Cover image for After the fire a novel
Title:
After the fire a novel
Author:
Plain, Belva.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Bantam Doubleday Dell Audio Publishing , [2000]

℗2000
Physical Description:
5 audio discs (approximately 5 hrs.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
General Note:
Abridged.

Compact discs.
Language:
English
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780553456714
Format :
Audiobook on CD

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Dudley Branch Library X DISC 5 Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Audubon Library BOCD #50 DISC 5 Adult Audiobook on CD Audiobooks
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Summary

Summary

 

In this sweeping interpretive history of mid-nineteenth-century Chicago, historians John B. Jentz and Richard Schneirov boldly trace the evolution of a modern social order. Combining a mastery of historical and political detail with a sophisticated theoretical frame, Jentz and Schneirov examine the dramatic capitalist transition in Chicago during the critical decades from the 1850s through the 1870s, a period that saw the rise of a permanent wage worker class and the formation of an industrial upper class.   Jentz and Schneirov demonstrate how a new political economy, based on wage labor and capital accumulation in manufacturing, superseded an older mercantile economy that relied on speculative trading and artisan production. The city's leading business interests were unable to stabilize their new system without the participation of the new working class, a German and Irish ethnic mix that included radical ideas transplanted from Europe. Jentz and Schneirov examine how debates over slave labor were transformed into debates over free labor as the city's wage-earning working class developed a distinctive culture and politics.   The new social movements that arose in this era--labor, socialism, urban populism, businessmen's municipal reform, Protestant revivalism, and women's activism--constituted the substance of a new post-bellum democratic politics that took shape in the 1860s and '70s. When the Depression of 1873 brought increased crime and financial panic, Chicago's new upper class developed municipal reform in an attempt to reassert its leadership. Setting local detail against a national canvas of partisan ideology and the seismic structural shifts of Reconstruction, Chicago in the Age of Capital vividly depicts the upheavals integral to building capitalism.

 


Author Notes

Belva Plain lives in northern New Jersey. She is the author of the bestselling novels "Evergreen", "Random Winds", "Eden Burning", "Crescent City", "The Golden Cup", "Tapestry", "Blessings", "Harvest", "Treasures", "Whispers", "Daybreak", "The Carousel", "Promises", "Secrecy", "Homecoming", "Legacy of Silence", "Fortune's Hand", and "After the Fire".

(Publisher Provided) Belva Plain was born in New York City on October 9, 1915. She received a degree in history from Barnard College in 1939. Her first short story was published in Cosmopolitan when she was 25 years old, and she continued to write for the publication for years. Her first novel, Evergreen (1978), was on the New York Times bestseller list for 41 weeks and was made into a television miniseries. Her other works include Crescent City, Promises, Blessings, The Carousel, Daybreak, and After the Fire. She died on October 12, 2010 at the age of 95.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

This New York Times best-selling author gives us another story of family and fortune, beauty and betrayal. --Brad Hooper


Library Journal Review

When young artist Hyacinth falls in love with and marries Gerald, a medical student, she thinks she has found heaven. But like many marriages, this one founders. Then one night in desperation Hyacinth commits an act for which she will pay dearly, giving Gerald the reason he needs to gain uncontested custody of their two young children. However, despite the anguish over her children and her broken marriage, Hyacinth takes a fashion design course and quickly rises to the top of her profession. Although known and admired for her portrayals of families in all their complexity, Plain's (Legacy of Silence) characters in this book fail to be convincing. The combination of Hyacinth's na?vet? and meteoric assent in the fashion business strains believability. The author's strength, however, lies in her ability to sustain suspense throughout the story, leaving listeners wondering about "the secret" until the end. Kate Harper reads with skill and emotion, rendering both male and female voices effectively. The tape quality is excellent. Recommended for popular fiction collections. Nancy R. Ives, SUNY at Geneseo (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Excerpts

