Cover image for Like water for chocolate : a novel in monthly installments, with recipes, romances, and home remedies
Title:
Like water for chocolate : a novel in monthly installments, with recipes, romances, and home remedies
Author:
Esquivel, Laura, 1950-
Personal Author:
Uniform Title:
Como agua para chocolate. English
Edition:
First Anchor Books trade paperback edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Anchor Books, 1995.

©1992
Physical Description:
245 pages ; 21 cm
Language:
English
Reading Level:
1030 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR UG 7.2 9.0 55932.

Reading Counts RC High School 9.2 14 Quiz: 47221.
Geographic Term:
ISBN:
9780385420174
Format :
Book

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Status
East Delavan Branch Library X Adult Fiction Reading List
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Summary

Summary

The bestselling phenomenon and inspiration for the award-winning film.

Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in turn-of-the-century Mexico blends poignant romance and bittersweet wit.

This classic love story takes place on the De la Garza ranch, as the tyrannical owner, Mama Elena, chops onions at the kitchen table in her final days of pregnancy. While still in her mother's womb, her daughter to be weeps so violently she causes an early labor, and little Tita slips out amid the spices and fixings for noodle soup. This early encounter with food soon becomes a way of life, and Tita grows up to be a master chef, using cooking to express herself and sharing recipes with readers along the way.


Author Notes

She is the award-winning author of Like Water For Chocolate. She lives in Mexico City.

(Publisher Provided) Laura Esquivel was born in Mexico City, Mexico on September 30, 1950. Before becoming a full-time author, she worked as a kindergarten teacher and as a writer for children's television programs during the 1970s and 1980s. Her first novel, Como Agua para Chocolate (Like Water for Chocolate), was published in 1989 in Spanish and in 1992 in English. It was made into a movie, also written by Esquivel, in 1993. The movie won the Mexican Academy of Motion Pictures award. Her other novels include The Law of Love, Swift as Desire, Between the Fires, and Malinche. She has also published the children's story Estrellita Marinera, an essay entitled The Book of Emotions, and a philosophical treatise called Intimate Suculencias Kitchen.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Intoning the emotional highs and lows of Esquivel's earthy love story is the melodic voice of Yareli Arizmendi, the actress who played Rosaura in the film adaptation. The extensive film and stage backgrounds of the other readers of these audiobooks also contribute to their fine performances. Blythe Danner compassionately reads Newbery winner MacLachlan's intergenerational novel for children. With dignified flair, Lynn Redgrave performs Pilcher's collection of stories of traditional British family life. Playwright Smith brings a personal intensity to the rage and sorrow of the people she interviewed after the Crown Heights racial conflict in 1991. In a change of pace, the last title presents a vivid, full-cast dramatization of L'Amour's intriging short story of mistaken identity. These technically impressive releases will keep listeners riveted. ~--Nancy McCray


Publisher's Weekly Review

Each chapter of screenwriter Esquivel's utterly charming interpretation of life in turn-of-the-century Mexico begins with a recipe--not surprisingly, since so much of the action of this exquisite first novel (a bestseller in Mexico) centers around the kitchen, the heart and soul of a traditional Mexican family. The youngest daughter of a well-born rancher, Tita has always known her destiny: to remain single and care for her aging mother. When she falls in love, her mother quickly scotches the liaison and tyrannically dictates that Tita's sister Rosaura must marry the luckless suitor, Pedro, in her place. But Tita has one weapon left--her cooking. Esquivel mischievously appropriates the techniques of magical realism to make Tita's contact with food sensual, instinctual and often explosive. Forced to make the cake for her sister's wedding, Tita pours her emotions into the task; each guest who samples a piece bursts into tears. Esquivel does a splendid job of describing the frustration, love and hope expressed through the most domestic and feminine of arts, family cooking, suggesting by implication the limited options available to Mexican women of this period. Tita's unrequited love for Pedro survives the Mexican Revolution the births of Rosaura and Pedro's children, even a proposal of marriage from an eligible doctor. In a poignant conclusion, Tita manages to break the bonds of tradition, if not for herself, then for future generations. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

Take one part Whitney Otto's How To Make an American Quilt (McKay, 1991), add a smidgen of magical realism a la Garcia Marquez, follow up with several quixotic characters, garnish with love, and you'll have Like Water for Chocolate , a thoroughly enjoyable and quirky first novel by Mexican screenwriter Esquivel. Main character Tita is the youngest of three daughters born to Mama Elena, virago extraordinaire and owner of the de la Garza ranch. Tita falls in love with Pedro, but Mama Elena will not allow them to marry, since family tradition dictates that the youngest daughter remain at home to care for her mother. Instead, Mama Elena orchestrates the marriage of Pedro and her eldest daughter Rosaura and forces Tita to prepare the wedding dinner. What ensues is a poignant, funny story of love, life, and food which proves that all three are entwined and interdependent. Recommended for most collections.-- Peggie Partello, Keene State Coll., N.H. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


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