Cover image for The spirit of St. Louis : a history of the St. Louis Cardinals and Browns
Title:
The spirit of St. Louis : a history of the St. Louis Cardinals and Browns
Author:
Golenbock, Peter, 1946-
Personal Author:
Publication Information:
New York : Spike, [2000]

©2000
Physical Description:
xvii, 651 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Summary:
This is a glorious celebration of the Great American Game, and of the city that loves it so.
General Note:
"An Avon book."
Language:
English
Electronic Access:
Publisher description http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/description/hc042/99050025.html
ISBN:
9780380976607
Format :
Book

Available:*

Library
Call Number
Material Type
Home Location
Status
Central Library GV875.S3 G63 2000 Adult Non-Fiction Non-Fiction Area
Searching...

On Order

Summary

Summary

The Spirit of St. Louis is a glorious celebration of the Great American me, and of the city that loves it so. It is a love air that began in 1874, when a band of local boosters raised $20,000 to start a professional ballclub, and it has never waned--from the glory days of Rogers Hornsby and Grover Cleveland Alexander through the magnificent eve of Musial to Mark McGwire''s record-smashing fin de millennium. But a chronicle of the accomplished National League Cardinals, who trail only the Yankees in World Series titles, wouldn''t give the complete St. Louis baseball picture. For that, you need the Browns--once dubbed "First in shoes, first in booze, last in the American League"--whose own colorful exploits and personnel are stuff of sports legend. Peter Golenbock, the bestselling author and master of the baseball oral history, has written another remarkable saga enriched by extensive and incomparable remembrances from the scores of layers, managers and executives who lived it. You''ll hear Branch Rickey on George Sisler, Rogers Hornsby and his creation of the farm system. Hornsby on Grover Cleveland Alexander--and Alexander on Hornsby. Dizzy Dean on--who else?--Dizzy Dean. Frankie Frisch, Marty Marion, Enos Slaughter: so many other voices, including The Man" himself, Stan Musial. Bing Devine. Max Lanier and Johnny Mize. Eldon Auker, Ellis Clary, Denny Galehouse and Don Gutteridge on the 1940s Browns, who finally saw some success. Bill Veeck, Jr., whose greatest promotion of all was sending 3''7" Eddie Gaedel to the plate. Brooks Lawrence, the second man across the Cardinals'' color line. Jim Brosnan, the first man to break the players'' "code of silence." Bill White. Nelson Briles and Tim McCarver on Bob Gibson. Marvin Miller on Curt Flood. Tommy Herr, Darrell Porter and Joe McGrane on Whitey Herzog''s Cardinals. Cardinal owner Bill DeWitt, Jr., on the team today. In the end, you''ll find reading SPIRIT is akin to sifting around with a group of ballplayers reminiscing about the game, its greats and, naturally, The Life in one of America''s most storied baseball towns. THE SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS is a glorious celebration of the Great American Game, and of the city that loves it so. It is a love affair that began in 1874, when a band of local boosters raised $20,000 to start a professional ballclub, and it has never waned--from the glory days of Rogers Hornsby and Grover Cleveland Alexander through the magnificent eve of Musial to Mark McGwire''s record-smashing fin de millennium. But a chronicle of the accomplished National League Cardinals, who trail only the Yankees in World Series titles, wouldn''t give the complete St. Louis baseball picture. For that, you need the Browns--once dubbed "First in shoes, first in booze, last in the American League,"--whose own colorful exploits and personnel are stuff of sports legend.Peter Golenbock, the best-selling author and master of the baseball oral history, has written another remarkable saga enriched by extensive and incomparable remembrances from the scores of players, managers and executives who lived it.You''ll hear Branch Rickey on George Sisler, Rogers Hornsby and his creation of the farm system. Hornsby on Grover Cleveland Alexander--and Alexander on Hornsby. Dizzy Dean on--who else?--Dizzy Dean. Frankie Frisch, Marty Marion, Enos Slaughter: so many other voices, including "The Man" himself, Stan Musial. Bing Devine. Max Lanier and Johnny Mize. Eldon Auker, Ellis Clary, Denny Galehouse and Don Gutteridge on the 1940s Browns, who finally saw some success. Bill Veeck, Jr., whose greatest promotion of all was sending 3''7" Eddie Gaedel to the plate. Brooks Lawrence, the second man across the Cardinals'' color line. Jim Brosnan, the first man to break the players'' "code of silence." Bill White. Nelson Briles and Tim McCarver on Bob Gibson. Marvin Miller on Curt Flood. Tommy Herr, Darrell Porter and Joe McGrane on Whitey Herzog''s Cardinals. Cardinal owner Bill DeWitt, Jr., on the team today.