Excerpts

Solid in status, circled by wide lawns and lavish shrubbery, the house stood where the outer suburbs met the countryside and the road wound toward the Berkshire hills. The land rose in ripples. In the morning the rising sun washed the hilltops in hazy pink light; at day's end the afterglow, lingering above them, lay like a scarlet stripe between the dark land and a foaming gray sea of clouds. On such an evening, Hyacinth put aside the sketches and charcoal on her desk to gaze with pleasure at the scene. Except for the faintest rustle of leaves in the warm September air, it was quite still. And at the open window, she too stood quite still, in awe of the evening. A mood, one of those that in occasional self-mockery she called her "poetic moments," had overcome her. Yet the mood ought not to be mocked, especially now when she was so incredibly happy. So secure, contented, and loved -- so incredibly happy! Abruptly then, she heard voices. Her parents, following their custom, were sitting on the open porch below. She had never eavesdropped and was certainly not about to do so now. But she had heard her name. "Hy is twenty-one," Dad said. "She's not a child anymore." "Hyacinth is twenty-one going on twelve." "You amaze me, Francine. Here's a girl, an A student, only one year out of college, and already interning in one of the finest museums in the country. And," he went on, in the proud, earnest tone that a father assumes when he is boasting about an only daughter, "she's an artist! She'll make a name for herself. Wait and see." "I'm not talking about academics. I'm talking about emotions. Haven't you noticed how she walks around with a smile all the time? I wouldn't be surprised if she was already planning a wedding. Oh, I'd like to ship that fellow to Australia, or Tierra del Fuego, or anyplace." Hy pulled the desk chair to the window and sat there dumbfounded. "What have you really got against him, Francine? All right, so you haven't been enthusiastic about him, and that's your privilege, but why so vehement? Why?" "He'll break her heart, Jim, that's why. Gerald's a chaser. I see it. I feel it in my bones. Right now he's struggling to get ahead, but once there, he'll drop her. I don't trust him. He'll chase after women, and women will chase after him. He's too gorgeous. He ought to be in Hollywood. Hyacinth's no match for that kind of business." "For God's sake, your imagination is running away with you. He's certainly faithful enough. Three times every week, plus every weekend." "I don't say he can't be sincere at the moment. It's possible, after a fashion. She certainly has qualities that you don't find everywhere you look. Deep intelligence. Taste. Dignity. And she so obviously adores him. That flatters a man." "I still say you're making a mountain out of a molehill." "Jim! I'm talking about humiliation. I'm talking about heartbreak. He's not for her. He's not!" Hyacinth's heart hammered in her ears. Not for me? What do you know about him, or about me, either? You know nothing about my life. "She's so good, Jim. A genuinely good human being." "Yes, yes, that she is." As clearly as if she had been sitting down there on the porch with them, Hyacinth saw their faces: her father's pale eyes, so much like her own, reflective, looking off into the distance; her mother's darting eyes, bright and blue, with the two vertical lines between them that appeared whenever she was alert or emphatic. "I don't see it at all, Francine. He's agreeable, well mannered, smart, medical school, medical honorary society. Pretty desirable, if you ask me. And the fact is, I rather like him." "Yes, he's likable enough. But I tell you again, he's too shrewd for her. She's a total innocent. What does she know about the world? Or about people? The only men she's gone out with are college boys and maybe a couple of artists she's met at her job. And not even many of them. Gerald's taken up practically all of this year." The best year of my life. The year that's changed my life. "She's a typical artist, a student, a loner, and always has been." "A lot of people are artists and students and loners. A lot of remarkable people." "Yes, and they are often the ones who get hurt the most." "Well, if you feel this way, why don't you talk to her about it?" "Talk to her? For all her sweetness, she can still be stubborn as a mule when she wants to be, can't she? Do I have to tell you? How long have we been asking her to stop smoking? And has she stopped? It's odd, too. She doesn't look like the type to go around with a cigarette in her hand." Should she run downstairs now and confront them with her outrage? But she sat there, unable to move, and waited for more. Dad spoke quietly. "You're getting yourself all worked up." "What shall I do? Sit calmly watching a man get what he can out of my child?" "What do you mean by 'get what he can'? Sex?" "Who knows? But there are other things besides sex." Dad persisted. "Such as?" "Look around. What's bad about this house? Pretty comfortable here, isn't it? He noticed things, too, the few times he was here. He kept looking around. I saw him." "Well, why wouldn't he be curious? It's only natural. He's lived poor all his life, and he's up to his ears in debt to the university. It's not like you to be so critical. It's not like you to be cynical." There was a sigh in Dad's voice. He hated argument. "Not cynical. Realistic." "Let's go inside. The mosquitoes are out." But Francine was not finished. "Don't be misled by Hy's brains or her energy or her ambition. At heart, she's a bookworm. Give her a book or a new CD, and she's happy. Her wants are simple. She's simple. And that fellow isn't. They don't even like the same things." Dad laughed. "How much chemistry did you know or like when you married me?" "That was different. You were Mr. Honorable, Mr. Salt-of-the-Earth. And you still are," Francine said softly. She gave a small, rueful laugh. "She's soft, like you. Not like me, Jim." "Well, we've been a great combination anyway, haven't we? Come on in with me. This is a big, useless fuss about nothing. Believe me. And even if it were as serious as you say, there wouldn't be anything we could do about it." From the Paperback edition. Excerpted from After the Fire by Belva Plain All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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