Cover image for On the far side of the mountain
Title:
On the far side of the mountain
Author:
George, Jean Craighead, 1919-2012.
Publication Information:
Markham, Ont. : Puffin, 1991.

©1990
Physical Description:
170 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
General Note:
Sequel to: My side of the mountain.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
760 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 4.5 6.0 630.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.8 8 Quiz: 08621 Guided reading level: V.
ISBN:
9780140342482
Format :
Book

Available:*

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Material Type
Home Location
Status
Concord Library FICTION Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

Sam's peaceful existence in his wilderness home is disrupted when his sister runs away and his pet falcon is confiscated by a conservation officer.


Author Notes

Jean Craighead George was born on July 2, 1919 in Washington, D.C. She received degrees in English and science from Pennsylvania State University. She began her career as a reporter for the International News Service. In the 1940s she was a member of the White House press corps for The Washington Post.

During her lifetime, she wrote over 100 novels including My Side of the Mountain, which was a 1960 Newbery Honor Book, On the Far Side of the Mountain, Julie of the Wolves, which won the Newbery Medal, Julie, and Julie's Wolf Pack. She also wrote two guides to cooking with wild foods and an autobiography entitled Journey Inward. In 1991, she became the first winner of the School Library Media Section of the New York Library Association's Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature. She died on May 15, 2012 at the age of 92.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Fans of My Side of the Mountain will be delighted to find that Sam Gribley still lives in a hollow tree with Frightful, his faithful falcon. Sam has neighbors now: his sister Alice lives in a nearby treehouse and his old friend Bando has bought a nearby cabin. Sam's summer plans are disrupted when a conservation officer accuses him of harboring an endangered species and confiscates Frightful. Sam is so devastated by the loss of his companion that several days pass before he realizes that Alice has left home. Setting out to track his sister down, Sam crosses paths with a band of falcon smugglers and is given the chance to take back Frightful for his own. Faced with a difficult decision, Sam chooses wisely and the story ends on a satisfying note, full of hope for the future. Since nature has become chic in the years since Sam's first adventures were published, sophisticated readers will enjoy the author's wry references to the new fashion for Adirondack furniture and her description of an eatery that specializes in gourmet wild foods. Filled with accurate details (it is possible to trace Sam's journey on a map), likeable characters and plenty of backwoods lore, this sequel is worthy of its predecessor. Ages 8-12. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-- More than 30 years later, the story of Sam Gribley is resumed shortly after it ended in My Side of the Mountain (Dutton, 1988) . When Frightful, the falcon, is confiscated and Sam's sister Alice disappears, Sam and his friend Bando look for her. In their search, they uncover a ring of illegal falcon dealers and come to terms with their limits and responsibilities as individual humans within the larger society of all mountain dwellers. Using a straightforward, first-person narrative and journal entries, George effectively evokes the natural setting with which she is obviously familiar. She also takes great care to describe the devices Sam and Alice construct to make their serene yet rugged life easier. These contraptions are complicated, but are clarified by black-and-white sketches. Sam remains the focus of the novel, but characters are abundant in contrast to his earlier solitary lifestyle. Unfortunately, they play mainly as a catalyst for Sam's actions and development. While their presence injects a note of reality, it also underscores the incredibility of the story, for the more contact Sam has with civilization, the more remarkable his living situation becomes. The plot is considerably more complicated than in the first book, and current issues are raised, but the timelessness of theme and setting is carried over from the original. The contrivance of the black-market bird dealer may serve as a device to engage readers' interest, but the strength of the story lies in Sam's personal observations and growth. This volume can be enjoyed without the background laid in the first book, and it will inspire many readers to investigate the beginning of Sam's story. --Starr LaTronica, North Berkeley Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

A Storm Breaksp. 1
The Population Shrinksp. 11
I Start Overp. 22
A Trade Comes My Wayp. 33
I Go Backwards in Order to Go Forwardsp. 41
I Am in for a Surprisep. 53
I Am Sent East by Northeastp. 63
Zella Makes Sensep. 70
I Learn to Think Like a Pigp. 81
Bando Finds Some Old Adirondack Furniturep. 91
I Become Royaltyp. 101
I Get News of Alicep. 111
The Dawn Breaks over Mep. 121
I Am On the Trackp. 136
A Bird Talks to Mep. 152

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