Cover image for The honest-to-goodness truth
Title:
The honest-to-goodness truth
Author:
McKissack, Pat, 1944-2017.
Personal Author:
Edition:
First edition.
Publication Information:
New York : Atheneum Books, 2000.
Physical Description:
1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Summary:
After promising never to lie, Libby learns that it's not always necessary to blurt out the whole truth either.
General Note:
"An Anne Schwartz book."
Language:
English
Reading Level:
450 Lexile.
Program Information:
Accelerated Reader AR LG 3.8 0.5 35034.

Reading Counts RC K-2 3.3 2 Quiz: 20371 Guided reading level: O.
Added Author:
ISBN:
9780689826689
Format :
Book

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Summary

Summary

"Tell the truth and shame the devil," Libby's mama has told her. So what ever is Libby doing wrong? Ever since she started telling only the truth, the whole world seems to be mad at her. First it's her best friend, Ruthie Mae, who gets upset when Libby tells all their friends that Ruthie Mae has a hole in her sock. Then Willie gives her an ugly look when she tells the teacher he hasn't done his homework. It seems that telling the truth isn't always so simple.
Children will sympathize with Libby as she struggles to figure out that even though it's always wrong to tell a lie, there's a right and a wrong way to tell the truth. Giselle Potter's naively stubborn illustrations perfectly capture this humorous and poignant story by award-winning author Patricia C. McKissack.


Author Notes

Patricia C. McKissack was born in Smyrna, Tennessee on August 9, 1944. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Tennessee State University in 1964 and a master's degree in early childhood literature and media programming from Webster University in 1975. After college, she worked as a junior high school English teacher and a children's book editor at Concordia Publishing.

Since the 1980's, she and her husband Frederick L. McKissack have written over 100 books together. Most of their titles are biographies with a strong focus on African-American themes for young readers. Their early 1990s biography series, Great African Americans included volumes on Frederick Douglass, Marian Anderson, and Paul Robeson. Their other works included Black Hands, White Sails: The Story of African-American Whalers and Days of Jubilee: The End of Slavery in the United States. Over their 30 years of writing together, the couple won many awards including the C.S. Lewis Silver Medal, a Newbery Honor, nine Coretta Scott King Author and Honor awards, the Jane Addams Peace Award, and the NAACP Image Award for Sojourner Truth: Ain't I a Woman?. In 1998, they received the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement.

She also writes fiction on her own. Her book included Flossie and the Fox, Stitchin' and Pullin': A Gee's Bend Quilt, A Friendship for Today, and Let's Clap, Jump, Sing and Shout; Dance, Spin and Turn It Out! She won the Newberry Honor Book Award and the King Author Award for The Dark Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural in 1993 and the Caldecott Medal for Mirandy and Brother Wind. She dead of cardio-respiratory arrest on April 7, 2017 at the age of 72.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

Ages 4^-8. Libby learns that telling the truth is not always as simple as it seems, especially when it hurts. After she's punished for lying to her mother, Libby wounds her friends, classmates, and neighbors by pointing out their weaknesses, mistakes, and embarrassments to everyone, until she realizes that there are times to keep quiet. The story is very much a lesson, but it's a subtle one, and Potter's colorful, naive-style illustrations capture the innocence and eagerness of the "good girl" who learns that telling tales is not the way to be nice, that some things are private. Empathy is the message here, and Libby's scenarios are good starting points for discussion. --Hazel Rochman


Publisher's Weekly Review

"McKissack thoroughly examines a common childhood problem-discerning when the truth helps and when it hurts-with homespun language and accessible situations," wrote PW. "The intimate settings so integral to Potter's folk-art style provide a fitting complement to the author's cozy community." Ages 4-8. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-After being caught in a lie, Libby decides to always tell the truth no matter how much, or whom, it hurts. Her truth-telling, however, soon alienates friends and acquaintances. Libby's mother points out that there is such a thing as a hurtful truth, and Libby learns a lesson about empathy and tact. This charming story (Atheneum, 2000) is another wonderful example of Patricia McKissack's masterful wordsmithing. There's a delightful touch of vernacular here, home-spun similes, and a gentle humor. The author narrates her own story with an audible smile as Giselle Potter's folk-art illustrations are scanned iconographically. Original background music, as well as some sound effects, add to the fun. This title would lead naturally into discussions about honesty and consideration.-Teresa Bateman, Brigadoon Elementary School, Federal Way, WA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.