Cover image for Neurosis and human growth : the struggle toward self-realization
Title:
Neurosis and human growth : the struggle toward self-realization
Author:
Horney, Karen, 1885-1952.
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Norton, [1991]

©1991
Physical Description:
391 pages ; 21 cm
General Note:
"Reissued with a new foreword 1991"--T.p. verso.
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780393307757
Format :
Book

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RC530 .H73 1991 Adult Non-Fiction Central Closed Stacks
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Summary

Summary

One of the most original psychoanalysts after Freud, Karen Horney pioneered such now-familiar concepts as alienation, self-realization, and the idealized image, and she brought to psychoanalysis a new understanding of the importance of culture and environment. In Newurosis and Human Growth, Dr. Horney discusses the neurotic process as a special form of human development, the antithesis of healthy growth. She unfolds the different stages of this situation, describing neurotic claims, the tyranny of inner dictates, and the neurotic's solutions for relieving the tensions of conflict in such emotional attitudes as domination, self-effacement, dependency, or resignation. Throughout, she outlines with penetrating insight the forces that work for and against the person's realization of his or her potentialities.


Author Notes

Karen Danielsen Horney was a German-born American psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. Educated at the universities of Freiburg, Gottingen, and Berlin, she practiced in Europe until 1932, when she moved to the United States. Initially, she taught at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute, but with others broke away in 1941 to found the American Institute for Psychoanalysis.

Horney took issue with several orthodox Freudian teachings, including the Oedipus complex, the death instinct, and the inferiority of women. She thought that classical psychoanalytic theory overemphasized the biological sources of neuroses. Her own theory of personality stressed the sociological determinants of behavior and viewed the individual as capable of fundamental growth and change.

(Bowker Author Biography)