Cover image for Dogs don't tell jokes
Title:
Dogs don't tell jokes
Author:
Sachar, Louis, 1954-
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Knopf paperback edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Knopf, 1997.

©1991
Physical Description:
209 pages ; 20 cm
Summary:
Twelve-year-old Gary, known as Goon because of his constant clowning and joke-telling, tries to change his image and make new friends at school.
Language:
English
Reading Level:
560 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR MG 3.8 5.0 18761.

Reading Counts RC 3-5 5.1 6 Quiz: 03194 Guided reading level: O.
ISBN:
9780679820178

9780679920175

9780679833727
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
East Aurora Library X Juvenile Fiction Open Shelf
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Summary

Summary

GARY W. BOONE knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It's the rest of the kids in his class who think he's just a goon. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and Gary's sure this will be his big break.


Summary

GARY W. BOONE knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It's the rest of the kids in his class who think he's just a goon. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and Gary's sure this will be his big break.


Summary

A sidesplitting classic from Newbery Medalist and National Book Award winner Louis Sachar ( Holes ), with a brand-new cover!
 
Gary W. Boone knows he was born to be a stand-up comedian. It's the rest of the kids in his class who think he's just a goon. Then the Floyd Hicks Junior High School Talent Show is announced, and he starts practicing his routine nonstop to get it just right. Gary's sure this will be his big break--he'll make everyone laugh and win the $100 prize. But when an outrageous surprise threatens to turn his debut into a disaster, it looks as if the biggest joke of all may be on Gary himself.


Author Notes

Louis Sachar was born in East Meadow, New York on March 20, 1954. He attended the University of California, at Berkeley. During his senior year, he helped out at Hillside Elementary School. It was his experience there that led to his first book, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, written in 1976. After college, he worked for a while in a sweater warehouse in Norwalk, Connecticut before attending Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, where he graduated in 1980. Sideways Stories from Wayside School was accepted for publication during his first week of law school. He worked part-time as a lawyer for eight years before becoming a full-time writer in 1989. His other works include There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom, the Marvin Redpost books, Fuzzy Mud, and Holes, which won the 1999 Newbery Medal, the National Book Award, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and was made into a major motion picture.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Louis Sachar was born in East Meadow, New York on March 20, 1954. He attended the University of California, at Berkeley. During his senior year, he helped out at Hillside Elementary School. It was his experience there that led to his first book, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, written in 1976. After college, he worked for a while in a sweater warehouse in Norwalk, Connecticut before attending Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, where he graduated in 1980. Sideways Stories from Wayside School was accepted for publication during his first week of law school. He worked part-time as a lawyer for eight years before becoming a full-time writer in 1989. His other works include There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom, the Marvin Redpost books, Fuzzy Mud, and Holes, which won the 1999 Newbery Medal, the National Book Award, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and was made into a major motion picture.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Louis Sachar was born in East Meadow, New York on March 20, 1954. He attended the University of California, at Berkeley. During his senior year, he helped out at Hillside Elementary School. It was his experience there that led to his first book, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, written in 1976. After college, he worked for a while in a sweater warehouse in Norwalk, Connecticut before attending Hastings College of the Law in San Francisco, where he graduated in 1980. Sideways Stories from Wayside School was accepted for publication during his first week of law school. He worked part-time as a lawyer for eight years before becoming a full-time writer in 1989. His other works include There's a Boy in the Girls' Bathroom, the Marvin Redpost books, Fuzzy Mud, and Holes, which won the 1999 Newbery Medal, the National Book Award, and the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award and was made into a major motion picture.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 9

Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. Seventh-grader Gary "Goon" Boone tells jokes constantly and seems unable to take anything seriously. He thinks he's funny; his peers don't. They just think he's a dweeb. Hearing about a school talent contest, Boone signs up, sure that his performance will be the first step toward realizing his desire to be a stand-up comic. But as the contest nears, he becomes aware of his nerdy reputation, and, trying to be "normal," drops out of the talent show and starts playing football and collecting baseball cards. Unfortunately, he's more miserable than before, so he signs up for the contest again, determined to prove himself in the way he knows best. Sachar gets Gary's emotions right in a story that deals with popularity, athletic skill, stage fright, and even parental pop psychology. Readers will laugh at Gary's good jokes and groan at his clunkers while they cheer his transformation from goon to legitimate comedian. ~--Randy Meyer


