Cover image for An officer and a lady, and other stories
Title:
An officer and a lady, and other stories
Author:
Stout, Rex, 1886-1975.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First Carroll and Graff edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2000.
Physical Description:
184 pages ; 18 cm
Language:
English
ISBN:
9780786707645
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
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Material Type
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X Adult Mass Market Paperback Popular Materials-Mystery
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X Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
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X Adult Mass Market Paperback Central Closed Stacks
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X Adult Mass Market Paperback Mystery/Suspense
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Summary

Summary

The sexes battle, the head feuds with emotions it cannot control, and crime extorts and strikes and kills but does not pay in this collection of stories by Rex Stout at the outset of his celebrated career in mystery and suspense. Again and again in these tales taken from the pages of the pulps that first published him, Stout proves himself a master of the sudden reversal and unexpected revelation as he probes the thwarted heart and criminal mind.


Author Notes

Author Rex Stout was born on December 1, 1886. A child prodigy with a gift for mathematics, Stout drifted as he became an adult, holding odd jobs in many places---cook, cabinetmaker, bellhop, hotel manager, salesman, bookkeeper, and even a guide in a pueblo. But his true talent lay in storytelling; he sold his first story, about William Howard Taft, in 1912. His most famous creation is Nero Wolfe, a 286-pound detective genius who, with sidekick Archie Goodwin, can often solve a case without leaving his room. It is the way in which the puzzle is solved that intrigues Nero Wolfe, who is much like Sherlock Holmes in his ability to use deductive reasoning. More than 60 million copies (in 24 languages) of Stout's books have been sold. Stout writes quickly, drawing upon a lifetime of impressions. He neither uses an outline nor revises; he lets his characters take over as the story develops. The classy, erudite Nero Wolfe presents for readers an alternative to the hard-boiled branch of the genre. He died on October 27, 1975

(Bowker Author Biography)