Author Notes

Peter Golenbock is a prolific sports journalist and author. He was born in New York City on July 19, 1946 and raised in Stamford, Connecticut.

He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1967 and the New York University School of Law in 1970.

While at Dartmouth, he began writing about sports for The Daily Dartmouth, which led to stints with the New York Times and the Boston Globe. It was also at Dartmouth where he became friends with Robert Ariel "Red" Rolfe, the former New York Yankees third baseman and the school's athletic director. Rolfe entertained him for hours with stories of the famous Yankees teams of the 1930's, which had a profound impact on Golenbock's unintended career path.

After graduating law school, he eventually landed a job in the legal department of Prentice-Hall Publishing. Surprisingly, he was able to convince the head of the trade book division to allow him to write about the Yankees. The resulting book, Dynasty: The New York Yankees 1949-64, became an instant bestseller, the first of many for Golenbock. Among his best-known works to follow include; The Bronx Zoo, Bums: An Oral History of the Brooklyn Dodgers, Balls, with Graig Nettles, Bats, with Davey Johnson, Personal Fouls, a look at corruption in college basketball, and Teammates, a children's book about the relationship between Jackie Robinson and Pee Wee Reese.

His latest work is entitled Rage: The Legend of "Baseball Bill" Denehy.

(Bowker Author Biography)


Reviews 3

Booklist Review

St. Louis has a rich baseball tradition, most recently embodied in the slugging exploits of Mark McGwire, but the tradition stretches back to the late 1800s and includes both the National League Cardinals and the American League Browns (who moved to Baltimore and became the Orioles in the 1950s). Along the way, St. Louis has produced its share of memorable players: Rogers Hornsby, Stan Musial, Bob Gibson, and Eddie Gaedel (the midget whom promoter extraordinaire Bill Veeck used as a pinch hitter in 1951). Golenbock, the author of such team histories as Wrigleyville (Chicago Cubs) and Dynasty (New York Yankees), makes good use of the traditional oral-history formula--letting the participants tell the story in their own words. Whenever possible, he interviews his subjects directly, but when necessary, he makes good use of print sources. The result is a vibrant, seamless account that lets readers glide through the decades listening to the men who made baseball history tell their tales. Wonderful reading for baseball fans in and out of St. Louis. --Wes Lukowsky


Publisher's Weekly Review

Having chronicled the Yankees (in Dynasty), Golenbock takes a look at another storied organization, the St. Louis Cardinals, and its near-forgotten crosstown rival, the St. Louis Browns. His understated narrative guides readers through an impressive collection of oral histories of past and living veterans of the game. Managers and owners play a significant role in the story as Golenbock does an excellent job of describing the impact of the two franchises on baseball history. The Cardinals' stalwart general manager, Branch Rickey, long before he signed Jackie Robinson to play for the Dodgers, revolutionized baseball by creating the farm system. He eventually built the Cards into a success (the team has won nine World Series, second only to the Yankees) though he paid players as little as possible. The Browns, however, struggled constantly, failing to garner new talent or retain rising stars, until owner and showman Bill Veeck (infamous for sending a midget to bat and for fielding a one-armed outfielder) was forced to sell the club. Significant baseball figures profiled include Rogers Hornsby, Dizzy Dean, Stan Musial, Curt Flood and Mark McGwire. Field-level anecdotes and insights from more than 150 baseball seasons abound. Both teams could boast great rosters at one time or another, but dynasties have eluded them. Their histories of struggle, with Golenbock's focus on the owner's hand, reveal how volatile the business of baseball has always been. (Jan.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Library Journal Review