Publisher's Weekly Review

PW praised the ``strong, realistic characterization'' in this ``gracefully told story'' of a compulsive comic, the scourge of his seventh-grade class. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-- Gary Boone (who calls himself ``Goon'') is the self-proclaimed clown of his seventh-grade class. He never stops joking, despite the fact that nobody laughs much, and he has no real friends at school. Entering a talent contest as a stand-up comedian forces him to look more closely at the effect his humor has on others and on himself. Sachar balances the fun with moments of insight and feeling. Gary, who appeared as a fifth grader in Someday Angeline (McKay, 1990), is not very funny as the book begins. He has moments of true wit, but they are overshadowed as he reels off one-liners culled from books. As he begins to notice how his family and classmates react to his jokes, he gradually becomes funnier. He also stops falling back on the self-deprecating humor that has helped to make him unpopular . His hilarious performance at the talent show is a fitting climax, full of real surprises. Hurwitz's Class Clown (Morrow, 1987) deals with a similar theme but is for a younger audience. Dogs Don't Tell Jokes is an excellent choice for junior high readers, and Sachar's younger fans will enjoy it too. --Steven Engelfried, Pleasanton Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. Seventh-grader Gary "Goon" Boone tells jokes constantly and seems unable to take anything seriously. He thinks he's funny; his peers don't. They just think he's a dweeb. Hearing about a school talent contest, Boone signs up, sure that his performance will be the first step toward realizing his desire to be a stand-up comic. But as the contest nears, he becomes aware of his nerdy reputation, and, trying to be "normal," drops out of the talent show and starts playing football and collecting baseball cards. Unfortunately, he's more miserable than before, so he signs up for the contest again, determined to prove himself in the way he knows best. Sachar gets Gary's emotions right in a story that deals with popularity, athletic skill, stage fright, and even parental pop psychology. Readers will laugh at Gary's good jokes and groan at his clunkers while they cheer his transformation from goon to legitimate comedian. ~--Randy Meyer


Publisher's Weekly Review

PW praised the ``strong, realistic characterization'' in this ``gracefully told story'' of a compulsive comic, the scourge of his seventh-grade class. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-- Gary Boone (who calls himself ``Goon'') is the self-proclaimed clown of his seventh-grade class. He never stops joking, despite the fact that nobody laughs much, and he has no real friends at school. Entering a talent contest as a stand-up comedian forces him to look more closely at the effect his humor has on others and on himself. Sachar balances the fun with moments of insight and feeling. Gary, who appeared as a fifth grader in Someday Angeline (McKay, 1990), is not very funny as the book begins. He has moments of true wit, but they are overshadowed as he reels off one-liners culled from books. As he begins to notice how his family and classmates react to his jokes, he gradually becomes funnier. He also stops falling back on the self-deprecating humor that has helped to make him unpopular . His hilarious performance at the talent show is a fitting climax, full of real surprises. Hurwitz's Class Clown (Morrow, 1987) deals with a similar theme but is for a younger audience. Dogs Don't Tell Jokes is an excellent choice for junior high readers, and Sachar's younger fans will enjoy it too. --Steven Engelfried, Pleasanton Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Booklist Review

Gr. 5-7. Seventh-grader Gary "Goon" Boone tells jokes constantly and seems unable to take anything seriously. He thinks he's funny; his peers don't. They just think he's a dweeb. Hearing about a school talent contest, Boone signs up, sure that his performance will be the first step toward realizing his desire to be a stand-up comic. But as the contest nears, he becomes aware of his nerdy reputation, and, trying to be "normal," drops out of the talent show and starts playing football and collecting baseball cards. Unfortunately, he's more miserable than before, so he signs up for the contest again, determined to prove himself in the way he knows best. Sachar gets Gary's emotions right in a story that deals with popularity, athletic skill, stage fright, and even parental pop psychology. Readers will laugh at Gary's good jokes and groan at his clunkers while they cheer his transformation from goon to legitimate comedian. ~--Randy Meyer


Publisher's Weekly Review

PW praised the ``strong, realistic characterization'' in this ``gracefully told story'' of a compulsive comic, the scourge of his seventh-grade class. Ages 8-12. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

Gr 5-8-- Gary Boone (who calls himself ``Goon'') is the self-proclaimed clown of his seventh-grade class. He never stops joking, despite the fact that nobody laughs much, and he has no real friends at school. Entering a talent contest as a stand-up comedian forces him to look more closely at the effect his humor has on others and on himself. Sachar balances the fun with moments of insight and feeling. Gary, who appeared as a fifth grader in Someday Angeline (McKay, 1990), is not very funny as the book begins. He has moments of true wit, but they are overshadowed as he reels off one-liners culled from books. As he begins to notice how his family and classmates react to his jokes, he gradually becomes funnier. He also stops falling back on the self-deprecating humor that has helped to make him unpopular . His hilarious performance at the talent show is a fitting climax, full of real surprises. Hurwitz's Class Clown (Morrow, 1987) deals with a similar theme but is for a younger audience. Dogs Don't Tell Jokes is an excellent choice for junior high readers, and Sachar's younger fans will enjoy it too. --Steven Engelfried, Pleasanton Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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