 171
Chapter 5 Was the Civil War Necessary to End Slavery?
1. War Was Not Necessary to End American Slaveryp. 180
2. The Significance of America's Civil War and Abolition of Slavery in World Historyp. 185
Discussion Questionsp. 194
Appendix of Documentsp. 197
Chronologyp. 238
For Further Researchp. 243
Indexp. 248
Forewordp. 9
Introductionp. 11
The Rise and Fall of American Slavery: A Brief Overviewp. 14
Chapter 1 Origins of American Slavery
1. The Atlantic Slave Tradep. 34
2. Establishing Slavery in the Southern Coloniesp. 44
3. Slavery in the Northern Coloniesp. 58
Chapter 2 Slavery and the American Revolution
1. American Slavery: The American Revolution (The Demise of Slavery in the North)p. 68
2. The Failure of Gradual Emancipation in the Southp. 74
Chapter 3 A House Divided: American Slavery in the Antebellum Era
1. The Missouri Compromise of 1820p. 83
2. John C. Calhoun and the Southern Defense of Slaveryp. 92
3. The Abolitionist Movement Provokes the Southp. 103
4. Social Tensions Within Southern Plantation Societyp. 113
5. Fugitive Slaves Exacerbate the Sectional Crisis over Slaveryp. 121
6. Slavery and Sectional Tensions in the 1850sp. 128
Chapter 4 Civil War and the End of American Slavery
1. Slaves Seek Freedom in the Civil Warp. 137
2. Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamationp. 148
3. How Slaves Responded to Their Emancipationp. 157
4. Reconstruction: The Aftermath of Emancipation and Civil Warp. 171
Chapter 5 Was the Civil War Necessary to End Slavery?
1. War Was Not Necessary to End American Slaveryp. 180
2. The Significance of America's Civil War and Abolition of Slavery in World Historyp. 185
Discussion Questionsp. 194
Appendix of Documentsp. 197
Chronologyp. 238
For Further Researchp. 243
Indexp. 248

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