Cover image for Lost horizon
Title:
Lost horizon
Author:
Hilton, James, 1900-1954.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
Cutchogue, N.Y. : Buccaneer Books, 1933.
Physical Description:
217 pages ; 23 cm
General Note:
Reprinted by arrangement with William Morrow and Co., Inc.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780899664507
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

Four people are transported to the dream-like world of Shangri-La where life is eternal and civilization refined.


Author Notes

James Hilton was born in Leigh, Lancashire, England on September 9, 1900. While attending the Leys School in Cambridge, he published several stories in the school magazine. In 1918, he won a scholarship to Christ's College, Cambridge, where he joined the University Officer Training Squadron. Before he saw any action, the war ended. He published his first novel, Catherine Herself, in 1920, while still an undergraduate.

After Cambridge, he became a freelance journalist, writing chiefly for The Manchester Guardian and later The Irish Independent and reviewing fiction for The Daily Telegraph. During this time, he had several more of his novels published, though without conspicuous success. In 1931, he enjoyed his first popular success with And Now Goodbye and was able to take up writing fiction full time. His other works include Lost Horizon, which won the Hawthornden Prize, Goodbye Mr. Chips, and Random Harvest, all of which were made into highly successful motion pictures.

In 1935, he was invited to Hollywood to work as a screenwriter. He wrote screenplays for Camille, Foreign Correspondent, Forever and a Day, The Story of Dr. Wassell, The Tuttles of Tahiti, and We Are Not Alone. He won the Best Screenplay Oscar for Mrs. Miniver in 1942. During his Hollywood years, he continued to write novels including Nothing So Strange, Morning Journey, and Time and Time Again. He also served as the narrator for Madame Curie and the adaptation of his novel So Well Remembered, in addition to hosting CBS Radio's Hallmark Playhouse from 1948 until 1953. He died of liver cancer on December 20, 1954.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Excerpts

Excerpts

Lost Horizon A Novel Chapter One During that third week of May the situation in Baskul had become much worse and, on the 20th, Air Force machines arrived by arrangement from Peshawar to evacuate the white residents. These numbered about eighty, and most were safely transported across the mountains in troop-carriers. A few miscellaneous aircraft were also employed, among them being a cabin machine lent by the Maharajah of Chandapore. In this, about 10 A.M. , four passengers embarked: Miss Roberta Brinklow, of the Eastern Mission; Henry D. Barnard, an American; Hugh Conway, H.M. Consul; and Captain Charles Mallinson, H.M. Vice-Consul. These names are as they appeared later in Indian and British newspapers. Conway was thirty-seven. He had been at Baskul for two years, in a job which now, in the light of events, could be regarded as a persistent backing oft he wrong horse. A stage of his life was finished; in a few weeks' time, or perhaps after a few months' leave in England, he would be sent somewhere else. Tokyo or Teheran, Manila or Muscat; people in his profession never knew what was coming. He had been ten years in the Consular Service, long enough to assess his own chances as shrewdly as he was apt to do those of others. He knew that the plums were not for him; but it was genuinely consoling, and not merely sour grapes, to reflect that he had no taste for plums. He preferred the less formal and more picturesque jobs that were on offer, and as these were often not good ones, it had doubtless seemed to others that he was playing his cards rather badly. Actually, he felt he had played them rather well; he had had a varied and moderately enjoyable decade. He was tall, deeply bronzed, with brown short cropped hair and slate-blue eyes. He was inclined to look severe and brooding until he laughed, and then (but it happened not so very often) he looked boyish. There was a slight nervous twitch near the left eye which was usually noticeable when he worked too hard or drank too much, and as he had been packing and destroying documents throughout the whole of the day and night preceding the evacuation, the twitch was very conspicuous when he climbed into the aeroplane. He was tired out, and overwhelmingly glad that he had contrived to be sent in the maharajah's luxurious air liner instead of in one of the crowded troop-carriers. He spread himself indulgently in the basket seat as the plane soared aloft. He was the sort of man who, being used to major hardships, expected minor comforts by way of compensation. Cheerfully he might endure the rigors of the road to Samarkand, but from London to Paris he would spend his last tenner on the Golden Arrow. It was after the flight had lasted more than an hour that Mallinson said he thought the pilot wasn't keeping a straight course. Mallinson sat immediately in front. He was a youngster in his middle twenties, pink-cheeked, intelligent without being intellectual, beset with public school limitations, but also with their excellences. Failure to pass an examination was the chief cause of his being sent to Baskul, where Conway had had six months of his company and had grown to like him. But Conway did not want to make the effort that an aeroplane conversation demands. He opened his eyes drowsily and replied that whatever the course taken, the pilot presumably knew best. Half an hour later, when weariness and the drone of the engine had lulled him nearly to sleep, Mallinson disturbed him again. "I say, Conway, I thought Fenner was piloting us?" "Well, isn't he?" "The chap turned his head just now and I'll swear it wasn't he." "It's hard to tell, through that glass panel." "I'd know Fenner's face anywhere." "Well, then, it must be some one else. I don't see that it matters." "But Fenner told me definitely that he was taking this machine." "They must have changed their minds and given him one of the others." "Well, who is this man, then?" "My dear boy, how should I know? You don't suppose I've memorized the face of every flight-lieutenant in the Air Force, do you?" "I know a good many of them, anyway, but I don't recognize this fellow." "Then he must belong to the minority whom you don't know." Conway smiled and added: "When we arrive in Peshawar very soon you can make his acquaintance and ask him all about himself." "At this rate we shan't get to Peshawar at all. The man's right off his course. And I'm not surprised, either -- flying so damned high he can't see where he is." Conway was not bothering. He was used to air travel, and took things for granted. Besides, there was nothing particular he was eager to do when he got to Peshawar, and no one particular he was eager to see; so it was a matter of complete indifference to him whether the journey took four hours or six. He was unmarried; there would be no tender greetings on arrival. He had friends, and a few of them would probably take him to the club and stand him drinks; it was a pleasant prospect, but not one to sigh for in anticipation. Nor did he sigh retrospectively, when he viewed the equally pleasant, but not wholly satisfying vista of the past decade. Changeable, fair intervals, becoming rather unsettled; it had been his own meteorological summary during that time, as well as the world's. He thought of Baskul, Pekin, Macao, and other places -- he had moved about pretty often. Remotest of all was Oxford, where he had had a couple of years of donhood after the War, lecturing on Oriental History, breathing dust in sunny libraries, cruising down the High on a push-bicycle. The vision attracted, but did not stir him; there was a sense in which he felt that he was still a part of all that he might have been ... Lost Horizon A Novel . Copyright © by James Hilton. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold. Excerpted from Lost Horizon by James Hilton All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.