St. Louis has had big league baseball since 1874 in the form of, first, the Browns and then (starting in 1892) the Cardinals. The Browns (who hung on until 1953) only won the American League pennant once, in 1944--although they did boast a few stars, like George Sisler and Ned Garver. The National League's Cardinals, on the other hand, had a series of sterling teams and won 14 flags and nine World Series in their time. Golenbock (Wrigleyville) spins a lively tale about these teams, filled with memories of Branch Rickey, Bell Veeck, Rogers Hornsby, Stan Musial, Mark McGwire, and others. This book is sure to be requested in libraries in and around St. Louis; other public libraries may want a copy as well.--Morey Berger, St. Joseph's Hosp. Medical Lib., Tucson, AZ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Table of Contents

Introductionp. xv
The Browns
Chapter 1 The Foundingp. 3
Chapter 2 Chris Von der Ahe: The Beer Baronp. 9
Chapter 3 Charlie Comiskey's Hoodlumsp. 19
Chapter 4 A Disputed Championshipp. 26
Chapter 5 Henry Lucas's Ill-Fated Maroonsp. 30
Chapter 6 The $15,000 Wagerp. 35
Chapter 7 Four-in-a-Row Championsp. 46
Chapter 8 The Demise of Von der Ahep. 51
Chapter 9 The Arrival of Mr. Rickeyp. 56
Chapter 10 Phil Ball's Fatal Mistakep. 69
The Cardinals
Chapter 11 Rickey Resurrects the Cardinalsp. 81
Chapter 12 Rajah Delivers a Pennantp. 95
Chapter 13 Alexander's Magic Momentp. 108
Chapter 14 The Rajah Is Sent Packingp. 118
Chapter 15 Casualtiesp. 122
Chapter 16 Rickey vs. Landisp. 129
Chapter 17 Early Deanp. 132
Chapter 18 Pepper's Yearp. 138
Chapter 19 Gabby Cuts His Own Throatp. 151
Chapter 20 Travels with Branchp. 165
Chapter 21 Dizzy Goes on Strikep. 167
Chapter 22 A Total Surprisep. 181
Chapter 23 The Tiger Fans Throw Garbagep. 188
Chapter 24 The Gashouse Gangp. 195
Chapter 25 The Gang Breaks Upp. 203
Chapter 26 Landis Gets His Revengep. 211
Chapter 27 Southworth Returnsp. 218
Chapter 28 Maxp. 229
Chapter 29 Number 6p. 233
Chapter 30 The Drought Endsp. 239
Chapter 31 Rickey Departsp. 247
Chapter 32 Three in a Rowp. 250
The Browns
Chapter 33 Ball's Playersp. 267
Chapter 34 Barnes Builds His Teamp. 274
Chapter 35 Lukep. 283
Chapter 36 1944p. 293
Chapter 37 In the Seriesp. 305
Chapter 38 The Pete Gray Erap. 309
Chapter 39 Down and Downp. 320
Chapter 40 Bill Veeck and the Midgetp. 326
Chapter 41 Grandstand Manager's Nightp. 333
Chapter 42 Rogers's Short Stayp. 339
Chapter 43 Charactersp. 343
Chapter 44 Memories of Satchp. 347
Chapter 45 Sayonara, Brownsp. 352
The Cardinals
Chapter 46 Escape to Mexicop. 361
Chapter 47 Slaughter's Mad Dashp. 372
Chapter 48 Fallout from the Firstp. 379
Chapter 49 The Saigh Erap. 388
Chapter 50 Gussiep. 398
Chapter 51 Early Integrationp. 407
Chapter 52 Der Binglep. 415
Chapter 53 The Professorp. 422
Chapter 54 Civil Unrestp. 431
Chapter 55 The Return of Mr. Rickeyp. 443
Chapter 56 1964p. 452
Chapter 57 Gashouse Gang Reduxp. 464
Chapter 58 The Passing of a Legendp. 470
Chapter 59 Roger and "Cha-Cha"p. 476
Chapter 60 World Championsp. 488
Chapter 61 The Intimidatorp. 493
Chapter 62 Gussie vs. the Playersp. 502
Chapter 63 Gussie's Piquep. 512
Chapter 64 Enter Whiteyp. 526
Chapter 65 Darrell's Redemptionp. 539
Chapter 66 A Pennant Surprisep. 550
Chapter 67 Magrane's Yearp. 564
Chapter 68 One Game Awayp. 572
Chapter 69 Whitey's Last Standp. 578
Chapter 70 A New Regimep. 582
Chapter 71 Godp. 591
Notesp. 601
Bibliographyp. 629
Indexp. 633

Google Preview